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Full text of "The Academy"

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Index Vol. XXVI- " 7 I ( t. 1902- 

[Note: This Ind< loes not list eve 
or reference 

_c-ne_,j;: " f " ; ' ' " ' T those tides 

of gene c : ■ \ t bou t t 

of -- - Sale • s r 



publication: 
cnange in for r n, vol.26. Sept. 1902, 
p. 2166' 

imnae Assocj : 

vo . - . e L9 " ■ , > : vol . 27, 
' y-June ! 904, p .4010 

Campus: 

enlarged, vol.26, Sept. 190*5, p. 2470 

historic trees on the campus, vol. 23, 
r. L90. , p, 2< 60 

Gen tenni al address: 

vo" 1 .26, e it 3 302, p. 2170 

Glass officers: 

vol .27, Oct. 3 903, p. 2489 

Glass rooms: 

en i in, vol.26, Sept. 1902, 

vol.26, Oct. 1903, p. 2468; vol.27. 
pril 1904, p. 3090 

Commencement: 

1903, vol. 26 ; y-June L90 , 

1904, vol.27, .' r-June 1904 - 16 



-too] t, vol ,27, Oct. L9( 



. ; :496 



ri c 

Pre ■ ratory dept added, vo ! ..^6, 
L902, p. 2229 

ir^ ■ living }u? rter : 
vo" 1 • ' ? ; Oct. L9Q/,, - 7 . 




( I n d ex vol . 26 - 2 7 ... con t . ; 

,] Ltory • Lv 3 1 uarters , con I 

L993, p. 2550; vol. 27, for. 1904. 3090 

a bo I i shed: 
' vol .26, Feb. 19 

Eu t er p e a n S o c j fe ty : 

met bers, vol.26 kpr. L9 »3, p. 24 
officers, vol.26, May- June 1903, p ^4^; 

vol. 26, Dec. 19( 1.2565 

see Euterpean section of each issue 

culty: 

1902, vol.26, p. 2240 j £441 

1903, vol.25, p. 2493 

Fountain : 

removed, vol.27, Oct. 1903, p. 2493 

Gifts: 

gift of £ . "• )0 for schoo 1 , vol .h6. 

903 , p 8295 
gift of c] -■ - of L901r !, Chrj 3t i: ' 
temple", vol.26, Jan. 1903, p. 

Hesperj ar Society : 

officers, vo n .26, May*- June 1.90= , p. 244 
see Hesperian section 3f each issue 

History : 

L884-1885-1886, vol.27-, Oct. 1903, :. 

2491 
eve 1 bs of interest at sehool--sti imary 
of every thi] t : 

7-] z 3- ; : J, vol.27, I ov. L9« 
p. 25* 
n - M E 32, vol. £7, Dec. 1903, 

p. ^555 
1892-1894, vo] .27 ran . I 904, p/ 

25* • 
'695; vol.27, Mar. ""904, p. 5049 

Infirmary: 

vol .26 , r^v , 3 903, p.fec69 



e 
2296 



(index Vo! . ' ■ t.) 

ockers provided day students: 
vol.26, Nov. L902, p 2238 

a in H a. 1 1 : 

new clock, vol.27, Sept. 1904, p. A 



tfemorj ! L Hall: 



•i; ■ Ha] L: 
vol. 26 > i\pr. L903, ri 2393; vol .. >3 . 

J 19 ; 4, 2433; vol.27, 
Apr. 1904, p. 3073; vol. 27, '- r -i me 
1904, p.4010,ff 

ic: 

see "Star course' 1 

:| '- y'i 2 • dates: 

vol.26, ■} L903 

-co ' ■ ies : 

vol. 26, ept. L902, p 2187; vol.26, 
Sept. L903, 3.2456; vol.26, Sept, 1903, 
5.2469; vol.27, Mar. 1904, p. 3049 

esqui-centenni< ] Celebration: 

vol.27, Nov. ! 903, 5 >; vo ' . j ec. 

- ^j --J ■'-' , p • 20 Oc 

Star course (music;: 

vol.27, Dec. 190... p. 2551 

Students: 

List of 1902, vol.26, Nov. 1902, p. 2\ 

List of 130-:, vol.27, Oct. 190o, p. 24 
senior class-1904, vol.27, 'It. 19 
P • I 

Vogler Hall: 

vol.26, Sept. 1900, p. 2453 > 2457 



c ho vi 3 , hi s t o ry o I ' : 

vol.27, Nov. 1903, p. 2520; 
■ ] 90 P. 2552 



; vol.27, Dec. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/academy19021904sale 



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THE ACADEMY. 



Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C, September, 1902. No. 222. 

Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



3Etittortal. 



The New Century. 



The present year is the beginning of the second century in the 
history of the school. This is a distinction which thus far has been 
enjoyed by only two "other institutions for the education of girls and 
young women. It is evident to even a casual observer that the 
close of the one period of time and the beginning of another period 
are characterized by plans which point to new and enlarged work. 
That the Academy has made an enviable record in the past is rec- 
ognized by every one. That it is preparing to adapt itself to the 
needs of the present day, and to enter new and enlarged fields of 
usefulness is also apparent. This is shown by the work of securing 
needed endowment ; by the increasingly active interest of the 
Alumnae, at home and in distant States ; by the erection of ancij 
preparation for new buildings, three having been added in recej 
years, and the large Centennial Memorial Hall, and a pof-^ 
dormitory, being near at hand ; by the spirit of patriotj 
within the school, which has united with the friendly ii 
centennial celebration and has filled the school with 
full capacity ; and in a special manner by the plai 
and broadening the curriculum, with a view to 

30*09 



2166 The Academy. 

in the very front rank of educational institutions. At the same 
time there is a careful and conservative effort to graft all these new 
and useful things on the parent stem of all that is good and endur- 
ing in the plans and work of the past, and with a full sense of the 
obligations which will meet the school in the new period of time, 
Salem Academy and College enters upon the second century 
of its existence. 

Among the many signs of the times is the changed position of 
our publication, The Academy. It is now nearly twenty-five 
years since the first number was printed. It was then a four page 
paper ; as time passed it was enlarged to eight pages, and on spe- 
cial occasions to twelve and even sixteen pages. 

A number of years ago the Hesperian Literary Society began 
the publication of the organ of their society called The Hesperian. 
At the same time the Euterpean Society arranged for a special 
column in The Academy to contain the news of the Society. 
These various efforts grew in strength, until in the natural order of 
things the time came to unite them. 

Soon after the beginning of the present term a meeting of the 
officers of the two societies was held in Dr. CleweH's study, in 
Main Hall, with the following result. It was resolved that The 
Hesperian be merged with The Academy, and that the Euterpean 
Society assume the same obligations as the Hesperian Society, 
which are as follows : 

The Academy will in future become the official publication of 
the Euterpean and Hesperian Literary Societies, as it is at present 
the official organ of the Alumnae Society. As the Constitution o* 
the Alumnae Society requires each member to be a subscriber, so 
in future each member of both the Hesperian and^, Euterpean So- 
cieties must be a subscriber to this, their official journal. 

The form of the paper is to be a thirty-two page magazine, 
and of this number of pages each of the two Societies will be res- 
)onsible for a department, filling six pages of each issue. 

The cover will for the present be white and yellow, the school 
^rs, and each of these being also one of the colors of the two 
The cover will be deckel edge. 

?maining portion of the publication will be devoted, as 
[p the interests of the school, as now[constituted, and 
lotion of the plans of the Alumnae Association, 
tinue to be The Academy. 



The Academy. 2167 

The Literary Societies have appointed the following young 
ladies to represent their interests in the departments which will be 
in their charge. For the Euterpean Society — Miss Bess B. Sloan, 
Editor in chief ; Miss Pauline Sessoms, Assistant Editor; Miss 
Agnes Belle Goldsby, Literary Elitor; Miss Mary Gudger, Ex- 
change Editor ; Miss Corinne Baskin, Business Manager. 

From the Hesperian Society — Miss Amy R. Sloan, Editor-in- 
chief; Miss Kate M. Kilbuck, Assistant Editor; Miss Adah A. 
Petway, Literary Editor ; Miss Florence Moorman, Exchange Edi- 
tor ; Miss Sadie M. Rollins, Business Manager. 

We believe the form of the paper will commend itself to the 
readers. It will be more convenient in size and shape, and can be 
easily bound or filed away ; it will be more varied in the nature of 
its contents than in the past, because the material will be in part 
by the pupils, and in part by the faculty. As the years develop 
the increase of pages and the addition of new departments can 
place it in the ranks of the literary magazines, tho' at the present 
time our ideal is to make it " newsy'' in nature, rather than a liter- 
ary publication. Still, as there is a positive advance in the 32-page 
publication of this year, as compared with the 4-page paper of 
twenty- five >ears ago, so we hope that 25 years hence (or shall we 
say one hundred years hence) The Academy will attain to a size 
and importance which will be worthy of the growth expected dur- 
ing another hundred years in the history of the school. 

The Academy, in its new form, greets its many readers and 
old friends and hopes to add many new friends to its list during 
this and during succeeding years. 



— We print in full in this number the address of Governor Ay- 
cock, delivered in the Salem Square on Commencement morning. 
One portion of the address, that relating to the Endowment, was 
not included in the manuscript handed to us, but we hope to receive^ 
it so as to print it in the October number. 



— The Academy will, this month be sent to a largf 
of new patrons, and we thus bring our formal gre 
paper will go far towards keeping our friends at a di, 
with the school, and we trust that it will be a wek 



2 1 68 The Academy. 

— One of the great pleasures of the patrons is to feel well ac- 
quainted with the school where their daughters study. This can 
be the case after a persoual visit to Salem, but not nearly all the 
patrons can make a personal visit. Some acquaintance can be 
made by the letters of the pupils written to the home friends, and 
The Academy will add other details regarding the school-life and 
home. But to those who desire a full account of the section, the 
town and the school, we recommend the " History of Wachovia," 
which is advertised elsewhere in this paper. The book contains 
nearly 400 pages, has 30 or more illustrations, and will bring the 
patrons into close sympathy with the school home of their absent 
daughters. 



— The weather was not propitious on opening day, but this did 
not in any way deter the school from thoroughly enjoying the occa- 
sion. It was indeed a bright and happy time, a worthy beginning 
of what we hope will be a most successful year. 



— With the enlarged Academy comes the natural desire to 
enter new fields and homes. Will not our readers unite with us 
in securing new subscribers ? That means not only the permanent 
prosperity of the paper, but also the increased attendance of pupils 
in the school, for The Academy can be made a power for good in 
the general work of the institution. 



— The summer was characterized by more visits than any pre- 
vious year. Dr. and Mrs. Clewell met with and organized branch 
Alumnae Associations, and enjoyed a pleasant stay in the homes of 
the pupils all the way from Norfolk, Va., to St. Augustine, Fla., 
and also went westward as far as Asheville. Mr. Pfohl journeyed 
k from Charlotte eastward to Bennettsville. All of these visits found 
lost cordial welcome awaiting the travellers. 



-The good work of endowment is being considered during 
lys. The sum of thirty thousand dollars has been secured 
good pledges, and even this will make its influence 
history of the school. Still more so will be the 



The Academy. 2169 

case when the lull one hundred thousand dollar endowment has 
been gathered. 



— The good wishes of The Academy go with our friends who 
severed their connection with the school in June last, and our 
hearty welcome is extended to those who begin their work with us 
at this time. 



— The cool weather at the beginning greatly aided in the or- 
ganization of the school. There was little homesickness, and the 
energy with which the work was begun is very gratifying. 



— The increase in boarding pupils as compared with last year 
is very gratifying to all who have shown an active interest in the 
work. 

— We will publish the list of our pupils in our next issue. 



— Bishop Rondthaler's visit to Europe this summer has been 
a most enjoyable one. He has had good weather, has enjoyed 
good health, and hopes to be at home again about the middle of 
October. On Monday morning. Sept. 29, the following letter from 
the Bishop was read to the pupils in the morning chapel service : 
" I have asked Dr. CleweH to read you this little note of greeting 
so that you may be sure that I have not forgotten you. I am now 
in the city of Berlin, which has during the past few years become 
one of the greatest cities in the world. It is filled, too, with mu- 
seums, galleries of paintings, memorials of victory, and new build- 
ings of the most beautiful character. But the weather has been 
very cold and two days in succession I fled to my comfortable hotel 
from the winter-like storm. Tomorrow I start on my journey 
westward and homeward, and I can't tell how glad I will be to see 
you all, — the old scholars whom I know and the new scholars whom 
I want to know. God has given me a very beautiful journey, and 
there will be much to tell when, with his blessing, I get home 
again. How is the Latin getting along? Have the Seniors got to 
Brundisium yet? Are the Juniors ready for Biblical Literature? 
When will you all recite the first hymn for me ? With much love 
I am, very truly, your friend, Edward Rondthaler " 



2170 The Academy. 

Centennial Address. 



DELIVERED BY HIS EXCELLENCY, GOVERNOR CHARLES B 
AYCOCK, IN THE SALEM SQUARE, COMMENCEMENT MORN- 
ING, MAY 29, 1902. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — It is a great privilege to be per- 
mitted to participate in the exercises of this interesting occasion. 
A century has passed since the establishment of this Academy for 
the education of young women, and we have met to celebrate that 
event. We feel that the time has been long, and yet there is pos- 
sibly some living person who has heard the story of the foundation 
of this institution from lips that were speaking when the work was 
begun. We feel, therefore, a nearness to the event. 

This was a great day for the people of the Moravian faith and 
a great day for the State when the Moravians in Wachovia recog- 
nized the necessity and duty of providing for the education of their 
women. I find no record that these people found it necessary to 
establish an institution of their own for the education of their sons 
and yet it is a matter of observation that their sons are among the 
best educated in the State. It was their fortunate recognition of a 
great truth that has made them a wonderful people, and that truth 
is aptly expressed by my friend, Dr. Charles D. Mclver, of the 
State Normal and Industrial College, when he says that to educate 
a man is to educate a single citizen, but to educate a woman is to 
educate a whole household. 

In 1753 the founders of Wachovia came here. They found a 
wilderness. They were six weeks in coming from Bethlehem. 
They suffered much on that journey, and one can never know what 
their sacrifices were until he has the excellent book of Dr. Clewell, 
"The History of Wachovia in North Carolina." The original 
settlers lived far apart. The Indians were frequent visitors and life 
was a constant danger, but the people who settled here were imbued 
with the spirit of love. They came to establish a community where 
they could worship God without restraint, and where they would 
be able to use their lives and means to promote His glory. With 
this spirit they were enabled to endure any number of hardships, 
looking always to Him who promised in the long ago to b-,' ever 
present with those who believed in Him. It was this spirit of con- 
secration to God that enabled them to endure hardships which have 



The Academy. 2171 

made other people despair, but which only served to stimulate their 
industry and their careful oversight to provide against the evils 
arising from the machinations of the enemy. So they went about 
their works in calmness and in peace ; ihey built houses and cleared 
the lands and dammed the waters asd built mills and opened shops 
for work. They maintained peace with those who came among 
them and established a relation of friendliness with the Indians. 
They attempted to carry out to the fullest the injunction to " love 
the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and 
with all thy mind," and in so doing they were able to love their 
neighbors as themselves. For it is a truth that we can only love 
our neighbors as we love ourselves for any length of time and with 
any certainty when we have obeyed the first injunction. The real 
Abou Ben Ahdem can only exist in him who has first set his heart 
upon God, for no one truly loves his fellow man who does not first 
love Him who made his fellow man. And so with trust in God and 
faith in their fellow men these original settlers in this community 
went about their daily work, fearing God and naught else. In this 
strength they were enabled to do great work and when the evil 
times came and the Indians arose and put to death the settlers 
hereabouts the Moravian communities were free from .danger. 
They not only preserved themselves but were helpful to others and 
saved many of their neighbors from torture and the tomahawk. 

Pursuing the even tenor of their way, in peace among them- 
splves, in charity towards all others, they continued to grow, to 
develop, to enrich themselves, storing their granaries with much 
food until the troublous days of the Revolution. They were men 
and women of peace. They believed that war was unnecessary and 
they refused to take part either on the side of Great Britain or the 
colony of North Carolina. This was with them a religious duty 
and they held to it under persecution from both sides and won the 
confidence of their neighbors by their fidelity to their religious 
convictions and their uprightness of conduct. They were at all times 
willing to render unto Caesar the things that were Caesar's and 
they paid to the Colony of North Carolina a triple tax but refused 
to fight for her, not because they were cowards, but because they 
were too brave to violate what they believed to be the law of God, 
and in obedience to their simple faith they so won the confidence 
of the State that their lands were by legislative enactment saved 
from confiscation, and the State recognized by special statute their 



2172 The Academy. 

right to be freed from the ordinary oath and the duty to bear arms. 
This was a great victory and proves to us that in a day ol great 
passion, in the hour even of patriotic feeling, a people may live 
secure in peace and quiet if they but adhere with firmness and sin- 
cerity to an unpopular doctrine. When the war of the Revolution 
was over and our independence had been gained these good people 
went about their affairs with earnestness doing their daily duty and 
putting away for tomorrow the savings of to-day. Gradually their 
contact with the outside world modified their views and at a later 
time they became willing to bear arms in defence of their State and 
proved on many a battlefield their fidelity to the Southern Con- 
federacy. 

In the meantime, however, they had taken up in accordance 
with their views, the education of their children and as the shortest 
way to this end r they established this Academy. At that time 
Thomas Jefferson was President of the United States. The Louis- 
iana Purchase had not been added to the United States. Our Re- 
public was an experiment. Napoleon was conquering the world, 
and Wellington had not become the most famous general of mod- 
ern times. Democracy was just beginning to assert itself, and the 
divine right of kings had not been completely overthrown. No 
steam boat had ever plowed the waters of river, lake or ocean, and 
no railroad train had ever roared through the land. The electric 
telegraph was unknown and the telephone was undreamed of. But 
these people believed that there were greater things ahead of them 
and in order that they might be achieved they taught their children 
all that they knew and sought to inspire them with the spirit of in- 
vestigation. The result of their work can be seen today. The 
teaching of frugality, economy and industry can be shown in 
the wealth of this community to-day. The manufacturing which 
now makes your prosperity can be traced to the mill which was 
established in 1753, for those old men in that day made provision 
or the future by studying nature and working out of the raw mate- 
rial the useful necessities of life. The present generation has filled 
your streets with the clangor of the electric car, and has harnessed 
the water power of the Yadkin, and filled your homes with light 
from the electricity produced by that power. But they would not 
have accomplished this if those who went before had not laid the 
foundations for their present successes. No one can adequately 
measure the importance of performing well and perfectly the duty 



The Academy. 2173 

of today to the end that those who follow us may do the largest 
work tomorrow, and it is a mark of real greatness that without 
knowing what the results of what we do shall be we perform each 
day the duty that lies immediately, before us and by this perform- 
ance make life easier and better for a future time. It is a great 
glory to his people that without foreseeing events they wrought as 
became men and women in the fear of God the deeds which the 
day required and left the future to care for itself. This power 
makes a strong people, and it is no small part of the heritage of 
this good State of ours to have had within her borders such a 
people. Trusting God to the utmost they have ever felt that it was 
their duty to develop themselves to the utmost in order that they 
might serve Him in the fullest way, and this institution is in itself 
the highest manifestation of their purpose to live for those who 
come after them. 

Who can calculate the influences which have gone out from 
these sacred walls. More than ten thousand women have gone 
into this State and other States and nations with the training re- 
ceived here, and have transmitted it to other generations to bioaden, 
to ennoble, to uplift mankind. A pebble dropped into the sea is 
said to send its circles out until they are broken by the lands sur- 
rounding. If this be true, who can estimate the widening waves of 
influence which have come from educated women who have had 
their lives shaped here. They have adorned many homes. They 
have taught a multitude of children ; they have illustrated learning 
in its highest and most beautiful forms ; they have sown the seeds 
that have developed into a harvest of prosperity ; they have awak- 
ened the strains which have lifted us to the highest planes. They 
have above all made a beautiful home life which comes nearest to 
that life peace which is promised to all those who walk in His 
steps: For one hundred years one after another during the slow 
process of the days they have walked among us serene, self-pos- 
sessed, alert, trained, capable, commanding, because of their force 
and culture. They have made life easier, they have made it better, 
they have ma H e it nobler, and no possession of our State is greater 
than the memory of their work. If we love the things which are 
true, which are of good report, we love them because we have 
been taught, and these women who have gone out hence have ever 
been teachers of those things which are best and most uplifting. I 
have come today, therefore, in the name of the State, to share with 



2174 The Academy. 

you in the joy of this occasion and to acknowledge the debt which 
we all owe to those brave men and women who in 1802 decided 
that the iuture demanded an educated womanhood. At that time 
it was thought by most people that men only should be educated, 
but the Moravians were of different opinion. They established a 
school at Bethlehem, at Lititz and here, and these are the most 
ancient institutions for the higher education of women to be found 
anywhere in the land among Protestants. The Moravians are not 
to be measured by their numbers but by their influence, and the 
women of the world owe them a debt of gratitude which can never 
be adequately repaid. The school established here in 1802 has 
never been closed. 

I may be permitted to quote here from the excellent work of 
Dr. Clewell : 

"It is the third school in the United States, in point of age, 
for the higher education of young women. Its patronage is daawn 
from every portion of the land, and the register shows an attend- 
ance of ten thousand pupils, or an average of one hundred new 
names each year all through the century. It is non-sectarian in its 
principles, but deeply religious in its methods of work. State uni- 
versities are identified with their particular States Denominational 
schools are associated especially with the Churches to which they 
belong. Salem Female Academy is looked upon as the school of 
the South which has done a work of great usefulness for the pro- 
motion of true womanoood. It stood alone for half a century, 
and now, at the end of a hundred years, in the period of general 
educational interest, it continues to do its work with zeal and 
energy." 

It not only continues to do its work with zeal and energy, but 
with increasing efficiency as the years roll b,y, and I may add that 
not only the State of North Carolina is benefitted but many other 
States have felt its great influence. It is not at all improbable that 
we owe to this institution the other colleges for the education of 
women in the State, and the recognition by the State herself in the 
establishment of the Normal and Industrial College of her duty 10 
educate her women. This is an honorable heritage and one which 
ought to thrill your hearts with a sense of responsibility for still 
further and higher work, for we must all recognize the truth that 
the history of achievements done is valuable only to us in so far as 
it encourages us to do better still. We have entered into a new 



The Academy. 2175 

century. We have crossed that invisible line which separates the 
old from the new, and while we hold on with tenacity to the old 
we do so wisely only when we hold to it for better service in 
the new. 

We are in a period when the demand is for universal educa- 
tion and that demand can only be adequately made and can only 
be sustained by the right sort of education. We must not only 
teach, but we must teach aright. We must teach all the people to 
know something, to do something, to be something. Knowledge 
is power, but it is power merely because it enables us to be some- 
thing and to be something is what constitutes character, and this 
last is the only thing which we can take into the world to come. 
Edu cation is not reading and writing alone — it is reading and writ- 
ing, but it is something more, something better, something higher, 
for we read and write not as an end, but as a means, and if we take 
what we know to be the end we shall neither do any thing or be 
anything. All that there is in the books, calculus, poetry, astron- 
omy, science, whatsoever things may be taught to us, are valuable 
only because they enable us to do something worth being done, 
and to become something worth being. There is significance in 
the motto of our State, "To be, rather than to seem," and educa- 
tion is being, not seeming ; for what we are is truth ; what we seem 
to be is falsehood. It is not needful for me to have said these 
things here, because what I have said is in the line of the teachings 
of this institution, for in the very foundation of this school there 
was deposited in the cornerstone this inscription : "In the name of 
God, the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Ghost, in the year 
after the birth of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, one thousand 
eight hundred and three, on the sixth day of October, in the twen- 
ty-seventh year of the Independence of the United States of Amer- 
ica, when Thomas Jefferson was president of them, in the fiftieth 
year after the settling of the first members of the Church of the 
United Brethren in North Carolina, and the beginning of Bethabara, 
in the thirty-eighth year since the beginning of building Salem, 
the foundation of this house for a boarding school of girls was laid 
in a solemn manner, in the presence of the whole congregation, 
with fervent prayer to our Lord, that by this school, to be estab- 
lished in this house, His name may be glorified, his kingdom of 
grace be enlarged in this country, and the salvation of souls of 
those who shall be educated therein be promoted." 



2176 The Academy. 

A school established in this spirit and conducted in this fashion 
could not fail of accomplishing great good and of realizing the 
principle need of education. Our forefathers in framing our earliest 
Constitution recognized the fact that the proper result from educa- 
tion is a higher life. They declared that "religion, mortality and 
knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness 
of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be 
encouraged." The citizens of Wachovia were but putting into 
practice this declaration of our Constitution when they established 
Salem Female Academy and the work which this Academy has 
done justifies the faith in which it was founded. " By their fruits 
shall ye know them" is a test by which this Academy can well 
afford to be tried and in the trial its perpetuity and continued effi- 
ciency will be assured. 

But this is not the time or. place for this sort of speech. This is 
an occasion of congratulation ; this is an hour of happiness ; this is 
a day when thousands who love this institution have met to do 
honor to the memory of the founders, who looking into the future 
saw the work which ought to be done and prepared the means for 
doing it. Their names should live forever. The good deeds 
which they did have not been interred with their bones ; their 
works live after them and their memory still remains green. They 
builded better than they knew because they built in faith, trusting 
to God to make the results commensurate with their hopes. We 
come today with the fruits of one hundred years to place upon 
their graves, and to take new inspiration from their devotion and 
self-sacrifice. 

We come again to proclaim the true doctrine that woman is the 
chief hope of the State, and in her culture we shall find the safety 
and prosperity of society and the State. 



— A number of new text books have been introduced into the 
classes this year, with the hope that they will aid the special inter- 
est which is abroad among the workers. Standards are being 
rapidly raised, and as the work of the graded schools are improved 
Salem will be able to advance the entrance requirements. 



— Monthly scholastic reports will be sent out this year, the 
first one about October 20th. 



The Academy. 2177 

The Opening Day. 



The opening day carries with it a certain influence all through 
the year. This year the programme was arranged on an entirely 
new plan. The exercises were held in the large Moravian Home 
Church, since the number of pupils and the visitors are too great 
to find room in the Academy Chapel. At 11 o'clock, Sept. 9th, 
the Academy pupils entered the church by the east door, while 
Prof. Shirley rendered a voluntary on the organ which has done 
its good service for now more than a hundred years. The pupils 
filled the entire middle row of pews. On the north side of the 
auditorium were seated the members of the Salem Boys' School, 
while all the remaining portion of the ground floor was filled with 
patrons and visitors. 

Prof. A. H. Patterson and Rev. H. E. Rondthaler occupied 
the upper platform, while Dr. Clewell conducted the opening exer- 
cises from the lower platform. In his opening remarks he stated 
that this was a remarkable occasion. It is the beginning of a new 
century, and it is interesting to compare the present school with 
that of a hundred years ago. Then the school consisted of four 
boarding pupils, a score of day pupils, with a few teachers ; now 
the number of teachers employed to care for the school of nearly 
four hundred is as large as the number of pupils and teachers one 
hundred years ago. Then they had perhaps two rooms in a two 
story building ; now eight or nine buildings are needed for the 
work of the school. The growth has been marked and steady, and 
the history shows the success of the century's work. The speaker 
further stated that the effort had always been to do all work to the 
glory of God, and that if the new century is to be a success it will 
be necessary to take Jesus Christ as the supreme head of the school 
and make him the guide and director. If this is done tnere is no 
reason why the numbers and influence should not increase in the 
new century in the same proportion that it did in the past century. 
He further expressed the hope that when another century has 
elapsed our children may look back to this day and say that by 
the grace of God the foundations of the new school century were 
well laid even upon the rock Christ Jesus. 

Rev. Howard Rondthaler then introduced the speaker of the 
day, Prof. A. H. Patterson, of the University of Georgia. The in- 
troduction was gracefully made, with an allusion to the fact that 



2178 The Academy. 

the speaker was a former member of the Salem Boys' School, and 
that Salem was his native town. Prof. Patterson is a member of 
the faculty of the University of Georgia, and is making a name and 
fame for himself in his chosen profession. His subject was : "Is 
Mars Inhabited?" The lecture was a scientific effort, with depth 
of thought, and yet so carefully prepared that all could understand 
and enjoy. After a description of the relative place of the planet 
Mars in the Solar System, he proceeded to compare its conditions 
with that of the Earth. The speaker advanced in his subject to 
the time when the first maps of Mars were made, and placed before 
his hearers the views of the advocates of one and another theory, 
and the views of their opponents. The theory of the "canals" 
was discussed, and the lecturer advanced the thought that the 
" canals " were not canals for water, but that they were really large 
stretches of fertile land, made fertile by irrigation, water being 
carried from the center of the water supply by means of artificial 
irrigating waterways. He discussed the question of life upon the 
planet Mars in a most interesting manner, and finally treated of the 
age of Mars, taking up the general subject of young and old worlds, 
living and dead stars. The entire scientific lecture was interesting 
and instructive, and at the conclusion Dr. Clewell stated that a 
copy of the lecture would be filed in the school archives, with the 
note attached that in 2002, when a full hundred years have elapsed, 
the views of Professor Patterson be discussed and compared with 
the discoveries which will have been made between the present 
time and that date. 

The exercises were closed with a hymn and the benediction, 
and the pupils dispersed to their class rooms, and work was at 
once begun. 

Though the rain was falling the enthusiasm and interest in the 
occasion was not abated, and if the opening day can be taken as an 
index to the year, all will be well in this opening session of the 
new century. 



— The rigid system of marking will aid the teachers to accom- 
plish the special tasks assigned them. It is very desirable that 
parents residing in town should co-operate with us in preventing 
absences during the year, as the attendance as well as the recita- 
tions will be more carefully considered this year than ever before. 



The Academy. 2179 

Dr. and Mrs. Clewell's Summer Visit. 



In response to numerous and cordial invitations Dr. and Mrs. 
Clewell arranged to make an extended visit to the homes of the 
Alumnae and ot the present pupils. The start was made Friday, 
June 20th, and the first objective point was- Atlanta, Ga. Judge 
Lumpkin was at the station and drove them to his residence on 
Piedmont Avenue, where Mrs. Lumpkin awaited them. At this 
hospitable home they were entertained during the stay in Atlanta, 
and this visit, as well as those which followed, was made most en- 
joyable by the cordiality of the entertainers. 

While in Atlanta a reception was given to the Alumnae by 
Mrs. Lumpkin, at her residence, and the following friends were 
present : Miss Hallie Palmer, Mrs. Frank G. North, Misses Louise 
and Dorothy Breitenbucher, Misses Kate, Alice and Carrie Ollin- 
ger, Mrs. F. M. Coker, Miss Kate Richardson, Misses Grace and 
Lula Callaway, Miss Mary Ellen Yancey, Miss Katie Glenn John- 
ston, Miss Alice Cary, Miss May Bancker, Miss Edna Penic1c7 
Mrs. Sallie Hunnicutt Prescott, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McGee, Mrs. 
Joseph Ollinger, Mrs. W. W. Draper, Mrs. C. J. Daniel, Miss 
Cecil Daniels, Judge and Mrs Lumpkin. After a time -spent in 
social converse and in the enjoyment of the elegant refreshments 
provided by the hostess, the President of the Atlanta Branch Alum- 
nae Association, Mrs. Daniel, requested Dr. Clewell to address the 
company. This he did, describing the Centennial celebration in 
its preparation and in the development of the celebration itseif; 
he laid special stress on the money gift sent by the Atlanta Branch,, 
and thanked the members for this donation. The gratifying results 
of the work of the Endowment Committee were spoken of, andl 
throughout, his remarks received the interested attention of th| 
friends. 

During the stay in Atlanta visits were made to the homes 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McGee, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ollinger, 
and Mrs. John Sturgis Jones (Ida Rogers) and Mr. and Mr; 
M. Coker. One of the mornings was spent with Judge Ij 
in the Capitol building, and the Judge introduced Dr. 
Gov. Candler, who was very much interested in our Cel 
and also to Hon. J. M. Terrell, the present nominee for G< 
and to other prominent State officials. 

The travellers found it difficult to bid their kind friends ii 



am 
I cal 



2180 The Academy. 

lanta farewell, but a few hours journey brought them to Macon, 
where another warm welcome awaited them. Miss Geraldine Des- 
sau was at the station, and they were soon at home in the Vineville 
residence of Mr. and Mrs Washington Dessau. The same evening 
there was a meeting of a number of the Macon Alumnae, and at 
this meeting a formal organization was effected by the election of 
the following officers : President — Mrs. Daisy Clisby Ryals ; Vice 
President — Miss Geraldine Dessau ; Secretary and Treasurer — Miss 
Louise Campbell. The list of those present to greet the visitors 
were : Mrs. Ryals, Miss Dessau, Miss Campbell, Miss Louise Ha- 
zlehurst, Mrs. Annie Crutchfield Calloway, Miss Minnie Barnes 
and Mr. and Mrs Washington Dessau. The meeting was held on 
the lawn in front of Miss Geraldine' s home, where the Conference 
and election was held, refreshments served and the 'social part 
greatly enjoyed. 

During the brief stay in Macon the visitors had the pleasure of 
calling on Mrs. Clisby and Mrs. Ryals, and also Mr. and Mrs. 
Calder P. Willingham, where they met Miss Ruth, who later be- 
came a member of our school family. 

The journey southward brought the friends to Albany, where 

they spent two days as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Wes- 

losky, at the home of Misses Retta and Janette Weslosky. The 

stay in Albany was divided between the pleasures of the social 

greetings to friends and the study of the wonderful resources of 

what is sometimes called the garden spot of Georgia. There are a 

tumber of former pupils in Albany : Mrs. Rosalee Bell (Rosalee 

Lehman), Mrs. Sallie Jones (Sallie Davis), Miss Clara May Lewis, 

rs. Rebecca de Graffenreid, Mrs. Sam Tift (Allatia Westbrook), 

id Mrs. C. M. Clark. By an accident they failed to meet some of 

ese friends, several having called while the visitors were away 

were absent when Dr. and Mrs. Clewell called. The visits 

the immense melon fields and peach orchards were very interest- 

The melon and the peach have made Georgia famous in the 

'al markets of the land, and Mr. and Mrs. Weslosky gave 

e time to the pleasure of their guests. Even the great 

to detract from the enjoyment of this interesting visit to 

Georgia. 

travellers received a taste of the Sunny South in the ride 

lbany, Ga., to Jacksonville, Florida. The temperature was 

or near that mark ; the delays at stations increased the noon- 



The Academy. 2181 

day heat, but the travellers were conscious of the unusual courte- 
sies which were being accorded them, so that even these surround- 
ings elicited the remark : "Well, the afternoon's journey has not 
been so bad after all." "No," was the reply, "we might have 
had a railroad wreck." 

In the cool of the evening the train pulled into the Jackson- 
ville station, where the travellers found Mrs. Wilson, Mr. Reynolds 
and Mr. Aird awaiting their arrival. A pleasant drive of a mile 
along the well-lighted business street of the city brought them to 
the hospitable Reynolds home, where they were entertained while 
in Jacksonville. In this pleasant family circle they met Margery, 
Etta and Willie, with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, their 
grand parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. N. Reynolds- and the great grand- 
father, Mr. H. Reynolds. It is seldom that four generations, all 
well and hearty, are thus permitted to enjoy the pleasures of life 
together. 

Saturday morning Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, went to Atlantic 
Beach, which is an hour's ride from Jacksonville. Here they were 
the guests of Mrs. Bullard, at the great Continental Hotel. Miss 
Mattie Belle Bullard and Miss Pauline Sessoms had gone less than 
twenty-four hours before, so the pleasure of greeting them was 
missed. A pleasant drive up the beach to the mouth of the St. 
John's River, a chat on the pier, and a drive down to Pablo Beach 
were among the marked enjoyments of the day as Mrs. Bullard's 
guests. 

Sunday was spent at Pablo Beach as the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cooper, at Mary McMurray's home. Mr. Aird came down 
from the city, and the day was restful and enjoyable in the Florida 
home on the beach of the old Atlantic. 

Tuesday was spent with Mr. Robert Ranson in St. Augustine. 
Frances has grown to be quite a large girl, and her Salem friends 
hope to have her with them in the school at some time in the future. 
Mr Ranson devoted the day to the pleasure of the visitors. They 
were shown the mysteries of the fore, the interesting, narrow streets 
of old St. Augustine, the palatial hotels, the beautiful palms, the 
lighthouse and the grand old ocean. The day will always be a 
pleasant picture in the memory, and the influences which were 
conducive to this were the kindness and generous attention of Mr. 
Ranson, the host of the day. 

Returning to Jacksonville, Mrs. Reynolds and Mrs. Wilson 



2i82 The Academy. 

drove them about .the city, showing them the district which had 
suffered in the great conflagration, and many points of interest 
from the great shell road and handsome homes to the curios in the 
"alligator store," and " ostrich farm.". 

They called on Mr. Aird, in his bank, Mr. Fletcher in his law 
office and Mr. Russell, who showed them all through his new and 
handsome office, where the Metropolis is printed. 

One evening was spent as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Russell, 
and Miss Bertie seemed to be very happy in her new and handsome 
home. To these and all the friends in Jacksonville and its vicinity 
the ability to gracefully dispense hospitality has been given in a 
special manner. 

On the steamer " Arapahoe," the travellers said farewell to the 
Jacksonville friends, and then passing down the beautiful St. John's 
and out into the ocean, they returned to Salem by way of Charles- 
ton and Columbia. At the latter place they were entertained at the 
home of Mrs. Georgia Bowie Wright and although Mrs Wright was 
absent, the friends were most cordial in their reception. The only 
regret at Columbia was that the stay was so short. 

After a few days spent in needed rest Dr. and Mrs. Clewell 
began the second stage of their summer visits, going first to Dur- 
ham. Mrs. Norton and Miss Vivian had arranged for a meeting 
of the Alumnae, at their residence, and the following friends gath- 
ered in the evening, notwithstanding- the storm that was raging at 
the time. Mr. and Mrs. Leo D. Heart (Annie Dewey), Miss Joe 
Taylor, Miss Lizzie Conrad, Miss Willie Smith, Miss Vivian Nor- 
ton, Mrs. W. L Wall, Mrs. Ada M. Smith, Mrs. Lelia G. Davis, 
Miss Lila Markbam and Mrs. C. H. Norton. After enjoying some 
time in social converse, the ladies organized a Branch Alumnae 
Association, with the following officers : President, Mrs. Fuller ; 
Vice President, Miss Joe Taylor; Secretary and Treasurer, Miss 
Vivian Norton. The following morning a pleasant drive was given 
the visitors b) r Mrs Smith and Miss Willie. Owing to a misunder- 
standing they failed to see Mrs. Warren, as they understood that 
she had left town with Miss Bessie 

A short ride brought the travellers to Goldsboro, where Mr. 
and Mrs. Dewey and Miss Hannah entertained them in their home. 
In addition to the utmost personal attention, Mrs. Dewey arranged 
a reception of the former pupils at which there were present Misses 
Julia Herring, Mary Wright and Clyde Peacock, Mrs. M. Wither- 



The Academy. 2183 

ington, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Siddall, Mrs. Agnes Stallings Bridgers, 
and Mrs. Bessie Pegram Powers. They had the pleasure of greet- 
ing Messrs. Borden and Miller, and with the opening of school 
Miss Rachel Borden has joined our numbers. 

At Wilmington, Mrs. Harper and Miss Lousie were waiting for 
the visitors, and a little while only was needed to make them feel at 
home. Miss Chitty was their guest at this time, and in this little 
sketch it will be impossible to fully describe the programme 
of the days in Wilmington, with its rides and drives, on land and 
on the Cape Fear river. Part of the time was spent as the guest of 
Dr. and Mrs. Bullock, and the visitors weie happy thus to spend 
some time with Miss Maud in her home. Mrs. Harper had called 
a meeting of the former Academy girls in Wilmington, and the 
following was the list : Mrs. Ella Sirupc Harper, Miss Louise 
Harper, Miss Emma Chitty, Mrs. Katie Bell O' Berry, Mrs. Thos. 
Cooper, (Miss Ella Strupe, formerly of Clemmonsville, N. C) Miss 
Janie Wood, Miss Lucy Chadbourn, Mrs. Clarabell Moore 
Mrs. F. W. Foster (Gertrude Hall), Mrs. A. Howell, (Gertrude 
Jenkins) and Miss Maud Bullock. Several of these friends were not 
present at the meeting, but some called on Dr. and Mrs. Clewell 
later. The Branch Alumnae Association was organized by the 
election of the following officers : President, Mrs. Howell ; Vice 
President, Mrs. Harper ; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. Foster. 

Continuing the journey, a day was pleasantly spent in Wilson, 
at Miss Bessie Gold's home. Some of the Wilson girls met us at 
Goldsboro, and some were away from home. But Mrs. Gold and 
Miss Bessie had a full day's programme, and it was thoroughly en- 
joyed. Among the pleasures was a short visit to Dr. and Mrs. 
Herring. 

At Washington, N. C, Lucille and Bessie Nicholson were at 
the station, and Dr. and Mrs. Nicholson's home was ablaze with 
light and good cheer as they drove to the front door in the evening. 
Mrs. Judge Brown and Mrs Ellison and other alumnae were away 
from home, and therefore the time was given to drives, to pleasant 
walks and to the enjoyment of the social converse with friends and 
neighbors who kindly called. At that time the travellers did not 
know that Muse Blount would later be a member of our School 
family, so did not have the pleasure of a visit to her home ; nor did 
they succeed in visiting Dr. Nicholson in Bath, though they already 
knew that Blanche would come to Salem in September. 



2184 The Academy. 

A pleasant ride on the narrow gauge railroad and down the 
river finally brought them to Elizabeth City, though with great 
regret Edenton had to be passed by, owing to appointments which 
could not be changed and a miscalculation in the schedule. It 
seemed like reaching home when they came to Dr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Mullan's residence and found them waiting, with Mary arid Fannie 
just as cordial as ever. A launch ride was given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Foreman, a drive by Mr. and Mrs. McMullan, they were dined 
by Mr. and Mrs. Wood and Mr. and Mrs. Hughes. A pleasant 
evening was spent with Mary Culpepper and her parents, and alto- 
gether the Elizabeth City visit was just as bright and happy as 
could be. 

In Norfolk, Ida May Drew anrl her father awaited them, and 
though the time was not as long as the travellers would have liked 
it to have been, still the hospitality was so warm and the ride down 
to the seaside so delightful that the Norfolk day will always be a 
pleasant remembrance. 

A quiet, pleasant Sunday with Viola Saunders and her parents 
concluded this second stage of the summer's visit. Suffolk is an 
interesting town, and the cordiality of the entertainers only added 
to the enjoyment. This happy sojourn with Mr. and Mrs. Saun- 
ders was a pleasant close to a delightful series of visits and from 
Suffolk they returned home. 

The last vist was to Asheville. The Blue Ridge Branch Asso- 
ciation met at the home of Mrs. Bernard and spent an enjoyable 
hour. The centennial was discussed as well as the bright pros- 
pects of the new year. Asheville now sends nearly a dozen pupils 
to Salem, and the homes of all these as well as those of former 
pupils were visited. If the zeal of the Asheville friends could be 
implanted into every Alumnae circle, the trustees would soon be 
required to add new buildings to provide for the pupils 

From the foregoing sketch it will be seen that the journey by 
Mr. and Mrs. Clewell was one of the most thorough and extended 
visits thus lar made. It enabled them to meet parents and pupils 
in their homes, and thus the duties to these pupils during this year 
will be more fully carried out. It brought them in contact with 
new pupils who cime to Salem feeling that they had friends here 
awaiting their arrival. It made new friends for the future. It more 
fully organized the Alumnae in important centers. Altogether it 
was a most important journey, although the intense heat and the 
risks of extended summer travel made it a most difficult one. 



The Academy. 2185 

Among the Alumnae. 



BY MISS LEHMAN. 



The large company of Alumnae so happily present at our late 
Academy Centennial, whom we were so glad to see, is far exceeded 
by the still larger number of those who wanted to come, and were 
prevented by unavoidable engagements and occupations. Among 
them we note a few from letters handed to us by Miss Maria Vogler, 
of Salem, in answer to her invitations to be present on that delight- 
ful occasion. 

Gussie Lamkin was one of these old friends who would have 
been so happy to come, but could not on account of teaching occu- 
pations. Her husband, Mr. C. A. Boyd, of Summit, Miss., died 
suddenly about two years ago Gfussie then took up her old teaching 
work, which she had so successfully followed for 13 years, before her 
marriage. 

Eliza Barr, of that little Mississippi coterie, is now Mrs. Stuart 
Oglesby, of Hope, Ark. Lucy Statham, Mrs. Win, Coombs, died 
several years ago. Annie Boyd is Mrs. Woodson Atkinson, of Sum- 
mit, and has two fine buys Miss Helen de Schweinitz was the only 
member of that group of friends able to be here. 

The Malone sisters so affectionately remembered here, as refu- 
gees during the late Civil War, also responded most cordially. Lucie 
is Mrs. J. N Thompson, of Tuscumbia, Ala , who had hoped in 
attending a meeting of Daughters of the Revolution, at Wilmington, 
N. C, to come by Salem, but was prevented. We sympathize deeply 
with her sister Sallie, Mrs. Sarah Harris Field, of Columbus, Miss., 
who is heart broken over the death of her grown son and daughter of 
consumption. Her husband was the son of an old Academy girl, 
Sarah Harris, a pupil of the long ago. 

Miss Vogler also kindly gave us items of interest from the 
Weatherly's ; Josie Weatherly, Mrs. Carter, of Montgomery, Ala. , 
was married in 1873, nas ^ ve children all grown but one 10 years of 
age. Her oldest daughter is a fine vocalist and supports herself well 
by her magnificent voice; another is a teacher in the city schools; 
one son is in the railroad service and another is an architect. Occa- 
sionally in Mrs Carter's visits to Atlanta, she sees Mrs. Clara D. 
McLean, who is still bright and interesting as ever. Josie's sister, 
Tommy Jane, was recently widowed the second time. She first mar- 
ried Mr. McLaurin ; her eldest son is Senator McLaurin, so promi- 
nent in South Carolina affairs. Her second husband was Mr W S. 



2186 The Academy. 

Merony, of Englewood, N. J., where she still resides. Sallie Weath- 
erly is Mrs. T. E. Crosland, of Bennettsville, S. C. 

Lou Mayo, Mrs. Sherrod, (of 1864) of Hamilton, N. C, would 
also have been pleased to be here. Rusha and Mary Sherrod her two 
nieces who were pupils last year are again with us. Bettie Sherrod 
(Mrs. Bryan) and her daughter, Mrs. Braswell, were both here, and we 
enjoyed seeing them greatly. 

Eugenia Wall Dunlap, of Cedar Hill, N. C, in acknowledging 
her invitation, spoke beautifully of that other meeting, where, we 
trust, none of us will be wanting — beside the still waters of the River 
of Life. What a reunion that will be ! of which this one was but a 
very faint type. 

^T We are very pleased to note the successful work of one of our 
talented pupils of some years ago, Miss Lafayette McLaws, originally 
of Augusta, Ga. She is now in Washington, D. C , filling a respon- 
sible position. Her work " When the Land was Young," takes a 
different trend from most tales of our early history. It is styled the 
true romance of Mistress Antoinette Huguenin and Captain Jack 
Middleton, in the days of the Buccaneers. The cruelties of the 
Spaniards ol the early days of St. Augustine, are graphically por- 
trayed, their treachery to both Indians and English settlers is given 
in terse and forceful language. The descriptions of the great Choc- 
taw temple with its roof of polished shells, closely fitted together, 
the great chests of pearls, and finely dressed skins, and the bones of 
a hundred chiefs are finely drawn. The sufferings of Capt. Jack 
Middleton in the great iron torture cage of St. Augustine, and his 
release by Mistress Antoinette Huguenin, masquerading as a gay 
young French officer, her own brother, all add verve and interest to 
the work. 

— We were very pleased to receive a neatly bound copy of 
"Songs from Carolina Hills," a collection of poems of some 68 or 
70 pages from the hand of one of our talented pupils of several years 
ago, Miss Lucille Armfield, of N. C. 

Among these poems we note one " On the unveiling of the 
Mecklenburg Monument, May 29, 1898," "The Making of a Poet," 
" Carpe Diem," " Two Lullabies," one from the Overman of Emanuel 
Geibel, "The Maiden from the Far Country," from the German of 
Schiller and others. 

We know no greater joy than thus to hear of the gcod work our 
girls are doing in the intellectual arena as well as in the domestic or 
social circle. 



The Academy. 2187 

— A handsome volume was sent to us entitled, "Jezebel," 
a work of fiction based on the life of King Ahab's wicked queen. 
This is the second book of the gifted author, Lafayette McLaws, 
also a pupil of years ago, of whom we are so justly proud. We are 
glad to know that in the great intellectual strife of our day our girls 
stand in the front rank. 

— Another Alumna of the Academy is engaged on a book which 
we hope to review in the near future, End so the grand work goes on. 

Mrs. Rankin, of Asheville, N. C. , is as far as we know, the 
oldest living Alumna of the Salem Academy and College. She is 
registered here as "No. 105 1, Elizabeth Rodeman, 1824." She is 
now 91 years of age, a remarkably intelligent, well preserved old 
lady, interested in all the questions of the present day. 

— Mr. Piohl is this year assisted in his office by Miss Emma 
Stafford, who is at the same time pursuing certain studies within 
the school. 

— Several recent graduates have registered their names with 
us for positions and we will be glad to correspond with parties de- 
siring teachers, either in homes or in schools. 

— Miss Ackerman has taken charge of the interests of the 
Elocution work, and has gathered about her quite a large class. 
She is filled with enthusiasm as she comes to us fresh from her work 
in New York City. 

— The list of teachers who have the Preparatory and the Aca- 
demic studies in charge this year is as follows : Dr. Clewell, Bishop 
Rondthaler, Misses Lehman, L. Shaffner, S. Shaffner, Chitty, Bes- 
sent, Bonney, Jones, Heisler, C. Vest, M. Lewis, Butner, Greider, 
Meinung, Spease, McKinney, Barrow and Traxler. 

— The room companies are arranged for the year as follows : 
Miss Lehman has charge of the two Senior Room Companies ; Miss 
L. C. Shaffner and Miss Carrie Vest the Juniors ; Miss L. Heisler 
and Miss Janie Lewis the Park Hall Room Company ; Miss Sallie 
Shaffner and Miss Mary Greider have the care of the Fourth Room; 
Miss Butner and Miss Spease the Fifth Room ; Miss Mamie Lewis 
and Miss McKinney the Sixth Room ; Miss Chitty and Miss Barrow 



2 1 88 The Academy. 

the Ninth Room ; Miss Bessent and Miss Rights the Tenth Room; 
Miss Query the Day School Department. 

— Our Music Department has witnessed some changes. Prof. 
Shirley still has charge, and has more thoroughly organized the 
work than ever before. Miss Morrison is leading the Vocal De- 
partment, and the following is the list of those who assist in the 
music instruction : Misses S Vest, Rights, Jeter, J. Lewis, John- 
ston, Van Vleck and Mrs. H. E. Rondthaler. 

— As noted elsewhere, Miss Siedenberg, a graduate of the 
Royal Institute, Vienna, has taken charge of the Studio, and has 
organized classes in oil and water colors, in drawing, in china paint- 
ing and in painting on glass. The students sketch from nature, 
making trips into the neighborhood. A visit to the Studio reveals 
a busy scene. 

— About two weeks after the opening of School, Miss Sieden- 
berg made an exhibit of her art work, in the Library. The exhibit 
consisted of a number of pictures in oil and water colors, and a 
large collection of china and glass. All of this work was very fine, 
and the glass was specially attractive because it was a new kind of 
work in our community. The specimens reminded us of the beau- 
tiful glass work seen in Venice. Miss Siedenberg has a number of 
medals won by her work at Chicago, Charleston and elsewhere. 

— Miss La Porte, after spending the summer in superintend- 
ing certain work in the Knoxville Summer School, has begun her 
work in the French Department. A number of pupils are prepar- 
ing to do special advanced work this year, and their progress will 
be watched with great interest. 

— The Industrial Department is this year in charge of Miss 
Query and Miss Bessent. The former has a large class in Cooking 
in South Hall, and the latter has arranged a very neat and attract- 
ive room in Annex Hall, where she will teach sewing, cutting, 
fitting and dress making. 

— Miss Henderson spent the summer with friends, and has re- 
turned fresh and happy to cheer and care for the ills of the pupils. 
The infirmary has become quite famous, not because of the care of 
the sick so much as from the fact that it prevents sickness. Miss 
Henderson has a small but very enthusiastic class in the study of 
the " care of the sick." This class is not as large as it should be y 



The Academy. 2189 

since no more important branch can be taught than that which pre- 
pares girls to intelligently care for the lighter cases of illness in 
their families in later life. We commend this study to our patrons 
and advise them to confer with their daughters with a view to be- 
ginning the study of the ' ' care of the sick. ' ' 

— The Commercial Department, both in Book-keeping and 
Shorthand, has a number of pupils pursuing the course. Miss L. 
C. Shaffner has the former in hand, Miss Query has the latter. 

— Dr. Clewell's birthday was celebrated with the usual festivities. 
The weather was ideal, the ride to the park and through Winston- 
Salem was greatly enjoyed, the dinner was of course as popular as 
any part of the day, and in the evening Mr. Sigg, Superintendent 
of the Electric Light Company, brought his kinetescope to the 
Chapel, and gave the pupils an hour of enjoyment in looking at 50 
of the wonders of the world, and this was followed by an hour's 
pleasure with moving pictures, which could be described as " some 
of the funniest things in the world." The Principal was the reci- 
pient of a number of kind remembrances, among them a handsome 
set of library shelves from the friends in the school. 



JBartirtr. 



Shipp — Crouse. — On September 17th. 1902, in Lincolnton, N. C, Mr. 
Bartlett Shipp to Miss Prue Crouse The groom is a brother of Lieut. 
Wm. E. Shipp, who was at one time a member of our Academy Faculty, 
and was later killed at San Juan, in the Spanish American War. 

Shepherd— Reid. — In May, Mr. Oscar Shepherd, of Waughtown, 
N. C, to Miss Annie Reid. ' - 

Garrett — Borum. — On June 4th, in Ruffin, N. C , Rev. James Alfred 
Garrett to Miss Maggie Borum. 

Watkins— Montague.— On June 24th, Dr. Conrad Watkins to Miss 
Irene Montague, both of Winston, N. C. 

Gramling— Satterfield.— On June 24th. in Atlanta, Ga , Mr. Wil- 
liam R. Gramling to Miss Annie B. Satterfield 

Haas — Osterbind — On June 25th, in Laurel St., Methodist Church, 
Richmond, Va., Mr. William Frederick Haas to Miss Mary Osterbind. 

Cotter — Burson. — On July 9th, in Tampa, Fla., Mr. Leroy Cotter 
to Miss Amy Burson 



21 tea. 



[ones —In Maccn, Ga , April 26111, Mrs. Zeta Rogers Jones. 



2190 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston- alem. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2191 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say. - 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about your people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W. Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says: " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 
By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
Printed by Doubleday, /'age& Co , New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

The finisned book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
receive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLEE & SON, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



2192 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL, 



We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line of 

... : ...^OTIO^S,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 



The Academy. 2193 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 

HUSH H MOST IIP 10 DATE LIS 

we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

V 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES - 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair ot them. 

ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



2194 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

OAK BIDGE, JV. C. 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSohool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last y^ar. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J, A. & M. H. HOLT, Prins. 



When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 
• 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful out door 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomely illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARTH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the iechnical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham SchooM902-03 

Located on tbe Asheville Plateau sinC3 1891. Military . U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented tin's year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office, Asheville, N. C. 



The Academy. 2195 






WINSTON-SAX.EM, N C. 

PLITMBEE, 

TINNEE, 
COENTOE "WOKKEK. 



§OUTf)CRl^RAILlMY. 

The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, P. R. DARBY, — — ~ 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N. C C.P.& T.A.,Ashevlile N.C 

FRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARDWICK 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D. C • 



2196 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lightijg, heating and ventilation; 
thoroughly equi) perl in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduate from Classical Course enter State University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogus. 

JAS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 




YOU 


IP 


WANT 




THE 


SO 


SHOE 




THAT'S 


SEE 


ALL 




THE 


US 


GO? 




HI©©iy & ©I 


9 ttt©e> 


WINSTON 




N. C. 





hotel ctohsties- 

J. L. JONEfS, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DA.Y. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference Salem Female Academy 



THE AC ADEMY^ 

Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C, October, 1902. No. 22; 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



ISiritottal. 



— With October 31 our Alma Mater, Salem Academy and Col- 
lege completed, a well-rounded century of scholastic work. Who 
can estimate the far-reaching influences of its work thus set in mo- 
tion, and going on and on uninterruptedly for one hundred years ! 
We generally celebrate the 31st as Founder's Day, but this 
year we anticipated it somewhat on the 21st, — partly owing to Dr. 
Clewell's intended visit north, and partly to the unusually fine, 
bracing weather which could not reasonably be expected to con- 
tinue much longer. So we spent an ideally beautiful holiday in 
Nissen Park, going out in the street cars at 10 o'clock a. m., and 
returning at 4:40, as happy a company as one ever sees. 



— The Federation of Women's Clubs of North Carolina met in 
Winston-Salem on October 7-9, holding their business meetings 
in the Academy Chapel. By the courteous invitation of the Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Lindsay Patterson, the members of the school were 
invited to attend the sessions. A large number of girls and teach- 
ers availed themselves of the invitation, and gained clearer views of 
the great onward movement of women in the 20th century. Mrs. 
Chas. Mclver, of the State Normal and an old Academy girl, read 
a strong, thoughtful paper on the improvement and beautifying of 
public school houses in the country. Miss Poppenheim, of South 
Carolina, gave a logical, well-considered account of the various 



2198 The Academy. 

lines of work now carried on. Mrs. Letitia M. Walker told us 
much of the workings of the Ladies' Mt. Vernon Association, from 
its inception to the present time, and other papers of note were 
communicated. Mrs. Clewell gave the ladies and their friends a 
pleasing informal reception in the Academy Chapel after a com- 
plimentary Musicale tendered by Prof. Shirley and the Academy 
Faculty on Oct. 7th., 



— Dr. Clewell left Salem, Oct. 23, on the invitation of the Fac- 
ulty of Princeton University, as the representative of our College 
at the inauguration of Dr. Woodrow Wilson, the new President. 
We are also specially interested in his wife, Mrs. Wilson, who 
sends a ward as a pupil to the Academy at this time. 

The inauguration took place on Oct. 25, and was an event of 
great significance from the fact that Dr. Wilson, the 13th President 
of Princeton, is the first layman ever chosen for that high office. 
He is a historian of note, as well as an all-round literary man. Ex- 
President Cleveland delivered an address on behalf of the Trustees. 
Ex-President Patton gave a retiring address, and Dr. Wilson his 
inaugural as he took the oath of office and assumed his responsible 
duties. 

It was a notable occasion, bringing together as it did some of 
our most distinguished men, for among the Alumni of Princeton 
are some of our most noted literary men, jurists, statesmen, divines 
and scholars in general. The University celebrated its sesqui-cen- 
ennial in 1896. 



— Our Moravian settlement here in North Carolina will celebrate 
its sesqui-centennial in 1903. As the historic stone tells us which 
stands beside the Bethabara church the first settlers arrived there 
November 13, 1753. 



— Dr. Clewell visited Bryn Mawr, the Woman's College of Bal- 
timore and other institutions during his absence, in order to arrange 
terms of affiliation and to come into closer relations with them. 



— The 89th Presbyterian Synod of North Carolina held its ses- 
sions in Winston-Salem during the week Oct. 22-25. The Acad- 



The Academy. 2199 

emy gave its members a complimentary Musicale on the afternoon 
of Oct. 24 in the Chapel, after which, attended by ladies of Win- 
ston, teachers and members of the Junior and Senior Classes of the 
school these distinguished gentlemen were escorted through the 
college buildings and campus, the Archive House, and other points 
of interest. We do not often see a finer looking, intellectual body 
of men. A large number of them took part in the Annual Love- 
feast of the Woman's Missionary Society of Salem on Oct. 25. On 
the following Sabbath all the pulpits of Winston-Salem were filled 
by these visiting Presbyterian divines. Rev. Dr. Rhodes, of Lau- 
rinburg, N. C. , filled the pulpit of the Moravian church in the 
morning, and Dr. Vardell, of Red Springs Seminary, at night. 



— A very commendable spirit of improvement is animating the 
Junior and Senior Classes in the line of composition or essay writ- 
ing ; the spirit of keeping everlastingly at it is the only sure road 
to success tnere as elsewhere. 



— Bishop Rondthaler returned from an extended visit of three 
months to Europe on Oct. 16, and was greeted with much affection 
by the great Academy family to whom he is so dear. A special 
service oi welcome was held by the school on the evening of Oct. 
19 in addition to our usual Sunday vesper service. The Junior 
and Senior classes, with whom he is especially connected in college 
work, each rendered a special hymn on the happy occasion. 



— As Sunday, Oct. 19, was the 25th anniversary of Bishop Rond- 
thaler's pastorate in Salem, the services of the day were held in 
special reference to that event, as well as a greeting to him after his 
long absence. At an early hour the church band awakened him 
with sweet strains of sacred music. At 11 o'clock as the Bishop 
entered the church with his ministerial brethren, the congregation 
rose and sang " Now let us praise the Lord." After the opening 
exercises, participated in by Rev. 's Clewell, Hall and McCuiston, 
Rev. E. S. Crosland welcomed the Bishop with pleasing and appro- 
priate words. Dr. Rondthaler preached the sermon, one of great 
tenderness and affection. At 3 o'clock p. m., a lovefeast was 



2200 The Academy. 

served, and addresses made by different ministers, thus closing a 
happy day. The Doctor left Salem early in July, making a jour- 
ney of io,ooo miles over land and sea in the interest of the South- 
ern Moravian Church. He seems refreshed in body and mind, and 
we trust he will long be spared to us. 

— The great Coal Strike has at length been ended, to the relief 
of all, both rich and poor. Suffering must come of it in our large 
cities, it cannot be otherwise : but we at least have great cause to 
be thankful that the supply of coal laid in for the school was suffi- 
cient to tide us over the winter. Our coal wagons were going back 
and forth incessantly for weeks, so that we needed not to be anx- 
ious over results as far as we were concerned. 



— We are specially glad to note the addition of a Hesperian and 
Euterpean department to The Academy. It will stimulate our 
girls to renewed literary effort, and will give that spice of variety 
which is absolutely essential in a school journal. 



— An interesting volume has been handed us for our Academy 
Library, entitled "Memorials of the Huguenots," by Rev. A. 
Stapleton, of Carlisle. Pa. It gives an account of the Revocation 
of the Edict of Nantes, the consequent establishing of colonies in 
other countries, their influence on American statesmen, soldiers 
and educators. 

Among those who came to the New World we find the ancestors 
of the DeSchweinitz family. We are told that after the revocation 
of the Edict of Nantes which drove the best element of French 
working citizens into other lands a Huguenot family, named Le 
Doux, fled to Stettin, in Prussia, and suffered terribly as the result 
of their faith. A descendant, Amalie LeDoux, married Rev. Louis 
David de Schweinitz, in 1S12, with whom she came to America. 
They were the great-grandparents of the present DeSchweinitz 
family. We find from this book how closely the Huguenots and 
Moravians were drawn together suffering for a common cause. 

Another French Moravian family in Northampton County, Pa., 
is the Clewell family : one branch went to Switzerland ; one family 
fled from Dauphine to Auerbach in Baden at the revocation. One, 
Francois, married Louisa Frache, of Geneva, and had two sons, 



The Academy. 2201 

Francis and George. Being a second time a widow, she and her 
sons came to Philadelphia. Francis married Salome Kuechleen, 
and they were the direct ancestors of the present Clewell family in 
Pennsylvania and North Carolina. The early history of all these 
people was one of suffering for the faith that was once delivered to 
the saints. 



— Among new books added to the Library during the past weeks 
we have " Dorothy Vernon." by Charles Major ; " The Virgin- 
ian." by Owen Wister ; "The Mississippi Bubble," by Emerson 
Hough ; "The Hound of the Baskervilles," by A. .Conan Doyle ; 
"Captain Macklin ;" "The Speckled Bird," Mrs. Wilson ; "The 
Leopard's Spots," Dixon " The Virginian " is so popular we had 
to order a second copy to supply the urgent demand. Of the 
many works of fiction thrown upon an unsuspecting public during 
the last five years " The Right of Way," by Sir Gilbert Parker ; 
"David Harum ;" " The Virginian " and "To Have and To Hold " 
will probably hold the market longest Most of the others are 
ephemeral, born but to die, and dying is, perhaps, the best service 
they can render to humanity. 



Art in the Home. 

Music and Art are sisters ; most divine when they greet us in 
perfect harmony. 

If you enter a beautiful cathedral, where the light falls in soft 
tones through the stained glass windows, our souls are at once up- 
lifted and we feel the presence of God ; if then the sweet strains of 
music fill the solemn halls, it seems as though God was speaking 
to us in his mercy and infinite love. Music reaches the most secret 
feelings of our heart better than words can do. Art is mute ; — still 
by her sublime beauty she offers us a source of constant enjoyment. 

The refining influence of music and art in education is very im- 
portant. Music is fostered in many a home, while often the edu- 
cation in art is utterly neglected. Is it because music is the more 
demonstrative of the two sisters that she has so many followers? 

Still there is much in favor to devote ourselves to the study of 
the beautiful. Our eyes are opened ; we learn to see. Nature 



2202 The Academy. 

begins to speak to us in a glorious language. We take a deeper 
delight in the treasures of art. And how much can true art do 
to beautify a home ! Well understood, true art ; — for to smear 
on canvass or china is not beautifying a home. It is to the neglect 
of this important branch in education that we see so much poor and 
hideous work, that would have been better undone. 

For, to accomplish anything beautiful, one has to work for it ; — 
even the most talented has to work for it. There must be a good 
foundation in the study of art as well as in music, and this founda- 
tion is drawing. A child ought to be trained in drawing as well as 
in music, and ought to be encouraged if it shows talent for it. It . 
is an important- thing to find out which gifts Nature has given to a 
child, and to develop those gifts to the best advantage. Many an 
hour, many a year of labor is devoted to the study of music ; 
surely, it will be amply repaid if talent and work go hand in hand ; 
but not so if a child has no liking, no talent for music ; those years 
of drudging labor will be lost. This child might have a decided 
talent for painting ; and if she grows to be a woman she will drop 
her music and set to work with paints and brushes. But she goes 
about it like a child, for she does not know the beginning of an art 
that is difficult. How can she render the beauty of a rose, how 
can she model a human face, if she understands nothing about light 
and shade? How can she do some really beautiful decorative 
work if her hand and eye have not been trained to execute what is 
perhaps well enough in her conception ? 

If she will go back to the beginning of the work, she still may 
make a success of it, but what a pity that her natural gift was not 
developed in time. Why is it that so many students of the art 
class like to work over their time? Because they have the natural 
gift for the work, and therefore the work is pleasure. Those quiet 
hours spent in the studio will ever be cherished in memory from 
the first struggle with a cast to successful studies from nature. 

In my experience as a teacher I found that the Southern girl has 
a fine sense for line and color, and a ready understanding for the 
truly beautiful. Give her a chance ; try to develop in your daugh- 
ters the gifts that God has given them to best advantage. 

The gift to create something beautiful, be it on canvass, glass or 
any other material, the gift to truly beautify a home is a great 
source of happiness and contentment and worth to the developed. 

Anna Siedenburg. 



The Academy. 2203 

President Woodrow Wilson's Inauguration at 

Princeton. 



My dear Miss Lehman : 

In response to your request to furnish an account of the in- 
auguration of Dr. Wilson, at Princeton, I send the following sketch 
of our pleasant visit to the old University town on that happy 
occasion. 

Princeton is about an hour's ride from Philadelphia, and three or 
four miles from the main line of the Pennsylvania Railroad between 
New York and Philadelphia. It is 10 miles from Trenton, N. J. 
We left Salem Thursday afternoon, and by 2 o'clock, Friday after- 
noon, were in the office of the Secretary of the University, discuss- 
ing the weighty question of costumes, line of march, place of meet- 
ing, and kindred topics for the inauguration ceremony. These 
details were of prime importance, for as it was in the, parable of 
the " wedding garment " in the New Testament, so there would be 
no place for the guest in the procession without the classic cap and 
gown. These details arranged, we went to our room in Nassau 
Hotel, as the University had prepared entertainment for its specially 
invited guests, a courtesy which was greatly appreciated in view of 
the fact that the crowds were far in excess of the ability of the 
Princeton hotels to care for. 

Saturday, Oct. 25th, dawned bright and clear. Princeton has 
one of the finest locations of any of the great Universities. The 
buildings are grouped together on the large campus so as to pro- 
duce the finest impression upon the visitor, and this impression is 
always pleasing, whether one gazes upon old Nassau Hall, or the 
Society Halls with their Greek style of architecture, or upon the 
more recent Blair or Little Halls, with the imposing castle-entrance 
and their continental university style of architecture. Add to these 
features the beautiful autumn tints of the foliage, the richly -colored 
leaves of the vines covering the stone buildings, the vast stretches 
of green sward and the bright sunshine, and had you been present 
you would have agreed with us that it was a fitting day to install 
this brilliant and brainy young Southerner in the President's chair 
of one of the greatest universities of the land. 

The inauguration ceremonies took place in Alexander Hall, a 
beautiful and imposing structure. One of the features of the occa- 
sion was the Academic procession. The guests were arranged in 



2204 The Academy. 

a number of divisions, each division with its marshals, and each 
member dressed in the classic cap and gown. The sober black of 
the costumes was enlivened by the bright colors of the Doctors' 
hoods, which hung from the shoulders upon the wearer's back and 
was lined with his particular college colors. In the academic pro- 
cession, which numbered many hundreds of men, the first division 
consisted of president-elect Wilson, ex-president Patton, ex-presi- 
dent Grover Cleveland, the Governor of New Jersey, Dr. Henry 
Van Dyke, the Bishop of Washington and a few others. 

The second division consisted of one hundred and fifty college 
men, all of whom were heads of institutions, north, south, east and 
west. These were arranged strictly according to the age of the 
school, and in this respect Salem's one hundred years gave her 
representative the 37th place in the line. This secured an advanta- 
geous place on the platform, with the privilege of studying a host 
of distinguished faces in such numbers that a like opportunity 
comes only now and then in a lifetime. 

The third division was made up of distinguished invited guests, 
and some idea will be gained of who these men were when we 
name such as J. Pierpont Morgan, ex-speaker Thomas B. Reed, 
Mark Twain, Robert Ogden, and many more could be added. 

Then followed the one hundred and more Professors in Princeton y 
and after them the former students. 

The long procession moved from its starting-point at Dodge 
Hall, through a solid line of spectators, to Alexander Hall. The 
latter seats only about 1200 persons, so that none save those in the 
procession, and a few invited guests, together with the ladies whose 
position entitled them to places, gained entrance. 

The exercises were simple but very impressive. The two vocal 
selections were: " Veni Creator Spiritus " and ''Ein Feste Burg 
ist unser Gott." The Governor of New Jersey presided. Dr. Van 
Dyke lead in prayer. Ex-President Patton spoke as the retiring 
President. Ex -President Grover Cleveland spoke for the Trustees. 

Dr. Wilson was called upon to take the oath, and to him were 
delivered the keys of the University as a symbol of his authority. 
The new President's inaugural address was a conservative and 
scholarly effort, and was the last on the programme. 

The afternoon witnessed the great football game between Prince- 
ton and Columbia, which resulted in a decided victory for the 
former. 



The Academy. 2205 

President and Mrs. Wilson held a formal reception from 4 to 6 
o'clock at their home. 

Sunday morning Ex -President Patton preached to the students 
in the University Chapel. 

By special invitation we remained in Princeton over Sunday, 
and in company with Prof. Skilton, called upon Dr. and Mrs. 
Wilson. The hour spent in their home was a delightful social 
close to this formal .visit. The three young daughters in the family 
were introduced, the Doctor's library inspected, the beautiful views 
from the windows were admired, and altogether the visit was 
greatly enjoyed. 

This letter is intended to cover only the Princeton visit, and is 
but a brief outline of that. Next month we will tell of our visit to 
the several schools and colleges in other localities, and of the pleas- 
ant sojourn in the homes of half a score and more of our pupils. 

John H. Clewell. 



<Kf)wmicle anfc (©flsstj). 



— The two Chizmans, Pattie and Pescud, in a recent visit home 
were in a railroad wreck near Pine Hall, where the consequences 
might have been serious. We hope Pescud is recovering from her 
illness, and they may soon be with us again. 

—A neat series of Academy Souvenir Postal Cards have been 
issued by the Alumnae Association, and can be obtained at the 
Academy office. There are three sets, one giving a pretty view of 
the campus with the fountain, another the Avenue, and still another 
the Church. 

— Dr. Clewell has contributed a booklet, entitled "Moravian 
Settlement in North Carolina," to the series of North Carolina 
booklets published in Raleigh by the Daughters of the Revolution, 
in order to bring out the interesting incidents of our history more 
prominently. These booklets are ten cents each, or one dollar per 
year. One issue in May describes the Ku Klux Klan ; a later one, 
the Indian Massacre and Tuscarora War, the Battle of Guilford 
Court House, and other events. 

— The Academy circle prayer- meeting was begun September 24, 
with 17 members, and every Wednesday morning since that time 



2206 The Academy. 

from 20 to 25 girls have met in the vestry for a brief prayer service 
immediately after breakfast. A special blessing attends this simple 
meeting, and all who attend go away reireshed and strengthened. 

— On October 13, Mr. Sigg, Superintendent of the Electric Light 
Company, gave us another of his instructive and entertaining ex- 
hibits in the Academy chapel. This time he illustrated the story, 
"The Sign of the Cross," with a series of beautiful pictures, fol- 
lowed by a set of moving scenes for the amusement of the gathered 
company. He has thus favored us at different times, and we are 
very grateful to him for his kindness. 

— Extensive changes have been made in the Laboratory. The 
floor at the east end has been raised to a level with the door, and 
a large space made available that some 20 pupils may be doing 
regular laboratory work without incommoding the rest of the class 
or each other. 

— The Junior Naturalists' Club has been organized for the year 
with the following officers : President, Cassandra Vaughn ; Vice 
President, Alice Little ; Secretary, Grace Rothrock ; Treasurer, 
Trula Miller. Their first batch of letters to Uncle John (Mr. John 
W. Spencer, of Cornell University, Superintendent of Nature Study 
in New York) was sent on, and we received a cordial, hearty res- 
ponse from him. 

— Several of the fine, century-old sycamores in the square in 
front of the Academy have died, and had to be cut down. We 
feel sorry for those grand old monarchs thus laid low. 

— A total eclipse of the Moon, on the night of October 16-17, 
was watched with great interest by quite a number of sophomores, 
whose Astronomy lessons have specially interested them in that 
line. Some sat up until 2 o'clock a. m. to see the dark earth 
shadow move away from Madame Luna. 

— The Seniors elected their officers the first week in October, as 
follows : President, Kate Kilbuck ; Vice President, Carrie Ogburn ; 
Secretary, Pauline Sessoms ; Treasurer, Ada Petway ; Poet, May 
McMinn ; Historian, Sadie Rollins. The meeting was harmonious, 
the choice met with general approval, and from the manner in 
which the class is formulating, we anticipate a good class, of good 
leaders for the year. 



The Academy. 2207 

— The little mischief-making god of love has been particularly 
busy this fall, and marriages are coming in almost as rapidly as we 
can chronicle them. 

We are very pleased to welcome Hazel Dooley to Winston-Salem 
as Mrs. Geo. Norfieet, while we are sorry to see Bessie Gray leave 
us for a northern home as Mrs. Chas. Plumley. 

— The tenth room is unusually large this term ; so many little 
girls, as lively and alert as crickets, form quite a pleasing pictnre. 
If they do not represent perpetual motion they come as near to it 
as can possibly be done at this time. 



The First Page from the History of the Junior Class, 1902. 



BY AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY. 



On the 6th of October, 1902, great excitement prevailed in the 
Junior Class Room, for it was election day ! Each Junior was 
eagerly discussing the subject of class officers with her neighbor, in 
soft and low accents, of course, when the door opened, and Dr. 
Clewell and Miss Lou Shaffner entered the room. They had been 
invited to preside over the meeting. 

Our Principal talked with us a short while, and then the ballot 
box was opened and the votes cast. 

How intently we listened as Miss Lou read the number of 
votes that each candidate received, and how the walls rang with 
the sound when we applauded the victor ! 

Dr. Clewell remarked that we Juniors were as eager over the 
decision as old politicians over some important political campaign. 
There were two ballots for President and Vice President. 
The following is the list of officers chosen : 
President — Miss Zeta Slack. 

Vice Presidents — Misses Brietz Thom and Nellie Buford. 
Secretary — Miss Lula Stipe. 
Treasurer — Miss Mary B. Gudger. 
Poet and Historian — Miss Agnes Belle Goldsby. 



22o8 The Academy. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 

This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 

EDITORIAL STAFF : 
Bessie B. Sloan, — Editor-in-chief. 
L. Pauline Sessoms— Assistant Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby— Literary Editor. 
Mary B. Gudger — Exchange Editor. 
Corinne Baskin — Business Manager. 

IBtiitortal. 



— The greatest reward for humblest effort is — appreciation. 
— The greatest incentive — encouragement. 



— Help your fellow beings with encouragement, a modicum of 
praise, and a soupcon of admiration. 

— Cultivate poise. Before you can influence others you must 
govern yourself. 

— A retentive memory is a great thing, but the ability to forget 
is the true token of greatness. 



— Strong people are not so much advertised by their loving 
friends as by their rabid enemies. 



— The first meeting of our Society this year was held September 
12. Twenty-three new members were initiated that evening, and 
since then four more have joined. We are glad to welcome them 
into our midst 



— Our exchange column will begin next month. 



The Academy. 2209 

The Importance of Being in Earnest. 



Too little attention is paid nowadays to earnestness. Its import- 
ance cannot be overestimated. What ever be the undertaking let 
the watchword be — earnestness 

In the daily school work consider no detail too insignificant for 
your best endeavor. We are apt to let the minor matters of life 
take care of themselves, and devote most time and earnest effort 
to the larger and greater problems. We should reverse the order, 
for to big things we give voluntary attention and to the little ones 
we scarce think it worth while to pay much heed. Once the 
thought is fixed in our minds that earnestness is next akin to genius 
there will be fewer failures in school life. 

Ambition can readily feed upon the success which earnestness 
begets, and there is no surer way to gain the goal of a desired 
degree than by recognizing the importance of it. When the school 
work is done the same prime factors that smoothed the way for 
learning make the new roadway easier. 

If one has chosen to be self-supporting, the benefits to be derived 
by this training process will be found invaluable. If, on the other 
hand, one's lines fall in pleasanter places, it is equally beneficial. 
For instance, to entertain is a talent, yet it requires a certain amount 
of earnestness to properly develop this faculty. People who are 
really entertaining are those who know how to make you enjoy 
yourself as well as their company, and this condition is brought 
about by earnest thought on the subject. 

The importance of being in earnest would be the sentence of ad- 
vice I should give each friend going forth to take a place in the 
affairs of the world. Earnestness is the modern synonym for success. 



Monday, October thirteenth, nineteen hundred and two, will 
always [be remembered by the Seniors of 1903, for on that day they 
received their Oxford caps and gowns. 

This year the caps and gowns were ordered from a new firm, and 
theyjarrived much sooner than usual. When they came the Seniors 
naturally were very excited and eager to open the boxes which con- 
tained them. They were unpacked as rapidly as possible and 
donned immediately. Each Senior felt her importance as she 
walked through Winston-Salem that afternoon, gowned in black, 
"staid Wisdom's hue." 



2210 The Academy. 

A Tally-Ho Ride in Scotland. 



BY AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY. 



One bright, sunny morning in August we started from a little 
village in Scotland to cross the Trossachs. 

The tally-ho was filled with a gay party of travellers gathered 
together from all parts of the globe. One of my neighbors had 
come from Australia a few months since, and she talked inces- 
santly of her island home. The gentleman to my left, a jolly, 
hearty, whole-souled old fellow, hailed from the " Vaterland," and 
between comments on the scenery, he discoursed on the superiority 
of Munich beer and German sausage, while in reply to his remarks 
the trim little gentleman by his side merely shrugged his shoulders 
and murmured, "Ah, oui?" The blue-eyed young lady perched 
on the seat behind the burly coachman had great difficulty in seeing 
the landscape, as such an immense barrier immediately in front of 
her rather obstructed her view, and whenever the unconscious 
driver would crack his whip this fair daughter of England would 
whisper to her companion : "Say, Ethel, is my hat on. straight ?" 

Soon we began the ascent of the mountains, and such mountains 
they were ! All covered with the purple and white heather in full 
bloom, which filled the pure air with sweet fragrance. Here and 
there from amongst the delicate fern and soft moss, huge boulders 
towered toward the cloudless sky. Little streams of water trickled 
down from the rocky ledges above, growing larger and broader as 
they flowed merrily down until they reached the fertile valley far, 
far beneath, where they roared and dashed over their pebbly beds, 
seeming to repeat as they tumbled along, "Men may come and 
men may go, but we go on forever." Now and then we saw a 
flock of sheep grazing on the mountain side, guarded by the shep- 
herd and his faithful dogs. Once we passed a Highland piper, 
picturesque in his short kilts and gay plaid, who was playing a 
lively fling as we dashed by, and secretly wishing in his heart of 
hearts that we would fling him a penny or two. 

As we descended the mountain we rode through several small 
villages, and the inhabitants stared at us open-mouthed as we went 
by, the dogs, big and little, greeted us with barks and yelps, and 
not unfrequently a line of tow-headed children, barefoot and almost 
breathless, would run after the coach, crying, "A penny ! a penny!" 



The Academy. 221 1 

And nine times out of ten their petitions were not uttered in vain, 
for we often left them scrambling in the dusty road for the great 
wealth (copper coins of the realm) which we had so recklessly 
thrown away. 

At noon we arrived at the hotel where luncheon awaited us, and 
I must say that one and all did full justice to the meal, for you have 
heard of the terrible effect the mountain air has on the appetite 
and when you consider the added influence of perfumed heather 
and the joyous notes of a Scotch bagpipe played by a " truly true" 
Highlander, I am sure you will not wonder at the rapid disappear- 
ance of the porridge which the bonnie lasses set before us. 

After our repast, in answer to the bugle call, we all rushed out 
to secure our places on the same tally-ho in which we had come, 
for our baggage was stowed away under the seats, and as you well 
know no traveller likes to have his luggage several miles away 
from him. 

Finally all was ready, and at the sound of the horn we again 
started on our journey. The jolts over the road seemed to have a 
soothing effect on our hale German friend, for he soon forgot his 
Munich beer and favorite sausage, and drawing his overcoat about 
him settled down for an afternoon's nap. The Frenchman, whom 
we simply designated as "Monsieur," produced a pair of opera 
glasses from some where among his great pile of wraps, and sur- 
veyed in silence the surrounding country. The English maiden 
was just full of fun and kept the rest of the party in shrieks of 
laughter at her jokes and witty remarks. 

About four o'clock we reached the borders of Loch Katrine, and 
here the party separated, some remaining at the hotel while others 
boarded the steamer which went up the lake. 

How beautful the water looked in the sunshine ! Its blue ripples 
touched with gold shimmered and glistened beneath the azure 
heavens. The noble mountains rose protectingly on each side, 
and peace reigned over all. 

We passed Ellen's Isle, a lovely spot far out in the water, where 
it is said the Lady of the Lake spent many of her days. 

We arrived in Edinburgh at dusk, and there we bade our com- 
panions farewell and sought our downy pillows, very tired but 
delighted with our day's journey. 



2212 The Academy. 

An Episode or an Event ? 



Winifred Sears was breakfasting alone in one of the luxurious 
dining cars of a northbound train. She had left her Southern 
home the night before, and was now speeding to the great city of 
Washington, where she was to be maid of honor for Edith Howell, 
the friend of her school-days. Winifred's thoughts about the 
coming wedding were far too absorbing for her to notice the tall 
young man who had seated himself at the farther end of the car. 
Robert Grey's thoughts were not so far distant, and for several 
minules his eyes had lingered on the young girl just in front. He 
suddenly felt himself possessed of a great longing to see the face of 
the maiden whose very presence seemed to bewitch his thoughts. 

The rumbling of the train had ceased. A glance through the 
window showed a small depot and the main street of a country 
town. Presently the conductor came in to tell of a washout which 
would probably cause several hours delay. Turning to make some 
inquiry, Winifred's eyes met the gaze of Robert Grey. In an 
instant her lids drooped, but not before she was dimly conscious of 
his intent gaze and handsome face. 



On the little platform of the village depot stood this same Wini- 
fred, wide-eyed with dismay, but nobly striving to keep back the 
tears. The train was gone, the office closed, and no one seemed 
ready to help her in her distress. A man, standing at some little 
distance, noticed the girlish figure, who seemed to be looking for 
some one of whom she could make inquiries. A second glance 
and Robert Grey recognized his neighbor of the breakfast-table. 
Grasping the situation immediately and feeling a thrill of delight at 
the thought of being able to assist her, he advanced, with hat in 
hand, saying : 

" I see that you, too, have been left ; but this is no fit place for 
you. Come let me take you away." 

The girl caught the earnestness of his tones, and her soft brown 
eyes looked appealingly into his. 

" Why did the train go so soon ? I know it was foolish for me 
to get off, but the conductor said it would be two hours be'ore he 
could go on, and I was back in less than an hour." 

"Oh yes, we were both here in time, but it seems the washout 



The Academy. 2213 

was repaired sooner than was expected, so the train was only de- 
layed half an hour." 

" But what is to be done ! I cannot stay in this place ! What 
will Edith think if I am not there in time for her wedding? Oh, I 
must reach Washington in some way," cried poor Winifred. 

" I am told that a special is to pass through during the after 
noon. If it can be stopped you will reach the city in a few hours." 

" Oh, how glad I am for this. Then I will get there just in time. 
But poor Edith will be almost frantic when she hears I didn't arrive 
at the expected hour." 

Again Grey was made happy by the smile which broke through 
the shadows of the girl's face, when he suggested that a telegram 
be sent to assure the anxious Edith that another train would carry 
her there in time for the wedding. Relieved of all fears Winifred 
was once more the pretty and bewitching girl of the dining-car. 
Although she was troubled by the thought that soon this man who 
had come so gallantly to her aid at this time would be only a 
memory, she determined to enjoy in full the present occasion. 
Robert Grey who, from the first, had been charmed, could now 
have poured out his heart's love at the girl's feet, was staking his 
hope of happiness on a slight clue he had gained from the telegram 
sent to Edith Howell, Washington, D. C. Could this adorable 
creature be the "Win." of whom Edith spoke so often. He had 
to be content to wait and see 

t + + 

+ + 4- 

About dusk a special train came whizzing and puffing into the 
great Washington depot Winifred's smile was bright as she 
thanked Robert Grey for his attentive kindness of the day, but an 
expression of regret passed over her face when the good-bye was 
said. 

The Howell carriage had soon brought her to Edith's home. 
Reproaches — explanations — and the maid of honor was hurried 
away to don her beautiful gown for the ceremony 

The magnificent church, heavily perfumed with roses, the strains 
of Lohengrin pealing forth from the sacred organ, seemed one 
glorious dream. Winifred's hand rested daintily on the arm of the 
best man as the splendid procession slowly wended its way down 
the aisle, keeping step to Mendelssohn's grand march. A thrill of 
joy surged through Winifred's heart as in one swift glance she 
recognized the hero ol her dreams. 

A moment later the awakening came when Robert Grey whis- 
pered into her ear, " Dearest, in the next wedding let us get there 
in time and head the procession." 



2214 The Academy. 



THE HESPERIAN 



An Analysis of the Game of Golf. 



"Write me an article on Golf," such is the command I have re- 
ceived. It sounds very easy, does it not ? But it is not I could 
sit down and write Golf to a company of braw Highlanders by the 
column, but I wonder how many of my fair readers have ever 
played Golf, and, alas ! how many have not. I have heard it whis- 
pered, but perish the thought, that there are some people who have 
never even heard of it. And right there is the difficulty : how to 
make an article interesting to those who know all about the subject, 
and to those who do not. 

I have it on good authority that Adam played Golf. I cannot 
personally vouch for the truth of the statement, because I was not 
present on the occasion, but rumour has it that our great ancestor 
was wandering along one day in a disconsolate sort of a way, wish- 
ing that he had some one with whom he could discuss politics or 
other burning questions of the day, when hehappened to pick up a 
fallen branch of a tree with a peculiar hook at the end of it. He 
was whirling it around without any particular object in view when 
he spied a stone about the size and shape of an egg and, with that 
natural impulse which has descended to the Adams of the present 
day he conceived the idea of striking at it with his hooked stick. 
No sooner thought of than done ! He carefully addressed himself 
to the ball (I mean stone, of course. I must, however, state here, 
for the benefit of the uninitiated, that "addressing the ball" is a 
correct golfing term, and refers to that part of the game where the 
player strikes a more or less graceful attitude before the object of 
his attentions, and after a few moments spent in wiggling his club 
above and around it, he makes a mighty blow at it, and if he hits 
it he has the delight of seeing the ball sail away so far that he is 
liable to spend the rest of the day looking lor it.) Well, Adam 
went through all this performance in correct style, and sure enough 
hit his stone (rue and lull, and away it sailed over an adjacent hill. 



The Academy. 2215 

He was, of course, delighted ; following it up and finding it after 
a while he' hit it again, with a like result, and immediately became 
imbued with the spirit of Golf. He began to figure how many 
strokes it would take to cover a given distance, and then he made 
a little hole for the ball to drop in when he had reached his goal. 
The first golf course was thus laid out It did not take him long 
to make more holes, and after slyly practicing for a few days until 
he had become fairly proficient, he invited Eve to come and have 
a game with him, which she did. Whereupon Adam demonstrated 
to her, to his entire satisfaction, the immense superiority of man 
over woman in all games of skill. 

And so the game has gone on through many generations, with 
many changes of name and deviations of methods until the present 
day, with its well kept links, its highly finished and perfectly bal- 
anced golf-sticks, and its beautifully-made, far-travelling balls. 

To the uninitiated, Golf appears to be a very stupid and uninter- 
esting game, but those who understand it realize in how far they 
are mistaken. They always remember their first game, however. 
How they went out to the teeing ground, had their ball placed on 
an inviting looking "tee" and, oh ! how easy it seemed to hit it 
like the others were doing. Then they tried it themselves, but the 
ball remained on the "tee," seeming to smile upon them, and they 
discovered that they had knocked out quite a considerable portion 
of Mother Earth. They also found that the dainty club which 
their friend had lent them had, to their horror, been broken up 
into several sections. After making their apologies, the kind 
friend presents another club for use and the beginner tries and tries 
again, until finally he succeeds in hitting the ball. It is true that it 
has travelled in the opposite direction to that in which you intended 
it to go, but what of that ! It is at least off of that terrible " tee " 
He goes perseveringly on, presently he, accidentally, or otherwise, 
hits it as he ought to do, and he sees it soaring through the air 
toward the home flag, amid the congratulations of his partner ; (in 
spite of the fact that he has broken a couple more of his clubs in 
the course of the game) He feels then that he has become a 
golfer, gets the "golf fever," and nothing thereafter can keep him 
off the golf green. E. t. 



2216 The Academy. 

Daily Newspapers — Merits and Defects. 

The daily newspaper of the present time is a very excellent inven- 
tion. The first newspaper of which we have any record was pub- 
lished in France a few centuries ago, and time has perfected what 
was then begun, so that our daily publications are marvels of good 
management. A netvspaper is what its name implies, — a paper of 
news. It is printed once and sojnetimes twice a day ; the number 
of pages it contains ranges from 4 to 30 sheets. The average town 
newspaper consists of six pages ; the ordinary cit> publication of 
about sixteen. A newspaper gives a synopsis of the day's doings 
in a very broad sense. A large part of its space is devoted to ad- 
vertisements. Like everything else it has its good points and its 
bad ones. One of the newspaper's merits is that it keeps the read- 
ing public well informed regarding topics of the day ; through its 
advertisements it furnishes many persons with employment, and 
aids others in finding lost property. In a comprehensive way, 
therefore, it is one of the greatest public benefactors. 

The authorities of a newspaper in their eagerness to supply their 
patrons with the very latest information, often exaggerate the facts 
they receive, or jump at conclusions, so to speak. In this way a 
great deal of harm is done. 

There is a tendency observed for less of exaggeration and more 
of brevity and statement of fact, which condition is another evi- 
dence that while newspapeas have their defects as well as merits, 
the latter outweigh the former, and they are indispensable in the 
countries in which they are published. A. R. s., '03. 

— Henry Clews, perfectly bald, was travelling on a western rail- 
road. Sitting directly behind him was a coarse looking man, with 
a rough shock of hair, the color of brick dust. Tapping Mr. 
Clews on the shoulder, the fellow remarked: "Say! Guess you 
weren't around when they gave out the hair " " Oh, yes, I was," 
was the answer, " but I was a trifle late, and there was nothing left 
but that stuff you wear, so I told them I'd rather have none." 

— Dean Wright, of Yale, before whom offending students stand 
trial, tells the following story as containing the highest development 
of the evasive answer. The pointer of the sun dial that adorns the 
campus had been stolen as a trophy, and the Dean was questioning 
a student believed to have had a share in its removal. 

"Mr. ," said the Dean, "who stole the pointer from the 

sun-dial ?" 

"Procrastination is the thief of time, sir," was the immediate and 
non-committal reply. — N. Y. Times. 



The Academy 2217 

lExeijange Department. 



FLORENCE MOORMAN. 



— We enjoyed all of our exchanges last year, and we will be 
more than glad to send The Academy to the same magazines 
again this year. 

— We shall try to make this department as interesting as possi- 
ble by studying our exchanges thoroughly, by clipping well, mak- 
ing our criticisms just and complimenting where compliments are 
deserved. 

— We have had occasion to welcome only two exchanges so far 
this term, but we hope to see all of our old exchanges and many 
new ones coming in soon. 

SSoofts of tije Hag. 

ADAH A. PETWAY. 



"The Virginian," by Owen Wister. 

" Dorothy Vernon,' by Charles Major. 

"Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch," by Alice Hegan. 

" It's Up to You," by Hugh McHugh. 

"Castle Craneycrow," by McCutcheon. 

"Ranson's Folly," by William Sternes Davis. 

— "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch" has become extremely 
popular, owing to its wholesome philosophy. 

The family consisted of Jimmy, the breadwinner, a boy of fifteen, 
who died ; Billy, who later took his place ; three little girls, Asia, 
Australia and Europena. 

The "Christmas Lady," Miss Lucy Olcott and Robert Redding 
form the romantic part of the book. 

— "Castle Craneycrow," Charles McCutcheon's latest book, is 
intensely interesting from cover to cover. 



Cabin boy — " Captain, is a thing lost when you know where it is?" 
" Of course not, you idiotic boy," the captain replied. 
" Well, then, sir, your silver teapot is at the bottom of the sea." 
Exit cabin boy. 



2218 The Academy. 

lEtrttorial department. 



Editor-in-chief — Amy R. Sloan. 
Assistant Editor — Katie M. Kilbuck. 
Literary Editor — Adah A. Petway. 
Exchange Editor — Florence Moorman. 
Business Manager — Sadie M. Rollins. 



" Provide an acceptable tenement for soul and mind, and all will 
be well," was the advice given by a disciple of ^sculapius when 
asked for some parting word. This brief sentence begot discussion, 
which impressed one more than ever with the importance of being 
physically fit. In short, it means that the body wholesome must 
first exist before the mental endowments can reach a state of per- 
fection. With this thought in mind I would advocate outdoor 
sports, and would ask the co-operation of my fellow seniors in my 
effort to inaugurate a class of would-be athletes. We all know and 
appreciate how much depends upon the "outward expression of in- 
ward grace;" a pleasing and healthful body usually clothes a 
goodly mind. Air and exercise are the best tonics a school girl 
cnn take ; let us all determine to take a daily dose and create that 
"desirable tenement" which is so strong a factor in the successes 
of to day. 

" Nothing Little to the Truly Great." 



The truly great believe in doing " whatever the hand findeth to 
do, and doing it with all their might :" that whatever is worth doing 
at all is worth doing well, and they absolutely shrink from shirking 
even their smallest duty. As Dickens says: "They are simply 
and staunchly true to their duty, alike in the large case and in the 
small." 

Faithful in little things means that affairs of weight and mo- 
ment may be intrusted to you. 

Now that September and October have passed, and the machin- 
ery of this large institution of ours has been once more set in to 
working, let us each see that we begin our day rightly, continuing 
in that effort until evening, trying in our small way to contribute 
to the success of each day and so the week, the teim, if possible, 
remembering that nothing is little to the truly great in spirit. 



The Academy. 2219 

ILocate. 



— We are glad to see the love of outdoor games abroad in the 
school, and hope that clubs will soon be formed. 

— It gives us great pleasure to see that Mrs. Clewell is able to be 
with us again, after a few days of illness. 

— Some weeks ago the members of the Freshman Class organized 
and elected the following officers : 

President — Carrie Levy. 

Vice President — Eleanor Fries. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Dorcas Lott. 

Critic — Ruth Siewers. 

With the above girls' as their leaders we have reason to expect 
great things of the Class of 1906. 

— In the course of the month Mrs. Frances P. Willard made a 
short but pleasant visit, coming to see her daughter, Adah Petway. 

— Mrs. Rondthaler, Mrs Chase and little Eleanor Chase arrived 
Thursday, October 9th, and found hearty welcomes from friends and 
acquaintances. 

SHE FRECKLED. 

She smiled at him archly, all dimpled and wise, 

And said, with the wit of her sex : 
'' The sun hasn't ever affected my eyes, 

Yet in summer I have to wear specs." 

A MISERABLE FAILURE. 

"How about the historical novel?" asked the publisher. "No 
good at all," answered the reader to whom it had been assigned. 
" The man doesn't understand how to write historical novels, and he 
hasn't perverted the truth as we know it enough to make any kind of 
a rumpus among the critics. His book would fall flat." 

bobby's choice. 
Bobby's father — "It's going to rain cats and dogs," 
Bobby — "Oh, papa, may I keep a little bull dog if one' of that 
kind falls." 



2220 The Academy. 

Relations Between Faculty and Students. 



The Delineator, the popular and well known Ladies' Magazine,. 
Butterick Publishing Company, New York, has the following to say- 
under "College News," in the September number, 1902, of interest 
to Salem's friends : 

"The advantages of a college education are not confined to study 
and books; the influences and surroundings of, and the daily contact 
with, strong and varied individuals offer opportunities sometimes as 
valuable in their way as knowledge and erudition. Apart from the 
close associations of lecture and class room, the professor and pupil 
form relations affording pleasure and profit to both, and continuing 
through the years to come after the college course is ended. Social 
amenities are exchanged on both sides, and many little acts of kind- 
ness and courtesy. To the college president and other executive offi- 
cers fall an extra share of oversight and an added amount of enter- 
taining." 

The article then goes on to speak of social customs at Vassar, at 
Mt. Holyoke, and at Wellesley. It describes customs and peculiar- 
ities at Bryn Mawr, at Cornell and at Smith, and then continues as 
follows : 

"The personal note is sounded most deeply, perhaps, in the inter- 
est and care bestowed. in the time of illness or worry. This is exem- 
plified at Salem College, Salem, North Carolina, where special teach- 
ers have oversight of groups of girls. These they "mother" in a whole- 
hearted way. A girl enters her freshman year a perfect stranger; 
five minutes later, that girl, mentally, at least, has been adopted by 
her special instructor. If homesick she is petted or reasoned with, 
as seems best, and a word to the "old girls" brings them to her assist- 
ance in making the newcomer feel thoroughly at home. If weak in 
some study the teacher is ready to spend hours helping her to catch 
up with her class; if she has a headache, she will be tucked up on a 
couch, or taken to the infirmary and carefully nursed. If she gets 
into a difficulty her guardian will help her out — that is, if she ac- 
knowledges her fault; if lazy, she will be gently spurred on ; if too 
ambitious, properly checked ; if delicate, watched over and usually 
sent home at the close of the term a large per cent, better than on 
entering. Such a life requires a peculiar type of strong Christian 
womanhood, and it is no wonder the teachers leave an indelible im- 
press on the young minds." 



— Among the many new arrivals are two from Florida. They live 
in the fountain, but love beef steak like any other boarder in the 
school. These two alligators seem to be quite at home, but the past 
cool days remind them that it is about time to enter into their winter 
sleep. 



The Academy. 2221 

— Information has been received from Dresden, in Saxony, that 
the picture which is being painted as the memorial of the Class of 
1901, is progressing nicely, although the very great number of dark 
and wet days have caused the delay of its completion. Arrangements 
have been made to have the picture, "Christ in the Temple," brought 
into this country free of duty. 

— An unusual interest has arisen in outdoor sports. The tennis 
court just east of Main Hall is in constant requisition, while the rum- 
ble of the balls in the ten pin alley may be heard at all times when 
the pupils are free from class or room duty. This is as it should be. 

jIBarrtoi. 



Piatt — Sheppard. — On Oct, 3, 1902, Mr. W. Piatt to Miss Marion 
Sheppard, of Winston, N. C. 

Peek — Harper. — On Oct. 28, 1902, at Jones Hotel, Winston, Mr. Wil- 
liam A. Peek, of Thompson Falls, Montana, to Miss Jennie Harper, of 
Lewisville, N. C, 

Briney — Neal.— At Eutaw, Ala., Oct. 16, 1902, Mr. Russell Barkley 
Briney to Mrs. Nannie Barnes Neal. At home after Nov. 1st, Jackson, 
Mississippi. \ 

Norfleet — Dooley. — On Oct. 22, 1902, in Gunton Temple Presbyterian 
Church, Washington. N. C, Mr. George S. Norfleet to Miss Hazeline 
Dooley. At home after Nov. i, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Plumley - Gray. — On Oct. 23, 1902, at Centenary Methodist Church, 
Winston-Salem, N. C, Mr. Charles Edwin Plumley, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
to Miss Bess Lindsay Gray. 

Brown— Holland.— On Oct. 27, 1902, at Apex, N. C, Rev. J. D. Brown, 
of Charlotte, N, C, to Miss Pauline Alberta Holland. 

Whittington — Kerner. — On Oct. 20, 1902 Mr. Ernest Whittington, 
of Nashville, Tenn., to Miss India Kerner, of Kernersville, N. C. 

Jennings— Reynolds — On Nov. 4, 1902, in Aberdeen, Miss., Mr. Hugh 
Jackson Jennings to Miss Lallie Reynolds. 

Shaffner — Richardson. — On Nov 5, 1902, in the Baptist church of 
Hopkinsville, Ky., Mr. William F. Shaffner, of Fries, Va., to Miss Jen- 
nie T. Richardson. 



JBieti. 



Hartsell— On Oct 11, 1902, Miss Daisy Hartsell, of Concord, N. C 
after a long illness of consumption. 



2222 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, ** Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston- *'alem. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department, you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2223 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say: 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about your people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says : " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 

By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
Printed by Doubieday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE : 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLEE & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 



2224 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL 



We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goads of Every Description. 

A complete line of 

-:-__NOTIONS,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-SALEM, IV. C 



The Academy. 2225 

HEW FALL AMD WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought t'» the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair ot them. 

EOSENBACHEES 
DEPARTMENT STOEES. 



2226 The Academy. 

Oak Riclge Institute, 

OAK RIDGE, N. C. 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSohool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H HOLT, Priiis 



When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLET would 
it not be a good plan to place vour son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and bealtbful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARTH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding' School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins fanuary 10th, /Sgj. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham SchooH902-03 

Located on the Aslnrille Plateau sine t 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officrr de- 
tailed. Twenty States repiesented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Tex is and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Binghvm, Supt., Post Office, Asheville, N. C 



The Academy. 2227 

DYH7V.1TC 



WINSTON-SACEM. N. C. 

PLUMBEE, 

TINNEE, 
COENIOE WOEKEE. 



SOUTBGRI^RAILUJAY. 

The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars 
on all Night Trains; Fast and Safe Schedules. ^23 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, F. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N.C C.P.&T.A.,Ashevli]e,N.C 

FRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP. S. H HARDWICK. 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D C. 



2228 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighti 3g, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduate from Classical Course enter State University without examination. 
Situations easily secuied by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogua. 

J AS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 

YOU 

WANT 



SHOE 

THAT'S 

ALL 



IF 
SO 

SEE 

us 



GO? 



i©#Iy & feat©* 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOZtsTES. 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best iha< the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference Salem Female Academy 



The Academy. 2229 



THE AC ADEMY. 

Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C, November, 1902 No. 224. 

Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College ; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



lEtritottal. 



— On the occasion of a recent visit to President Thomas, of 
Bryn Mawr, arrangements were made for an examination of pupils 
desiring to enter that College, the examination to be held in Salem 
in May next. Those who desire to come from other points can 
find accommodations within the School, and upon application we 
will furnish detailed information. Bryn Mawr has been holding 
examinations at four places, in the past, but none so. far south as 
North Carolina. The date is May 29th, 1903. 



— A well arranged Preparatory Department will be a valuable 
addition to our other departments. The work of preparing pupils 
for an advanced School like Bryn Mawr or Wellesley is different 
from the work done in our regular course. In our regular course of 
study the special needs of the scholar in real life are considered, 
and the work planned accordingly. In the case of the preparatory 
course of study the entrance examination requirements only are 
considered. Hence the establishment of a Preparatory Department 
in Salem would be as distinct a department, as is the case with the 
music or art departments. 



2230 The Academy. 

— Correspondence has been entered upon with several parties 
who are connected with the organized entrance examinations for 
the colleges of the New England and Middle States, with a view to 
having a center for such examinations at Salem. Persons can take 
these examinations without necessarily entering a Northern College, 
though when one is taken successfully, admission is thereby gained 
to any of the affiliated schools. 



— The visit of Rev. and Mrs. Kreider to Salem was a very 
pleasant occasion. They are in charge of Linden Hall, Lititz, Pa., 
the second oldest school for the higher education of young women in 
the United States, it having been founded in 1794. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kreider have been very successful in their work at Linden Hall, at 
which we rejoice. In addition to the pleasure of greeting these 
friends as official representatives of our sister school in Pennsylvania, 
we found them to be very charming people while they were the 
guests of the Academy. 

— The Synod of the Moravian Church in the South which was 
held in November in Salem, was a remarkably successful and 
enjoyable occasion. The plans for aggressive work in the future 
were" very encouraging, and the visit to the Academy was happily 
planned and pleasantly carried out. We give in another place the 
report of the Committee on Education, in so far as it relates to our 
School. 



— The steady growth of the spirit of self-government among 
the pupils cannot be too greatly commended. The classes are all 
fully organized, and the officers are always ready to confer with 
Principal or teachers in regard to the welfare of the pupils. One 
of the pleasing features is the determined stand taken in the matter 
of requiring fair and honest work on the part of each and every one. 



— Connected with the idea of self government, as it is growing 
and developing, was the meeting of the entire number of boarding 
pupils some days ago, to discuss the question of the present custom 
of Christmas gifts among the pupils. Gradually the natural and 
happy giving of Christmas presents had grown into a habit which 



The Academy. 2231 

was burdensome in its extent. By an almost unanimous vote it was 
decided to abolish the undesirable features, and retain only that 
portion of the custom which should be retained. 



— Recitations will close a little earlier than usual this year, and 
announcement has been made that no excuses from class will be 
given before the close, which is Friday, December 19th. Recita- 
tions will be resumed January 2nd, 1903, as usual, but grading in 
studies will not begin till Monday morning following. Parents are 
requested to co-operate with the School in declining to grant per- 
mission to their daughters to leave before Friday, December 19th, 
at 2 o'clock P. M. 



— The special system of examinations which has recently been 
instituted is proving itself to be a success. The successful pupil is 
stimulated to greater exertion ; the careless pupil is able to intro- 
duce more thoroughness into her efforts, while the unsuccessful 
worker now recognizes the condition of things, and has enough 
time left to redeem the situation before the final Spring tests. A 
number of these examinations were held in November, and others 
will take place during the week beginning December 15th. 



— The fuel problem has carried with it much anxious thought. 
How to adapt soft coal to hard coal furnaces was a problem. By 
thought and study the difficulties have in a measure been overcome, 
and the comfort of all is thus assured. The only remaining diffi- 
culty is the heavy expense which follows the present state of affairs. 
There is little doubt but that the consumer must in the end pay the 
bill arising from the coal strike. 



— Thanksgiving Day was a very happy occasion in the school. 
The Moravian church was tastefully decorated, and the pupils at- 
tended in a body. The thanksgiving dinner was as successful as 
usual, with its turkey and mince pie, its celery and cranberry sauce. 
Various forms of amusement were devised by the pupils for the 
remainder of the day. 



2232 The Academy. 

An Appropriate Christmas Present. 



The time of the year has arrived when the minds of many are 
turned in the direction of the happy Christmas season, and among 
other questions which arise is this : " What present shall I select for 
this or that friend." We suggest that you take into consideration 
the purchase of a " History ot Wachovia in North Carolina" as a 
suitable gift to any one who is at present interested in the institu- 
tion, or has been interested in the past, or who desires to obtain 
information in regard to the interesting history of the Moravian 
settlement in North Carolina, during the past 150 years. This book 
will be mailed to any address to which you may desire to have it 
sent, and if in your order you will enclose your card, we will see 
that this is placed in the book before it is mailed. (See advertise- 
ment on another page of The Academy.) 

The following letter by Miss Lehman, the head of our Depart- 
ment of Literature, will explain itself. This letter has been sent to 
the patrons of the School living at a distance from Salem, and we 
take this means of presenting it also to the former pupils who are 
readers of The Academy. 

A LETTER FROM MISS LEHMAN. 

"The "History of Wachovia" is a work of special interest 
and value to the patrons of Salem Academy and College as well as 
to the large number of pupils all over the country. 

"It is of particular value to our patrons in bringing them into 
closer touch with the school home of their daughters, the place 
where they spend the most important formative years of life, under 
influences of incalculable value. By reading this book patrons will 
learn to know the place, its people, and the working out of those 
great principles which have made it the power, the educational cen- 
ter which it has come to be, as they could not learn them in any 
other way. 

"They find who the Moravians are, how they established a 
God-fearing community in a savage wilderness, and made it blossom 
like the rose. The thoughtful reader cannot fail to note how these 
influences go on broadening and deepening" with the passing years, 
as they pursue the brief records of the representarive men in each 
age, see their strong pictured faces, and the mark they left in 
their day. 



The Academy. 2233, 

" Our Alumnae will find the book a souvenir to be treasured 
for here they have a succinct account of the Academy, collaborated 
with a fidelity and strict adherence to historic fact that is not com- 
mon in our time. They look upon the pictured walks, the scenes 
in which they loved to ramble in bygone days with a beloved com- 
panion, and Memory — the oldest of old Masters, brings back many 
a tender recollection, in colors of living beau^v, which makes the 
book a treasure to any one who has known and loved the Academy, 

• ' It will be a souvenir, a most acceptable and fitting Christmas 
present to any mother, wife, sister or daughter to whom the Acad- 
emy is dear. 

"To the lover of impartial history, of good literature, it has a 
value all its own, and deserves a place in every Library. 

E A. Lehman, 
' ' Head of Department of Literature. ' ' 



A Word From Asheville. 



During the sessions of the Presbyterian Synod held in Winston, 
a reception was tendered that body by our School, and we quote 
the following from the Asheviile Gazette : 

" B. R. Fakes, on returning from the Synod of North Caro- 
lina that met last week at Winston, tells how well the Synod was 
entertained and of the two receptions given that body. On the 23d 
a Musical, complimentary to them was given by the Salem Acade- 
my and College. He was pleased to meet with several of our Ashe- 
ville young ladies, with most of them a hearty shake of the hand 
with glad expressions from them of seeing a person from Asheville. 
These were Misses Lita Young, Bonnie Geen Johnston, Julia and 
Florence Barnard, Mary and Emma Guciger, Sadie Rollins, Nancy 
Merrimon, Matiella Cocke, Marguerite Hines and Mary Frost. He 
also saw Master Tim Cocke. All looked happy and surely all are,, 
with the home-like surroundings that this Institution gives. 

" The musical program consisted of Anthems, Piano SjIos and 
Reading by Miss Ackerman, " A Leap Year Wooing. " This recital 
brought down the house. The entire program was very entertain- 
ing. Then the young ladies of the College took charge of the 
members of the Synod and pointed out the rooms of the Institution 
from the culinary department to the study parlors. Thence to the 
rooms of the Historical Society where there were many relics more 



2234 The Academy. 

than a century old. Among the hundreds of these relics an old 
Piano that was played upon, on the occasion of a visit to Salem by 
George Washington, stands in a corner of one of the rooms and 
attracted especial interest for there is still " music in its soul." 

"The old church has passed its one hundredth year "mile 
post" and looks as though it might be good for several hundred 
more. There is an avenue walk of cedar trees that were planted in 
1767. Dr. Fakes expressed thanks for himself and two other elders, 
especially to Miss Lita Young's interest, that we should have a look 
at everything of interest. * * * * * 

"Bishop Rondthaler serves the 1,500 communicants, assisted 
by three other pastors. The Bishop received the Synod with one 
of his happy welcome talks that made all feel "The Unity of 
Brethren." The Moravian Church has an old date going back to 
1415, to the Bohemian reformer, John Huss, who was burned at the 
stake, and so the Martyr Huss has been the seed of a church that 
has been "sown beside all waters," and thus the Moravian Church 
has sprung up in many lands." 



The Moravian Synod. 



The Moravian Synod assembled in the Home Moravian church 
in November. This Synod meets each third year, and has in charge 
the legislation for the Southern Province of the Moravian Church. 
The meeting lasted three days, and was made up of about 60 repre- 
sentatives. In addition to the regular delegates, a number of vis- 
iting ministers were present. We noted as visitors Bishop Cheshire, 
of the Episcopal Church ; Dr. Brown, of the Baptist Church ; Rev. 
Mr. Kreider, of the Northern Moravian Province, and Bishop 
Berkenhagen, of the Moravian Mission in Central America and a 
number of others. 

The reports from the various fields of work were favorable, and 
especially so were those of the Schools of the Province. The 
Clemmons School is a new work which is making remarkable prog- 
ress. The Salem Boys' School is also gaining great strength and 
increased power. We quote from the report of the Committee on 
Education which relates to Salem Academy and College : 

"1. The report from this venerable and yet vigorous and thriv- 
ing institution is very gratifying. We congratulate the Synod, the 



The Academy. 2235 

efficient Principal and his wife, the teachers and the Board upon the 
good work done and upon the happy results achieved.. 

2. It seems proper that this Committee should particularly 
recognize and report to the Synod the valuable and helpful work 
done by the Centennial Committee for the School and also what has 
been done by other Committees. 

3. It gives us pleasure to note the improvements made in the 
buildings, the additional conveniences supplied, the care with which 
the course of study has been arranged, the intimate connections and 
associations made with Bryn Mawr and other great institutions of 
learning, and in short, everything that has been accomplished for 
the betterment and development of this great work. 

4. We feel that the Synod will heartily approve the excellent 
work done by the Principal and his wife in visiting during the sum- 
mer the different sections of the country from which patronage is 
drawn. We believe that this work is an important one and that 
good results will come from it. 

5. The religious spirit and training of this and all our other 
schools we regard as vital, and we desire the Synod to go on record 
with a strong expression of the necessity and importance of this 
work which has ever characterized our institutions of learning and 
which, we believe, must so characterize them through all the com- 
ing days. 

6. The matter of a strong, ample and permanent endowment 
fund is one in which we think the Synod deeply interested. The 
school of the future must be far in advance of that of the past. It 
should increase in numbers and influence, and meet all the proper 
demands of modern education. Other institutions have large funds 
or are supported by State aid, and are enabled to give advantages 
of every kind. This institution in the enlarged sphere of its use- 
fulness must not fall behind. It must become year by year a more 
important and potent factor. The scholastic and teaching force 
must be increased and improved each year without additional fees 
or cost to students. To this end the endowment fund is a necessity. 
The work has been well begun. We trust it may not lag. 

And now with thankful hearts to the great teacher who has so 
wonderfully presided over our educational institutions since the 
last Synod, and with expressions of appreciation for every helpful 
thing done by his servants, this report is most respectfully sub- 
mitted." 



2236 The Academy. 

On Tuesday afternoon a musical recital, under the direction of 
Prof. Shirley, was given to the delegates, and Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, 
assisted by a number of the teachers and pupils, then conducted 
the visitors through the various buildings of the Academy and over 
the grounds. This was about dusk, and with all the lights in the 
buildings and grounds making things bright and cheerful the recep 
tion was indeed an enjoyable occasion. The members of the school 
family vied with each other in their efforts to make the visit pleas- 
ant for the members of the Synod. 

On Wednesday evening Rev. Mr. Berkenhagen was consecrated 
a Bishop. The consecration services were in charge of Bishop 
Rondthaler, he having written consent and approval of a number 
of Bishops in the various parts of the Unity, who thus by letter 
officially entered into the Episcopal consecration. The occasion 
was one of very deep solemnity, and will never be forgotten by 
those who were present. 

Among the discussions in the Synod of general interest was that 
of the celebration of the Sesqui-centennial in November, 1903. It 
was Nov. 17th, 1753, that the settlement of this Province was begun, 
and the discussion had in view the proper preparations for this 
Sesqui-centennial celebration, which will, no doubt, be a remark- 
able event in the history of Wachovia. 

Another important discussion was the question of new and pro- 
gressive plansl'for the extension of the Church in sections of the 
South more distant from the central congregations in Wachovia. 
It is probable that the Church will soon enter upon a new and en- 
larged sphere of work which, during the next generation or two, 
will mark a new era in the development of the Church. 

The Synod very heartily endorsed the book, entitled, " History 
of Wachovia in North Carolina," by Dr. Clewell, and expressed 
the earnest desire that this! book should find its way into every 
home in the Province. 

Altogether the Synod was filled with life and activity, and, above 
all, with the warmest brotherly love. 



The Academy. 2237 

Among Our Patrons. 



BY DR. CLEWELL. 



In our letter to The Academy last month regarding- the visit 
north we touched only on the days spent in old Princeton. There 
was another side to the visit which we will speak of in this letter, 
and which refers to the time spent in the homes of our patrons and 
other friends. 

The first of the friends to greet us was Professor Skilton, whose 
guest we were while in Trenton. Prof. Skilton is still engaged in 
the State Normal College, and it was our pleasure not only to 
spend a most enjoyable social lime with him, but also to visit the 
College and address the students gathered in their large chapel. 

Passing onward on our journey we went to New York, where we 
thoroughly enjoyed the hospitality of Dr. and Mrs. Henry and Mr. 
and Mrs. Sharp. It is always a pleasure to be with these friends, 
and those who have once enjoyed a visit to these New York homes 
ever afterwards have a desire to repeat the pleasant experience. 

In Philadelphia we were the guest of Rev. E. S. Wolle, who has 
a host of friends in Salem He accompanied us to Bryn Mawr, 
and while at this great school we lunched with Miss Virginia Rags- 
dale, who is now studying for her Doctor's degree. The expe- 
riences at Bryn Mawr would call for a long letter if we attempted to 
describe them, hence this portion of the journey must wait for some 
future letter. 

The Bethlehem trip enabled us to greet Mr. and Mrs. Rice in 
Bethlehem, Rev. and Mrs. Bahnson in Schoeneck and Mrs. Reinke 
in Nazareth. The latter is the grandmother of the Misses Greider. 
We also had the pleasure of greeting Miss Grace Wolle and Miss 
Florence Settle, both former teachers in Salem. xMiss Flora Doak 
is now teaching in the Bethlehem Seminary, and we met her on the 
occasion of our visit to the Young Ladies Seminary, where we had 
the privilege of attending and taking part in their chapel service. 
In company with Clarence Clewell we visited Lehigh University, 
attending some of the lectures and inspecting their great buildings. 

We turned our steps homeward on Mondav, Nov. 3d, and in 
Baltimore, as the guest of Dr. A. A Clewell. spent some time gath- 
ering information regarding the marble fountain which the Class of 
1902 propose to put in Main Hall. We also visited the Woman's 



2238 The Academy. 

College in Baltimore, and began negotiations with a view to a 
closer affiliation with that institution. We also called on Emma 
Smith, who is at present studying in Baltimore. 

An early morning train brought us to Reidsville, where we were 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Harris. As our stay was very limited, 
Mrs. Harris kindly assisted us to rapidly call upon Mr. and Mrs. 
Walker, Mrs. Read, Mr Watlington, and we also paid our res- 
pects at the home of Mrs. Richardson and Mrs. Fillman. 

Thus it will be seen that although our trip was primarily intended 
to be a visit to Northern colleges, it also included the pleasure of a 
sojourn in the homes of the following present pupils : Misses Amy 
and Bessie Sloan, Flournoy Hopkins, Isabelle and Louise Rice, 
Anna Bahnson, Hattie, Emma and Mary Greider, Eva Harris, 
Mary Watlington, Henrietta Read and Mary Walker. 

To all the kind friends who ministered to us on the occasion of 
this journey we desire to return our hearty thanks. 



(Ktronicle antr (Hoggij). 



— A number of items for this and other departments of The 
Academy failed to find room, so that they will of necessity go 
over to the next issue. 

— The day scholars rejoice in their new "lockers." These 
models of convenience are located in South Hall, and are provided 
with space enough for books, lunch baskets, umbrella, hat, wrap, 
and even then there is room to spare. 

— Dec. 3d a bouquet of the finest roses was gathered in the 
Academy garden, as large, perfect, and as beautifully tinted as if 
they had bloomed in midsummer. 

— The new laboratory is now ready for use, and we hope to have 
an article regarding the plans of this flourishing department for a 
future number of The AcADEMYr 

— We were pleased to welcome quite a number of our patrons 
during the past weeks. Judge Merriman and Mr. Frost, of Ashe- 
ville, were here, also the Rev. Mr. Gold, of Wilson, as well as 
other friends who inspected the buildings, and at times took 
meals with us in the dining room. 



The Academy. 2239 

— We are very sorry to note the death at the Whitehead-Stokes 
Sanitarium on Oct. 21, of Mrs. Fannie Holt Scott, after many 
weeks of severe illness. She was married in 1892 to Mr. Henry 
W. Scott, and made a devoted wife and mother. Her husband 
and little son, Edwin, survive her. 

— On November 1st, the Cooking School of the Department of 
Domestic Science gave a very pretty exhibit of the successful work 
there done. The decorations of brilliant autumn leaves and im- 
mense chrysanthemums were in keeping with the bright faces and 
dainty toilets of the girls who served. The exquisite viands pre- 
sented to the appreciative visitors salads, cakes, desserts, candies 
in bewildering variety, were illustrations of cooking as a fine art, 
and well deserved the encomiums bestowed upon them. 

Later in the month, on the occasion of a visit from the Principal 
of Linden Hall, and his wife, Rev. and Mrs. Charles Kreider, the 
cooking school also gave a recherche luncheon to the visitors and 
a few invited guests. It was a symphony in green and white, with 
a delightful effect apart from the elegant repast, and the bright 
faces of the girls who, under Miss Query's direction, carried out 
all its varied details with perfect success. As a graceful close 
they presented the large basket of white carnations and the plumy 
asparagus, the centerpiece of the table, to Mr. and Mrs. Kreider as 
a memento of the occasion. The dainty souvenir cards placed 
at each plate were also the work of the young ladies of the Cook- 
ing School. 



Dodson — Lewis.— On Nov. 12, 1903, Mr. Glen Dodson to Miss Clara 
May Lewis, of Albany, Ga. 

Staley — Reynolds. — On Nov. 18, 1902, at Fairmount, Bristol, Tenn., 
Dr. Thomas F. Staley to Miss Sue Reynolds. 

Wilder — Desmond. — On Nov. 17, 1902, in Epiphany Church, Calvert, 
Texas, Dr. Eugene Wilder to Miss Josie Desmond. 

Holcomb— Robbins — On Dec. 3, 1902, Rev. Walter Benton Hol- 
comb to Miss Blanche Lamar Robbins, of Statesville, N. C. 



Hieii. 



Pegram.— On Nov. 17, 1902, Mrs. Thomas PEGRAM.Jr., (Helen Smith), 
of Greensboro, formerly of Winston. 

Scott— On Oct. 21, 1902, Mrs. Fannie Holt Scott, daughter of Mr. L. 
Banks Holt, and wife of Mr. Henry W. Scott. 



2240 



The Academy. 



Registered List of Faculty and Pupils of Salem Academy 
and College for 1902. 



faculty. Bury, Doris 

RevJ.H.Cle\ven,Ph.D.Bahnson, Louise 
Rt Rev. Edward Rond-Bahtison. Pauline 

thaler, D. D. Bailey, Mary A. 

Prof. H, A. Shirley, Bailey, Blanche 
" Tillinghast, Barber, Emorie 

Mr. C. B. Pfohl, Barber, May 

Mrs. Alice W. Clewell, Barr, Harriet 
Miss Emma Lehman, Baynes, Mattie 
" Louisa Shaffher, Benton, Mary 
" Emma Chitty, Blease, Menifer 
" Emma C. Bonny, Blum, Minnie 
" Sallie Shaffher, Blum, Mary K. 
" Margaret Bessent,Bohannon, Maud 
" Carrie Jones, Brendle, Stella 

" Elizabeth Heisler, Brewer, Hattie 
" Carrie Vest, Brietz, Ethel 

" Mamie Lewis, Brown, Eloise 
" Mabel Butner, Brower, May 
" Mary Meinung, Brower, Mary 
" Mary Greider, Brown, Anna E. 
" Carrie Speas, Brown, Lois 
'" Oteha Barrow, Brown Jenkie 
" Annie McKinney, Brown, Louisa C. 
" Luda Morrison, Brown, Gertrude 
" Sallie Vest, Brown, D.-lphine 

" Georgia Rights, Brown, Elien H. 
" Ethel Jeter, Buford, Nellie 

" Janie Lewis, Cardwell, Jennie 

" Amy Van Vleck, Cavaniss, Edith 
'• Adalyn AckermanCheatham, Birdie 
" Anna Siedenburg,Chisman, Pattie 
" - Z. LaPorte, Chisman, Pescud 

" Clara Query, Clark, Ada 

" Eug. Henderson, Clark, Nellie 
" LeonoraJohnston.Coan, Mrs. 
" Emma Stafford, Cobb, Mary 
" H. Peterson, Cocke, Tim 

Mrs. H . E. Rondthaler.Cocke, Mattiella 
Coleman, Leonora 



PUPILS. 

Aird. Emma 
Alspaugh, Stella 
Alspaugh, Frankie 
Adams, Mary 
Bahnson, Anastasia 
Barnard, Julia 
Barnard, Florence 
Baskin, Corinne 
Blount, Muse 
Borden, Rachel 
Bowden, Bessie 
Buck, Helen 
Bulluck, Maud 
Bury, Lucile 



Culpepper, Mary 
Carmichael. Maud 
Clark, Olive 
Clinard, Lollie 
Cook, Ada 
Cook, Sadie 
Crist, Bessie 
Crist, Louise 
Crist, Ruth 
Cromer, Mary 
Crosland, Mrs. E. S 
Cnmmings, Kemp 
DeShazo, Florence 
Dewey. Hannah 
Dorman, Lillie 



Drew, Ida May 
Dunlap, Agnes 
Dunlap, Ethel 
Dunlap, May 
Dalton, May 
Ebert, Nettie 
Erwin, Ellie 
Ebert, Emma 
Ellis, Lillian 
Flinn, Lelia 
Foy, Maud 
Frost, Mary 
Frost, Stella 
Farabee, Agnes 
Farish, Lily 
Faust, Emma 
Fawcett, Minnie 
Ferrell, Lora 
Fetter, Lizzie 
Follin, May 
Follin, Ruby 
Fiies, Eleanor 
Fries. Marguerite 
Fulton , Bessie 
Gaither, Mary 
Gold, Bessie 
Goldsby, Agnes Belle 
Greider, Ethel 
Greider, Emma 
Greider, Harriet 
Griffith, Kathleen 
Gudger, Mary 
Gudger, Emma 
Garner, Haydy 
Gray, Alice 
Groves, Nannie 
Groves, Ruby 
Gcunert, Louie 
Gaddy. Dora 
Hall, Irene 
Hall, Eunice 
Hall, Bertha 
Hamm, Bertha 
Hampton, Esther 
Harper, Louise 
Haynes, Nataline 
Haynes, Katie 
Hines, Margaret 
Holmes, Alice 
Hollings worth, Lettie 
Hoi lings worth, Rachel 
Hopkins, Flournoy 
Hughes, Bessie 
Hunter, Willie Ora 
Hancs, Claudia 



Hanes, Frank 
Hanes, Grace 
Hanes, Ruth 
Harris, Carrie 
Harris, Eva 
Hasten, Gloraine 
Hasten, Susie 
Hartman, Effie 
Hege, Connie 
Hege. Pearl 
Hopkins, Margaret 
Horton, Louise 
Hege, Rosa 
Jones, Cynthia 
Jones, Mary 
Johnson, Delia 
Jones, Ina 
Jones, Treva 
Kerner, Kathleen 
Kerner, Robah May 
Kerr, Maryne 
Kilbuck, Katie 
Kilbuck, Ruth 
King, Alma 
King, Blanche 
Knouse, Bessie 
Knox, Eliza 
LeGrand, Annie Sue 
Levy. Carrie 
Liles, Mary 
Lindley, Cammie 
Little, Sadie 
Little, Fanny 
Little, Rosa 
Little, Alice 
Little, Lila 
Louhoff, Elsie 
Liipfert, Theo. 
Lichtenthaeler, Annie 
Lockett. Edwina 
Long. Ida M. 
Lott, Dorcas 
Matthews, Ruth 
McCorkle, Ruby 
McDonald, Glenn 
McEachern, Lula 
McEachern, Mamie 
McMinn, May 
McMurray, Mary 
Merriman, Nancy 
Moorman, Florence 
Moorman, Corinne 
Morrison, May 
Martin, Sadie 
McNair, Minnie 



The Academy. 



2241 



Meinung, Ruth 
Mendenhall, Myrtle 
Mendenhall, Vivian 
Messer. Zilphia 
Mickle, Margaret 
Mickey. Annie 
Miller, Emma 
Miller, Trula 
Miller, Agnes 
Miller, Zeta 
Morgan, Lula 
Moran, Annie 
Montague, Helen 
1 Nicholson, Blanche 
Nichols, Ada 
Nicewonger, Ivy 
Nunn, Susie 
Ogburn, Annie 
Ogburn, Carrie 
Ormsby, Anna 
Ormsby, Elizabeth 
Ormsby, Emma 
Owens, Vivian 
Owens, Evelyn 
Petway, Ada 
Powers, Fannie 
Purdy, Edith 
Palmer, Mary 
Perryman, Mittie 
Peterson, Pauline 
Peterson, Grace 
Petty, Martha 
Petty. Rachel 
Petree, Mamie 
Pfaff, Erma 
Pfaff, Mamie 
Pfohl, Robah 
Pierce, Man- 



powers, Mary 
Powers, Percy 
Pridgen, Mary 
Prevatt, Dorothy 
Reavis, Bertha 
Reavis. Lucy 
Reid, Henrietta 
Rice, Louise 
Rice, Isabella 
Richardson, Mary 
Richard, Hattie 
Richard, Ida 
Reynolds, Marie 
Rollins, Sadie 
Roueche, Aline 
Russell, Bertie 
Reynolds, Maud 
Robertson, Nannie 
Rose, Alice 
Roth rock, Grace 
Saunders, Viola 
Sessoms, Lena 
Sessoms, Pauline 
Sherrod, Rusha 
Sherrod, Mary 
Shoaf, Myrtle 
Sloan, Amy 
Sloan, Bessie 
Slack, Zeta 
Smith, Emma 
Smith, K ithleen 
Stafford, Cleve 
Stewart, Mary 
Seddon, Joey 
Shipley, Stella 
Shore, Ida 
Sheetz, Sue 
Sizer, Anna 



Sides, Hattie 
Siewers, Grace 
Siewers, Ruth 
Sink, Mamie 
Smith, Almarine 
Smith, Helen 
Snider, H. 
Spaugh, Mabel 
Spencer, Lily 
Spillars, Lula 
Spillars, Mamie 
Spaugh, Eliza 
Stockton, Julia 
Stipe, Lizzie 
Stipe, Lula 
Stone, Mary 
Stewart, Stella 
Starbuck, Grace 
Stanton, Jessie 
Swink, Edna 
Sloan, Mrs. Jas. 
Tay, Kathleen 
Taylor, Kate 
Thorn, Brietz 
Tesh, Gertrude 
Thomas, Claude 
Thomas, Mabel 
Thomas, Rea 
Thomas, De Los 
Traxler, Blossom 
Traxler, Mabel 
Vickers. Birdie 
Vaughn, Lora 
Vaughn, Cassandra 
Vaughn. Eliza 
Vest, Lelia 
Vest, Annie 
Vogler, H. 



Wade, Lena 
Walker, Annie 
Warren. Bessie 
Ware, Clara 
Watlington, Mary 
Weslosky, Rtlta 
Wilson, Margery 
Willingham, Mildred 
Willingham, Ruth 
Williams, Laura 
Wilson, Etta 
Wilde, Jennie 
Wilde. Helen 
Wcoseley, Pearl 
Wood, Mary 
Watson, Metla 
Watson, Mamie 
Welfare, Hattie 
Webster, Kate 
Welfare, Drudie 
Webb, Addie 
White. Ethel 
Wilson, Julia 
Wilson, Annie 
Wilson, Edna 
Wiison, Elsie 
Wohlford, Bertha 
Wurreschke, Naomi 
Watkins, Bessie 
Young, Lita 



Total Registration, 
Faculty, 36 

Pupils, 325 



361 



— It is with great pleasure that we acknowledge the donation of 
a handsome volume to our college library, entitled "The Official 
History of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, Nashville, 1897," 
by the Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway Co. It is a 
large folio volume, handsomely bound, and exquisitely printed and 
illustrated in the highest style of art, and is an " Edition de Luxe" 
in every sense of the word. It was published under the direction 
of Dr. W. I. Dudley and S. H. Baskette of the Committee of Pub- 
lication, and edited by Herman Justice. It not only contains a 
fully illustrated history of the Exposition, but is a history of Ten- 
nessee and its noted men from early times to the present day, with 
portraits and sketches of such men as Gen. Sam Houston, the 
Washington of the Lone Star Republic, Commodore Maury, the 
pathfinder of the seas, and much else of interest that can be fittingly 
described in such a book. Our sincere thanks are due to the 
donor. 



2242 The Euterpean. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 
L. Pauline Sessoms— Editor-in-chief. 
Mary B. Gudger- Assistant Editor. 
Frances Powers— Exchange Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby— Literary Editor. 
Corinne Baskin— Business Manager. 



IHtittortaL 



— Not for many years has the country known such weather as 
we are having this fall. 

11 it were only in the South that grim Winter had not yet put in 
his appearance the fact of his absence would not be so commented 
upon, but the northern States as well are having a very mild season. 

On many of the Northern rivers, which are usually frozen over 
at this time, the boats are still passing up and down without any 
difficulty whatever. 

And it is seldom indeed that we have missed hearing the sleigh- 
bells long before the month of November is on the wane. A sleigh 
ride on Thanksgiving is usually one of the features of the day — 
this year it is quite evident we will forego that pleasure. 

We hardly know what to think when we see the trees budding 
anew and some of the fruit trees blossoming. Certainly this means 
a poor fruit crop next year. 

In a way, this lack of cold weather has been a blessing, — in fact, 
providential. The expensiveness of coal in the North and wood in 
the South would have caused the death of many poor people had 
we experienced the regulation fall and winter weather 

On the other hand it may mean a scarcity of fruit and even green 
leaves next Spring. Another evil which, no doubt, concerns the 
the furriers and shopkeepers to no little degree is the positive dearth 
in sales this season. Furs are no longer in demand, and the heav- 
ier winter goods are still on the shelves. 



The Euterpean. 2243 

The Alligator Cure. 

Every one knows the troublesome English sparrow. How often 
in the early morning have our slumbers been cut short by their 
incessant chattering noise. 

The ivy covering our dining hall and chapel seemed to be their 
favorite home in this neighborhood, while the fountain near by was 
their particular resort, being so convenient for their daily plunge 
baths in its refreshing waters. 

These noisy little creatures were a source of real complaint, but 
no one seemed able to devise a way by which we might rid our- 
selves of them. Relief came at last, but from such an unexpected 
quarter that their entire disappearance is scarcely credited. 

Last summer when the twin alligators were sent as pets from 
Florida, no one dreamed what a benefit they would prove in time. 
They were placed in this same fountain, the pool of the sparrows. 
The birds were in blissful ignorance of the newcomers, so continued 
with their innocent pastime of daily taking a dip in the cool water. 
Perhaps you know of the ugly habit the alligator has of keeping 
his food in his jaws for a day at a time, then eating it at his leisure - 
Tnis is just what happened to the birds. 

As a young sparrow would fly to the fountain for his morning ab- 
lutions he would suddenly find himself in the deadly clutches of his 
enemy. His pitiful cries alarmed the rest of the sparrow family ; 
they evidently held a conference, then suddenly disappeared. It 
seems that the strange death of their unfortunate companions was 
too much for them, so they migrated to some other locality, proba- 
bly much to the sorrow of the alligators, but greatly to our delight 
and peace of mind. 

Any friends who may be suffering from a pest of English spar- 
rows will find the alligator an unfailing remedy. 

— Several weeks ago when the two Societies combined with The 
Academy, Miss Elizabeth B. Sloan was elected editor-in-chief of 
The Euterpean department of the magazine. She successfully 
managed the first issue, but has recently resigned her office on ac- 
count of delicate health and press of school duties. Miss Pauline 
Sessoms, formally Assistant Editor, was appointed as Miss Sloan's 
successor. Miss Mary B. Gudger, the former Exchange Editor, 
was made her assistant, and Miss Frances Powers was given Miss 
Gudger's place. 



2244 The Euterpean. 

Only an Old Straw Hat. 



" Surely, you are not going to wear that,'" and Emily pointed in 
derison toward the enormous straw hat that hung on the wall. 

"Indeed, I am. It's the very thing for a picnic : in case of a 
shower I shall be well protected under my impromptu umbrella, 
and where could I find a better sun-shade?" 

" You certainly do not mind sacrificing beauty to the goddess of 
usefulness, — if such a deity exists, — and evidently you — " 

"Do hush, Em," interrupted Margery, " if you will allow me to 
express my humble opinion on the subject, I beg to differ with 
you," she said, with a sweeping bow, "it is, besides being useful, 
extremely picturesque," she added, as she took the object of her 
sister's scornful remarks from its peg on the wall. 

"Most becoming, my dear," retorted Emily, patronizingly. 

" I agree with you," Margery replied, displaying her dimples as 
she tied the great broad-brimmed hat under her chin. 

"There comes the wagon!" exclaimed Emily, fairly flying to 
the window as the rumble of wheels was heard outside. " Hurry, 
Marger)^, or you-' 11 be late." 

"I'm ready now. Wait for me, Em." 

And the two girls ran gaily down the stairs. 

>•< * $z % ^ 

"How do you do, Miss Margery? So glad to see you." 

It was Richard Benton who spoke, his handsome face beaming 
with genuine pleasure as he shook hands with the girl." 

" I am delighted that one person at least is not ashamed to speak 
to the 'Hat,'" said Margery, laughingly, "and in spite of Em's 
fearful prophecy that I should be left out in the cold on account of 
my atrocious head gear, as she calls it, I know that I shall have a 
splendid time." 

" I believe that is your usual way, Miss Margery. You seem to 
enjoy life immensely," the young man replied. 

"Indeed, I do," she answered heartily. "How did you ever 
recognize me under this huge, flapping thing ?" she asked abruptly. 

"Well, I must confess if was a difficult task to discover your 
blue eyes beneath that thatch of straw, but since I have found them, 
upon my word they are more bewitching than ever." 

Margery held up a warning finger. "Personal remarks posi- 
tively forbidden," she said, laconically. 



The Euterpean. 2245 

" Suppose then we speak of the weather as the more interesting 
topics of conversation have been forbidden on this and former oc- 
casions. You are tired of balls and dinners, you hate to discuss 
the latest book, your neighbors' affairs do not concern you, and 
sentimentality is not to be thought of?" he glanced at her question- 
ingly as he spoke. She blushed and said nothing. " The weather 
seems to be the only inexhaustible subject," he continued in a half- 
despairing tone of voice. 

"Oh, no, indeed," she replied, "there are a thousand other 
things, politics, for instance, which bore me to death, but are of 
great interest to some people — and — and — " 

" One subject which I have mentioned but once before," he in- 
terrupted, hurriedly. "May I ask you, Margery, what I fear yet 
long to know." 

"Well, really, er-I had much rather not, but — " she paused, 
"but if er-er you must I don't suppose that I er-can help it, can 
I ?" she stammered. 

"Then I will," he said determinately. 

Margery turned her head, but vouchsafed no reply. They were 
alone under a majestic oak ; the merry laughter of their friends 
reached their ears from a distance. 

" I will," he repeated, taking her hand and bending toward her, 
he whispered something which even the rustling leaves could not 
hear. 

Margery murmured a scarcely audible reply. Just then the 
melodious notes of a mocking-bird filled the air with sweetness, 
and the golden rays of the sun seemed to nestle more lovingly in 
the tree-tops. 

" Em," Margery said that night when the two girls were once 
more together, ' ' this has been the happiest day of my life — and 
Em," she added, when she kissed her sister good night, "Dick 
said that it was all the fault of my blessed old straw hat." 

Agnes Belle Goldsby. 



2246 The Euterpean. 

Stidetg $,etos. 

MARY B. GUDGER. 



— A special interest has been taken this year to have our Society 
meetings both beneficial and enjoyable. So far each program has 
helped to carry out the scheme successfully. The girls have been 
more interested than ever before in the hour spent together on 
Friday evenings. 

— One evening was given to a game, " A Tour of the Nations." 
This was very interesting, and we enjoyed it thoroughly. 

— The following week we had " A Longfellow Evening." Each 
girl answered the roll call with a Longfellow quotation. Miss Lena 
Sessoms read a sketch of the poet's life, and Miss Laura Williams 
read his " Wreck of the Hesperus." 

— With the next Friday came a debate, the subject being, 
"Should a girl go in Society before she is eighteen?" The nega- 
tive side won. We congratulate Miss Agnes Belle Goldsby and 
Miss Frances Powers. 

— A Beethoven evening was greatly enjoyed also. Miss Hannah 
Dewey read quite an interesting sketch of Beethoven's life, and his 
"Moonlight Sonata" was beautifully rendered by Miss Eva Harris. 

— We are now reading " Wanted — a Chaperon " together. The 
book was presented by a former member, Miss Grace Cunningham. 
It is highly appreciated by us all. We are glad to have it because 
she so kindly gave it to us and because it was the last book written 
by Paul Leicester Ford. 

— We are pleased to welcome Miss Marie Reynolds as a member 
of our Society. 

— We Euterpeans were delightfully entertained by the Hespe- 
rians on Friday night, Oct. 24th. It was purely a social evening, 
and we one and all heartily enjoyed the way in which our sister 
society welcomed us in their midst. The "gym" was beautifully 
decorated, and the old fashioned "Donkey Party" was the chief 
amusement. Dainty refreshments were also served. The prizes 
were won by Misses Leonora Johnston, Pauline Sessoms and Mati- 
ella Cocke. 



The Euterpean. 2247 

— Formerly it was the custom for the Societies to give a play 
about Easter time each year. This year it was decided to have two 
entertainments and give them both before Christmas, so the girls 
of 1902 may enjoy the improvements made in the halls as well as 
the new girls who come in 1903 The first entertainment, "The 
Peak Sisters," was given in the College Chapel, Thursday evening, 
November 13. There were thirteen of the Sisters, and they were 
accompanied by the Salem Orchestra, which proved to be no less 
than twenty-four of the girls, who, with their dark raglans, beaver 
hats and neat white collars and cuffs, made up a splendid second 
Salem Orchestra. The Peak Sisters are supposed to hail from New 
Guinea, and we can well believe they did, for their program was 
truly unique and original. 

Adah Petway, - - The Piima Donna. 

Maud Buliuck, Lazy Peak with a P.omising Voice. 

Amy Sloan, ) ~, ~ • , 

t^ J t^-iu 1 - - A ne I win Peaks. 

Katie Kilbuck, j 

Viola Saunders, - - The Cross Peak. 

Corinne Baskin, - - The Giggling Peak. 

Frances Powers, - The Deaf and Dumb Peak. 

'sabelle Rice, - The Dramatic Reader. 

Naialine Haynes, - - The Demure Peak. 

Mary Gudger, - - Peanut Fiend. 

Bess Warren, - - - The Orator. 

Carrie Levy, - - The Irrepressible Peak. 

The girls of the Orchestra were : Maude Foy, Mary Adams v 
Lulu McEachern, Mary McEachern, Eliza Knox, Glen McDonald, 
Agnes Belle Goldsby, Mary Culpepper, Ruth Matthews, Bessie 
Sloan, Pauline Sessoms, Bertha Hall, Mary Watlington, Aline 
Roueche, Florence DeShazo, May Morrison, Hannah Dewey, Mary 
Wood, Bessie Hughes, Bessie Gold, Ruby McCorkle. They were 
skilfully led by Miss Eva Harris. 

" Where are you going, my pretty maid ?" 
"To a quiz, of course, sir," she said. 
"Who goes with you, my doleful maid ?" 
" My dear self and pencils, -sir," she said. 

"What will you do, my gentle maid ?" 

" Flunko, flunkere, flunctum, sir," she said. 

" Why will you fail, my ' quizzy ' maid ?" 

" 'Cause quizical quizes quiz me, sir," she said* 

Then from Senior Class to A Class, 
Comes the word : " Did you pass ?" 
And we hope that each will not relate: 
"Fiunku is the verb /conjugate." 

— A. B. G. 



2248 The Hesperian. 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Katie M. Kilbuck — Editor-in-chief. 
Sadie M. Rollins — Assistant Editor. 
Adah A. Petway— Literary Editor. 
Florence Moorman — Exchange Editor. 
Louise F. Harper — Business Manager. 



lETritortal department. 



— We announce with deep regret the resignation of Miss Amy R. 
Sloan as Editor-in-chief of the Hesperian portion of the recently 
enlarged periodical, — The Academy. We regret it especially as 
the mantle has fallen on us. We had hoped that the mantle would 
not fit : we find, however, that it is sufficiently large to cover a mul- 
titude of mistakes which we, the inexperienced, necessarily make. 
It hung so gracefully upon the shoulders of our predecessor, whose 
versatility of pen needs no comment from us, as all who have read 
her editorials and the selections made by her able judgment have 
abundant proof. We regret that one of the infirmities of old age, 
weak eye-sight, has compelled her to resign her position, for really 
she is very old, she is almost out of her teens. We ask our read- 
ers to bear with our inexperience, resulting from extreme youth- 
fulness, and if our sentences are not as graceful, our periods as well 
rounded, our expressions as terse, our thoughts as profound, our 
imagination as glowing now as hers, when we have become as aged 
and infirm we hope to obtain the same excellence. 



— Don't be thoughtless in the selection of gifts for your friends. 
Have them useful, durable, and the best of their kind. 



The Hesperian. 2249 

— The pianola's cousin, the pianotist, is now on exhibition at the 
Piedmont Music Store. It is, like the pianola, an attachment for 
the piano by means of which a person who knows nothing of music, 
by working two pedals, apparently causes the piano to play itself. 
The mysterious performer is hidden in something like a drawer 
pulled out from under the key-board, and is found to contain pre- 
pared rolls of music and an apparatus that works the keys of the 
piano. Unlike the pianola it keeps itself out of sight 



An Impromptu Debate. 



"Girls, is shopping a gift or an acquired accomplishment?'' 
gaily asked LeMar Coleman as she bounded into the Seniors' liv- 
ing room of Salem College one November afternoon. The girls ad- 
dressed were six in number, one of whom was embroidering, while 
another was reading ; two others were on the couch conversing, 
while the remaining two were busy letter writing. 

Grace Jooked up from her embroidery promptly, and replied : 

" It is a gift, certainly. It is impossible to shop unless it is born 
in you, so to speak." 

"Nonsense," said Agatha, laying aside her book, "You can 
learn to shop just as you can learn to do anything else " 

"But can you learn to do everything?" asked Helen. "A 
person who hasn't a pretty voice will never learn to sing pleasingly 
no matter how much training she is given. Isn't shopping a talent : 
able to be improved, but not acquired?" 

" Not a bit of it !" was Emily's assertion. You can learn to shop 
just as you can take lessons in house-keeping or in sewing. It is, 
like these are, a duty not a talent which we cultivate as we do sing- 
ing or painting " 

"Say. I'm writing a letter to mother," said Eleanor, "and how 
can I do it well if you girls speak so loudly ? If you want to debate 
the question of shopping's being an ait or an accomplishment 
please do so more quietly." 

"My, but you're saucy, Eleanor!" snapped Agatha. Then, 
half apologetically, "But we were growing noisy. Hurry with 
your letter and join in the discussion. We'd like to hear your 
views on the subject." 

"All right, returned Eleanor, " you're forgiven, and I'll do as 
you say." 



2250 The Hesperian. 

" Oh, girls ! I'd almost forgotten that I had a box of Huyler's," 
came from LeMar. " I'll go and bring it here ; then we can finish 
this discussion the more enjoyably if we can busy ourselves by eat- 
ing as we talk." 

" Oh, Jove !" lazily drawled out Marguerite, who had not spoken 
until now, " you girls are the greatest ' speelers ' I've ever run up 
against. What tragedy does it play whether shopping is a talent 
or a dnty ? It is what it is and nothing you can say can change it. 
So don't get excited. I'm going up stairs and take a nap before 
dressing for dinner. So, good by, I'll see you later." And off 
she went. 

When Le Mar returned she was laughing heartily, and greeted 
us with 

" Do I look the same? Marguerite was turning a corner at the 
foot of the stairs. Evidently her thoughts were miles off for she 
bumped into me and the candy with no infantile force. Realizing 
that she had nearly knocked me down she said, in her tantalizingly 
slow way : ' Do excuse me, Le Mar. I didn't see you at first. Did 
you think I "was trying to cripple your face so your friends wouldn't 
know you ? I humbly beg your pardon for letting you break your 
candy box over my clean dress ! Come on, we'll pick up the fallen 
chocolates.' This we did, after which Marguerite wended her 
weary way up stairs, and I came here to you people." 

While Le Mar was relating this incident she opened the box of 
candy, and the girls were already enjoying its contents. 

" And now to continue our debate," said Grace. " We all know 
that a person who can't shop is always at a loss as to what sort of 
goods is appropriate for her dinner gown ; which sort is suitable 
for a calling frock, or a walking suit. When she's shopping she is 
as out of place as a 'bull in a china shop.' " 

"That is deviating some, Grace," said Helen. "Your last 
words were of taste and not strictly of shopping." 

"Well, hold," returned Grace, "that good taste is a requisite 
of shopping." 

" Oh, I see," broke in Emily, but I still maintain that one can 
learn how to shop " 

"Say, Le Mar, as your stand in this discussion is a neutral one, 
judge which side is to win," suggested Agatha, smiling contentedly 
over a chocolate marshmallow- 

"I'll be glad* to try," returned LeMar, "but you all think so 
well on the subject it will be hard to make a decision." 



The Hesperian. 2251 

" Here's some good news for you, girls," called Dorothy Man- 
nering from the doorway. "The carpenters have finished their 
work on the Laboratory and it's a dream of convenience and good 
looks now. Come over and take in the situation with me now, 
won't you ?" 

" Most gladly ?" came from LeMar, whose words were taken up 
by all the rest of the Seniors in the room. Off they all went to see 
the laboratory since the improvements upon it were completed, and 
for the time being it was forgotten " whether shopping was a gift 
or an acquired accomplishment." 

a. r. s., '03. 

13aofcs of tije Hag. 

ADAH A. PETWAY. 



THE READABLE BOOKS FOR NOVEMBER. 



"The Virginian," Owen Wister. 
" Hearts Courageous," Hallie Erminie Rives. 
"Castle Craneycrow," McCutcheon 
"The Starbucks," Opie Read. 
" Donovan Pasha." 

"Wanted — A Chaperon," by Paul Leicester Ford, is, indeed, 
a natty little edition worthy of the holidays now approaching. 



— In the year 1738 Dr. Samuel Johnston went to London. He 
afterwards became one of the three literary kings of England, Pope 
and Dryden being the other two. 

Dr. Johnston had discovered that all poets and authors of his 
country gained prominence not by the merit of their writings but 
by securing some wealthy and influential friends who would praise 
his work, and in this way bring it to the front. Samuel Johnston 
made it his special aim in life to dispense with this literary patron- 
age, as it was called, so that one's works might live after them for 
their own merit. He succeeded, and thus it was that Dr. John- 
ston gave the death blow to literary patronage, and now there is 
but " the survival of the fittest." 



2252 The Academy. 

Hurrah for the Juniors ! 



Wednesday evening - , November the twenty- sixth will always be 
remembered by the Seniors as being one of the most enjoyable oc- 
casions of their Class era. The daintiness of the invitations was 
a fitting prelude to the daintiness and quaintness of the whole oc- 
casion. A pleasing bustle of preparation pervaded the whole 
house. 

At eight o'clock the escorts appeared for their respective part- 
ners, and soon the handsomely decorated Junior rooms were filled 
with the happy company, evidently from all parts of the world. 
General and Mrs. Lee stood near the door, graciously receiving 
the unique company, and presenting them to their winning gran- 
daughters, Elizabeth and Marguerite Lee. Although the General 
appeared quite feeble, by the help of his devoted partner he was 
enabled to perform the duties of host with his usual urbanity. 

Here a jaunty little Persian, with red fez and elegant scarf; Gov- 
ernor Tryon, with his aristocratic wife and sister ; the Persian lady 
with her veil half concealing, half revealing the eyes, conversed 
with Madame Lafayette, Mrs. Stonewall Jackson, Mrs. Schuyler, 
Mrs. Winthrop, Martha Washington and Molly Stark. The Puri- 
tans, Cavaliers and Colonial Dames were on good terms with each 
other, looking with indulgent smiles on the antics of the little ones 
who, with rattles and bells, had been permitted to sit up beyond 
their usual hour. 

A very interesting guessing game was provided, which caused 
much "jest and youthful jollity." The first prize was won by Miss 
Adah Petway, and the " booby" by Mrs. Goldsby. 

While the guests were partaking of the "food of the gods" they 
were delightfully entertained by the vioiinist, who rendered several 
selections, and it was with reluctance that they bid the charming 
hostesses adieu. 



A SELFISH PLEA. 



Cora — " And why should I think twice before I refuse you?" 
Merritt — "Because, my dear, a girl never thinks the same 
twice " 



— It is the man who stutters that has very little to say about 
ping-pong — Smart Set 



The Academy. 2253 

Hecate. 



— The Moravian Synod met in Salem this month, and quite a 
large number of delegates attended. On Wednesday afternoon at 
four o'clock a recital was given in the Chapel complimentary to 
them. 

— Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Kreider, Principal and Lady Principal of 
Linden Hall Seminary, spent a week with Dr. and Mrs. Clewell. 
We all enjoyed having them with us, and only hope that they 
will repeat their visit some time in the near future. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Norfleet have arrived in Winston, which 
place is to be their future home. Mrs. Norfieet was a Hesperian 
while attending the Academy. We were all more than glad to see 
her, and the Society wishes her much happiness. 

— At our last Society meeting we agreed to meet every other 
Friday night instead of every week as has been the custom. Two 
weeks would then elapse between each meeting, giving the officers 
more time to prepare a more lengthy and beneficial program, which 
would last from forty to sixty minutes instead of fifteen or twenty. 
We hipe that this plan will prove m.ost successful. 

— The annual play of the two Societies was given on Thursday 
nij. 1 ?\ Nov. 13th. It was quite different from former years, and 
the girls deserve a great deal of credit for the enjoyment of the 
evening. 



— New Yorker (to visiting Englishman) — So the man who adver- 
tise« to tell you for a dollar the best way to make the least money 
go ihe farthest has answered your letter, eh ? What does he say ?" 

The Englishman (mystified) — "He says: 'Buy a penny postal 
care and write on it to some one in the Philippines.' Now, how 
should the — aw — blooming people in the Philippines know more 
about such financial matters than any body else?" — Judge. 



2254 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston-? alem. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2255 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say: 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about your people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W. Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says : " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 

By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 -maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLEE & SON, 

WINSTOZT-SALE31, JV. C. 



2256 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL. 



"We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line of 

.......NOTIONS,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-8ALEM, IN. C 



The Academy. 2257 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 

EST < H 1A3ST UP TO ME LIES 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 

that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 

LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

EOSENBACHEES 
DEPARTMENT STOEES. 



2258 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

OAK RIDGE, _ZV. C. 

(near salesi) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 

The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES. 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H HOLT, Prins. 

"When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in. 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomely illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January joth, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham SchooH902-03 

Located on the Asheville Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per halt-term. Address Col. R. Bixgham, Supt., Post Office, Asheville, N. C 



The Academy. 2259 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBEE, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 

§0UTf)GRD RAILOJAY. 



The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, P. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N. C. C.P.& T. A., Ashevlile.N.C 

PRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARD WICK, 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D . C. 



226o 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED t?94. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for cataloguo. 

JAS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 

YOU 

WANT 

THE 

SHOE 

THAT'S 

ALL 

THE 

GO? 



IF 

SO 

SEE 

US 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOIsriES- 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best lhat the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 



At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 



Reference Salem Fema'e Academy 



THE ACADEMY. 



Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C, December, 1902. No. 225. 

Entered as second-class mattergin the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



ISTittotial. 



— To our readers, one and all, we extend our best wishes for a 
blessed and happy New Year ! 



— A^longer recess than usual was given this Christmas, from 
Dec. 20th to Jan. 2d. The result was that a larger number of 
pupils remained to the close of recitations and thus gained their 
recitation marks. 



— The article on " Zintka Lanuni," will be fmnd to be of inter- 
est, and recalls a period in our history in the Western States filled 
with sorrows and terrors. 



— The Christmas celebration in the Home church was as beauti- 
ful|andfattractive as eve . A number of pupils who had intended 
to return to their homes decided to remain in Salem to participate 
in this celebration. They will never regret the decision, for those 
who spend a Christmas in Salem will carry the memories of this 
happy occasion all through life. 



2262 The Academy. 

— As we prepare this number of The Academy the old year is 
drawing rapidly to a close, and when it has closed we will have 
ended a year memorable in our history. The Centennial Year was 
looked forward to for a long time. It came, and is now about to 
pass away. Within its 365 days have been gathered momentous 
experiences. The celebration was a notable one; the awakening 
of slumbering friendships was a pleasing feature ; the impetus given 
to Alumnae Memorial Hall was a satisfaction to the friends of the 
School ; the marked beginning of the endowment movement wit- 
nessed a new epoch which, within the next generation or two, will 
place the School upon a broader plane of usefulness than it has 
ever occupied in the past ; and shall we omit to note the high stan- 
point taken in matters of conduct and of religion. All these things 
and many others not named cause us to bless the old year 
now passing away as we write, and to return thanks to Almighty 
God for his special favor to us during 1902. 



— During the opening months of 1903 into which we now enter 
many pupils will be preparing for one or another class in Septem- 
ber. We will be glad to enter into correspondence with such pros- 
pective pupils, or their teachers, in order that necessary prepara- 
tory work may be done. As the "quiz" papers are now being 
printed, it will be easy to furnish these papers to the proper parties, 
and though they must not be understood to be "examination pa- 
pers," that is papers embodying the questions necessary to entrance 
into a certain class, still a "quiz" paper will give an idea of the 
work done in one or another class, and will act as a guide to shape 
the work of the prospective September pupil. 



— We will mail a number of copies of The Academy to former 
subscribers whose subscription has lapsed, and on the cover we 
mark " sample copy." We request you to again become a sub- 
sriber, believing that the paper in its enlarged form will be a wel- 
come visitor to the homes of our friends and former pupils. In 
order to increase the circulation in 1903 we make this appeal to our 
former readers and trust that we may have the pleasure of again 
adding your name to our list of subscribers. 



The Academy. 2263 

— A number of orders for " History of Wachovia in North Caro- 
lina" have been received during the past days from former pupils. 
Believing that many more will be interested in this recently pub- 
lished history of Salem and the school, we make the following 
offer: 

To any one desiring to purchase a copy of the above-named 
book and to become a subscriber or renew a subscription to The 
Academy, we will club the two under the following conditions : 

Regular price of History of Wachovia (see adv), $2.00 
The Academy, subscription for one year, 50 

We will send the book postpaid to any address, and will enter the 
subscription for The Academy for one year, the two for $2.00. 



— The "quiz" hours in November and December were emi- 
nently successful, stimulating the pupils, increasing the interest in 
the work, and showing to each pupil what is her actual standing. 
The promotions will, this year, depend upon four records : the 
regularity of attendance ; the result of the "quiz" hours; the 
daily class records ; the final examinations in May. These four 
requirements are not essentially different from the requirements of 
the past, still they do differ in some respects in that the tests are 
more rigid and the results are surer. The plans as laid down will 
advance the standard of requirements for class entrance. 



— At a recent meeting of the Faculty the following decision was 
reached for the "quiz " work for the Spring term. The 3d week 
in January a "quiz" will be held in the branches included in the 
November plan ; the third week in February the December sub- 
jects will be covered. In March the January topics will again be 
taken up, and in April the February studies. The ten days pre- 
vious to Commencement will be in part used for the regular exam- 
inations with a view to class promotions. Early in January the 
complete list of subjects, days and hours, both for the "quiz" 
work and the examinations will be printed and the pupils can then 
systematically work forward to the several occasions as indicated 
on the printed list. 



2264 The Academy. 

— We call attention to Miss Bonney's article on the work in the 
Science Department. The school has spent a considerable sum of 
money to prepare to give the very best in this department, and 
Miss Bonney is sparing no pains to make the work thorough and 
to instill enthusiasm in her pupils A visit to this busy " bee hive" 
of workers will convince arty one that the efforts will be crowned 
with success. 



— The organization of the various classes, even in the prepara- 
tory school, will enable us to carry out many plans for the good of 
the work which without such organization would be very difficult. 



Our Science Department. 



BY MISS BONNEY. 



"The process of education, in a broad sense, may be defined as 
that by which external conditions or appliances are made by the 
action of an Agent the means of unfolding or developing symmet- 
rically all the legitimate possibilities of a single life." If this quo- 
tation is true then education is a growth, a development of the 
abilities and possibilities implanted in each one by the divine 
Creator, and necessitates an agent of instruction, a pupil, and in- 
strumentalities or appliances by means of which the teacher affects 
the pupil. In education, as in manual labor, the acquisition of the 
habit or art of doing is the important thing. A perfect knowledge 
of the rules of Rhetoric does not imply that the possessor of that 
knowledge has "the pen of a ready writer." Nor does the com- 
mitting to memory of the facts of Electricity make an electrician. 
A true student is an investigator ; seeking for what is unknown to 
him, but known to others, he may develop into a discoverer. How 
may this be accomplished ? By observation through the senses ; 
by means of instruments ; by aid of apparatus ; by experimenta- 
tion. But no matter how expert a carpenter may be, he cannot 
without tools pursue his trade. It is for the purpose, therefore, of 
developing many of the possibilities of life, of aiding our pupils to 
form habits of doing — of acquiring systematized knowledge that the 
Trustees of Salem Academy and College have built and are equip- 
ping a Laboratory which, when completed, will reflect added honor 



The Academy. 2265 

on an institution already known for its attempts to promote earnest, 
thorough work on the part of teacher and pupil. 

The Laboratory is now a bright, airy room, provided with indi- 
vidual work-tables of the most approved pattern, with closet, draw- 
ers, etc. Also furnished with gas and water, chemicals and neces- 
sary apparatus. Thus every one of the seventy Chemistry pupils 
may make her own original investigations. The Botany classes 
will be provided with simple and compound microscopes, and the 
chemicals and apparatus needed in botanical investigation and ex- 
periments. The same may be said of the classes in Physics and 
Physiology. 

Prof. Burnham says : " The great maxim of Modern Reform in 
education is the activity of the pupil instead of the didactics of the 
teacher. This activity we endeavor to awaken and stimulate. A 
student may know every law of Physics, commit to memory the 
formulas of chemistry, name every organ of the body, and yet what 
are they more to him than mere words, not real things. What 
does a lump of sugar, a crystal of salt convey to his mind exeept a 
few external properties, but when by experimentation he has dis- 
covered that the white, sweet solid is composed of two gases, one 
highly inflammable, the other an active supporter of combustion, — 
and a black solid, then and not till then does he realize the wonders 
of creation, the greatness and power of the great Creator, and that 
the Psalmist spoke truly when he said : "The heavens declare the 
glory of God and the firmament showeth his handiwork." Will 
he be satisfied with one discovery ? No ! The desire to know the 
how and the why is awakened, the habit of doing in order to dis- 
cover a reason is born. 

We propose, therefore, whether ihe subject taught be Physi- 
ology, the study of the most wonderful mechanism known, or 
Botany, showing us the wonderful provision of Nature for our sus- 
tenance and pleasure, — for who loves flowers and does not feel 
that 

r " Flowers are thoughts of the Spirit of God, 

Their love is love of his grace, 

Their fragrance is breath of divinity, 

Their beauty, the light of his face- ' 

Or whether it be Chemistry — "that deep well" of knowledge 
" undefined," leading us almost into the mysteries o r creat on — or 
Physics, the study of the whys and wherefores of great forces in 



2266 The Academy. 

each, we propose to stimulate our pupils to personal research and 
experimentation. We wish to give them the same opportunities 
enjoyed by their brothers in colleges. Directly as well as indirectly 
laboratory work affects every other department of education, and 
strongly influences the best traits of character. Not only habits of 
observation but correctness of observation are formed ; neatness ; 
orderliness ; diligent and patient perseverance in manipulation and 
habits ol careful and quick thinking are fostered. 

We have also introduced into the curriculum a Normal Course 
for teachers and those expecting to become teachers. This year 
Physiology was elected, and we are paying particular attention to 
methods of instruction, and the minute study- of the body. We 
propose to have a course of Lectures on Hygiene during the sec 
ond semester, especially for the Junior and Senior Classes, but open 
to all interested in the subject. 

We would be glad to have our patrons and friends visit our lab- 
oratory, though we will not promise to always greet them with 
sweet and refreshing odors, — for we are even cultivating onions in 
our flower pots. 



ZINTKA LANUNI, 
The Waif of Wounded Knee. 



The following article from The Woman s Tribune, of February 
21, 1891, will be read with interest for two reasons. First because 
of the events themselves, and second because of the fact that in a 
letter from Mrs Colby, we are informed that later in this month she 
will bring the little girl, now a child of 12 years or more, to the 
Academy as a pupil. 

Indian trinkets, elk teeth, necklaces, bows and arrows, war-clubs, 
tomahawks, and hundreds of articles of various kinds and charac- 
ter, are disposed of in the cities and towns of the United States, as 
valued relics of the late great Indian uprising in South Dakota. 

The long fasting of the Brules, Ogallalas, and other Sioux tribes 
the wild and wierd ghost dances, continued for weeks ; the persist- 
ent work of Red Cloud, Young-Man- Afraid-Of-His- Horses, Rocky 
Bear, No-Neck, and other friendly chiefs, in the interest of peace, 
the massing of about eight thousand troops of the Regular Army, 
under command of Gen. Nelson A. Miles, and of two regiments of 
the Nebraska National Guard, under the command of Gen. L. W. 



The Academy. 2267 

Colby, upon and near the great Sioux Reservation in Dakota and 
Nebraska, are familiar facts to the American reading public. Also 
the subsequent developments, including many of the incidents of 
of the slaughter of Big Foot and his band, the attempt to fire the 
Agency buildings and the Mission School, and the withdrawal of 
the four thousand hostile Indians to the Bad Lands are equally well 
known. 

There are many prized trophies obtained by army officers and 
citizens, of the leading scenes and characters in this great Indian 
uprising ; but the relics most valuable are associated in the public 
mind with the terrible incidents of the massacre on Wounded Knee 
Creek. The war-bonnets, Indian clubs, ghost shirts and bloody 
garments, all have their historic interest and significance, but one 
of the most pathetic mementoes of the annihilation of Big Foot and 
his one hundred and twenty warriors and their families, is the bright, 
seven-months old Indian baby, found among the dead upon the 
field, four days after the battle and obtained by General Colby, of 
Nebraska. The following is a brief statement of the occurences 
and facts relating to this important event in the life of the little 
survivor. 

Colonel Forsythe, with General Custer's old regiment, was 
ordered to take and disarm the Indian Chief Big Foot and his band 
of warriors who were encamped with their wives and children on 
Wounded Knee Creek, about 8 miles east of Pine Ridge Agency. 
The camp of a hundred and twenty lodges was at once surrounded 
by over five hundred well armed soldiers, and the process of dis- 
arming commenced. The Indians although not openly hostile, 
were filled with bitterness at their wrongs, and at what they thought 
was the bad faith of the Government in failing to issue them the 
full amount of beef. They had heard that their brothers, the war- 
like Apaches of Arizona and New Mexico, had been disarmed, 
sent to Florida and imprisoned in Old Fort Morgan, at St. Augus- 
tine ; thence taken to North Carolina, still imprisoned and held 
almost as slaves for years ; and they believed that their own disarm- 
ing was but the first step in the same dreaded fate which awaited 
them. 

A brief council and harangue from their chief'was sufficient. At 
the signal of throwing a handful of earth in the air, the savage 
shriek and war-whoop sounded across the pine bluffs and echoing 
canons ; rifles rang, hatchets were tnrown, and the uneven struggle 



2268 The Academy. 

for liberty of a hundred and twenty warriors against five hundred 
repeating rifles and four death-dealing Gatling and Hotchkiss guns 
began and closed the Battle of Wounded Knee on Monday, Decem- 
ber 29th. The gloom of evening rested upon the lifeless forms of 
some forty soldiers, and over two hundred Indians, including many 
women and children. 

Reliefs from the^Agency carried the dead and wounded soldiers, 
and many of the wounded Indians in, till the work was stopped by 
darkness. Next day came the attack on the Agency, the fire arrows 
shot into the buildings, the retreat of four thousand hostiles to the 
Bad Lands, the skirmishing at the outposts ; then the terrible snow- 
storm and blizzard and the dangers from the elements as well as 
from the ambushed savages, prevented the hospital and burial de- 
tails from finishing their duties on the field of the massacre. How- 
ever, on Thursday, January 1, 1891, the fourth day after the battle, 
as the sad work was resumed, there was found on the field, by the 
side of a dead woman, partly covered with snow, a dusky baby 
girl, alive and well. The child was apparently about seven months 
old and was only slightly frozen upon her head and feet. She had 
been snugly held in the pappoose " postant " or bonnet, by the 
lifeless mother's body, during all those days of darkness, carnage 
and storm ; and the snow had kindly covered her with its blanket. 
She was at once taken to the'Jodge of an Indian called Yellow Bird, 
where she was cared for, for a week or more, when she was allowed 
to be removed to the hostile camp, which was then only two miles 
from the Pine Ridge Agency. General Colby, who is said to have 
some Indian blood in his veins, was touched by the pathos of the 
story of the little waif, and through the assisiance of two ladies, 
wives of the Asay brothers, store-keepers at the Agency, induced 
Yellow Bird to go with him to the hostile camp, where he found, 
and after considerable difficulty, obtained the child. 

When the hostiles surrendered and the troops returned, the Gen- 
eral took her to his home in Nebraska, and adopted her as his own 
child, giving her the melancholy but musical and soft-sounding In- 
dian name of Zintka Lanuni, which means " Lost Bird." 

The little dusky maid, although a full bloo 1 Indian of the most 
warlike and uncivilised race, seems to take kindly to all the favors 
of civilization. She is well formed, she has a pleasant face and 
winning smile, regular features, and withal, a dignified and queenly 
bearing. 



The Academy. 2269 

This is a true story of Zintka Lanuni, the "Waif of Wounded 
Knee" who may be seen any day at General Colby's residence at 
Beatrice, Nebraska ; and who, living, will be one of the most inter- 
esting historic figures in the progress of that unfortunate nation, 
which in the Winter Campaign of 1890-91 brought four thousand 
warriors into the field ; and who, dying, will close the tribal inher- 
itance of Big Foot's heroic band, whom valor has made immortal, 
and whose blond should make forever sacred the murmuring waters 
of Wounded Knee. 

FROM ALUMNA AND OTHER FRIENDS. 



All communications for this Department should be addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N -'. C Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
from former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



We give below a communication bearing upon the happy Cen- 
tennial season. There are many communications on file, relating 
to this event, and as these letters are of such a nature that they will 
not suffer by the lapse of time, we will print them from time to time 
as we have space in the successive issues of our paper. The letter 
which follows ia from Miss Jeanie Wood, and gives information re- 
garding a number of her Class Mates : 

. Reunion of Class of '95. 

" Well girls, we met after all, and you who did not come missed 
a treat. Such a pleasant merry meeting it was in spite of a touch 
of sadness when the roll was called and no one responded to Sue 
Winston's name, and Mary Millis made no response and Laura 
Douthit was silent. There was no one to speak for them for no 
tidings came from the land over the way. But there was so much 
gladness in spite of the sadness and so much fun in recalling the 
old school days, that gloom found no place for the sole of his foot 
and hobbled away in disgust. 

"After the President's speech, the roll was called and those 
present, nineteen in all, told us what they had been doing, but do 
you know we really discovered more about those who were not 
there than about those who were there. For instance, there was 
Mary Osterbind to be married in June, didn't tell us a word about 
it, though it was suggested that the occasion was a fitting one to 



2270 The Academy. 

invite the Class to any weddings in the near future. While " old " 
Maggie Borum who was not there was known to have rocked her 
self clean through single blessedness to the border of matrimony 
and she too is to be married in June. 

" Sadie and Ivey Walker were both there. Sadie is teaching and 
Ivey is at home filling in the gaps. Both bright and happy as ever. 

" Florence Brown was with us and Mamie Roberts who has been 
teaching last winter. 

" Mabel Butner is in the Academy happy in her work and sing- 
ing most delightfully and has a rich full voice and it is a treat to 
hear her. She sang several times during Commencement. 

" Lucy Leinbach is at home and has been cultivating her voice 
also. Lucy sang with Mrs. Fries and Mabel at a Centennial 
Concert. 

" Bertha Shelton was not present, not having been duly notified 
of the time for meeting. She, we are told, is quite a belle. 

" Caro Buxton was graduated from Bryn Mawr in 1901, and bears 
her degree with as much modest grace as ever she wore her cap 
and gown. 

" Ella Lehman was in town but not at the meeting owing to some 
misunderstanding. Ella has been North studying vocal and appar- 
ently to some effect. She is not a bean pole now and has so far 
overcome her bashfulness that I believe she will have no more 
trouble on that score. 

" Nannie Bessent told us that she had joined the teaching sister- 
hood, so has Katie Sutton and Maggie and Annie Morton thus these 
three could not be with us. 

" Hattie Ollinger is just the same and has the camera craze. She 
told us that Alma Chafhn West has a little son, (I forget his age) 
and is living happily in Milton. 

" Pearl Sydnor White had to come without Ruby Spainhour as 
she is sick and could not travel. It was the first time we had known 
the twins to separate. It was easy to decide which one was with us. 

"Julia Jones came to Salem but not in time for the reunion. She 
has a nice little girl whom she left at home. We wanted so much 
to see her. 

" Daisy Vaughn Gilmer told us how she and "Dutch" were 
married. All of us from Miss Lehman down were immensely 
amused. 

" Lilla Young, the society lady, has gone into the teaching busi- 



The Academy. 2271 

ness. I must say she doesn't look old enough to be a prim school 
madam. 

" DovieChedester was there, same as ever and Ella Stroupe Har- 
per, now of Wilmington, looking entirely too yonng for the step- 
mother of such big children as she has. 

" Agnes Garboden Wiggs has as you see became a married lady 
and she looks the same as she always did. 

" Lucy Chadbourn is still Lucy Chadbourn, but we heard rumors. 

"Blanche Thornton promised to come and didn't, so did Ina 
Smitherman, they owe us an explanation. 

" Alma Tise, Myrtle Stype, Bertha Miller and Bertha Lloyd are 
all in Winston and write their names just as you see them above. 
Though time has lengthened their names have kept the same. 

" Lucy Teague Fassett wrote about her nice "Yankee" husband 
whom she hoped to bring to Salem, but they couldn't come after 
all. Lucy sent greeting to the Class and best wishes. 

" Nell Cummings Penn and Florence Young Penn could not be 
with us, though we heard that Nell fully expected to come. 

" Ethel Weaver says Mr. L. T. Sloan persuaded her to abandon 
teaching and keep house for him. 

"They tell us that Pamela Goodman is very handsome. She 
married Mr. Giraud, of Williams, Arizona. 

" Mena Hege is now Mrs. Walter Brown, of Winston. 

" Florence Glenn Parkinson, of Richmond, Va., could not bring 
her baby and so had to stay at home this time. 

"Jennie Crouch lives in Cartersville, Ga. We had hoped to have 
her with us. 

" Sallie Adams has just returned from Texas, where she has been 
visiting. We regreted that she could not come on to Salem. 

" Bessie Foy was disappointed about coming and Alice Rawley 
and Sallie Bonner were neither there nor wrote about themselves. 

" Mary Lawson and Mary Johnson could not be accounted for. 
No one had heard from them in ages. 

" We much regreted to hear of Sallie Smith's ill health and hope 
she will improve when she hears news of her old friends. 

" Mamie Lee Curtis still lives in Waco, Texas. I am very sorry 
I have no news to tell concerning her. 

" Nettie Allen is our bride, having been married in February last. 
She is well and happy. 

" Mrs. R. O. Fry alias Minnie Smitherman still lives in Troy. 



2272 The Academy. 

"Your President is still teaching and at present has no idea of 
discontinuing her work. 

" Now dear girls will you not do me a great favor ? Please every 
one of the girls except those in Winston-Salem, write me a postal 
with your full address on it so that I may start the Class Letter. 
Even those who have written lately write again so that I may know 
exactly where you are. In this way we can get the letter going 
again and keep it on its errand, if you marry I will be so glad to 
have a postal given your new name and address. Please do not 
forget this. 

" I particularly desire news of Mary Johnson and Alice Rawley. 
I have an idea where the others are but these are beyond my 
knowledge. Write soon so that we can begin our Letter. 

" Very lovingly, 

" Jeanie D. Wood. 

"No. 201 Chestnut St., Wilmington, N. C." 

— Mr. Schropp, of Pennsylvania, send us $5.00, for a ten years' 
subscription, and adds the following good wishes : 

" I note by the endorsement on the wrapper of the September 
number that my subscription has expired. Enclosed rind check to 
pay for 10 years to come. 

"May your publication meet with the success it deserves, and of 
that there ought to be no question, with such an array of Alumnae 
to draw from as the Institution you represent can boast of. 

"Now that Professor Patterson has opened communication with 
" Mars," I would suggest to you — if I may be permitted to do so, 
to send a few copies of The Academy to that planet. 

" I reckon the University of Georgia would cheerfully furnish the 
names of responsible parties who would only need to be informed 
of the widespread influence for good exerted by the School on the 
planet we inhabit, to enlist their hearty co operation in the still 
further extension of that influence in our neighbor " Mars." 
" Sincerely yours, 

"Abraham Schropp." 

— From Richmond, Va., a good and true friend sends us a line 
of congratulation on our new form for The Academy : 

"I received the new Academy last month, and ever since it 
came have been intending to write and tell you how much I like it. 
It is indeed an improvement on the old form, and, of course, I will 
be especially interested in the news from the Euterpean Society. 



The Academy. 2273 

"From the account of your Summer trip, I know it must have 
been a delightful one and I am still looking forward with great 
pleasure to the time when you will come up to Virginia and pay a 
visit to your old pupils in and around Richmond. 

" Enclosed you find will my subscription for The Academy for 
the enduing year. 

" Remember me to Mr. Pfohl, Prof Shirley, and to all those who 
remember me. With love for Mrs. Clewell, and wishing you a most 
prosperous year, I am, 

" Very sincerely, 

" Grace Beale Cunningham. 
"Tuesday, Nov. 4th, 1902." 

— Mr. C. B. Pfohl, speaking of his trip to Ansonville, McColl, 
Bennettsville and other places, says : 

" I was met at the station in Wadesboro, at 10:30 at night by 
Mr. L L. Little and went to Ansonville, a distance of n mile.'-, and 
spent day and night there. Visited Mr. D. R. Dunlap (father of 
Ethel Dunlap) and several other iriends and old pupils. 

"At McColl stopped at Mr. McEachern's and was met by Mr. 
Adams and Miss Hattie. Visited Mrs. Breeden (Anna Adams), Mrs. 
Douschka Pass Adams, and through the kindness of Mr. Adams 
several other friends in the neighborhood of Mr. Adams' home and 
the Bennettsville section. 

"I spent a couple of days in McColl at Mr. McEachern's and 
one day visiting Mrs. Bristow (Maggie McEachern), Mary Mangum 
and other friends." 



JEatrten. 



Griffin — Patterson. — At the First Presbyterian Church, Winston, N. 
C, Dec. 23, 1902, Mr. John Calvin Griffin to Miss Margaret Patter- 
son, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Patterson. 

Fowler — Cooper — In Statesville, N. C, on Dec. 23d, 1902, Mr. John 
Clealand Fowler and Miss Mattiebec, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
A. Cooper. 

Crouse— Walker. — On Dec. 23d, 1902, Mr. Jacob Crouse to Miss Etta 
Walker, both of Winston, N. C 

Harrison — Wadley. — On Dec. 18th, IQ02, at Brentwood Place, Boling- 
broke, Ga.,Mr.BENjAMiN Franklin Harrison to Miss Virginia Wadley. 

Flournoy — Jones. — On Dec. 31, 1902, at Rose Lawn, Cartersville, Ga., 
Mr. David McCaw Flournoy to Miss Laura Henry, daughter of Rev. 
Sam Jones. After Jan. 1st they will be at home in Paducah, Ky. 

HKtfr. 



Gray. — In Winston, Dec. 12, 1902, Mrs. W. T. Gray (Ada Dodson). 
Howard. — Mrs. Halton Howard (Mollie Gibson), of Grahamville, 
Florida. 



2274 The Euterpean. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 

L. Pauline Sessoms— Editor-in-chief. 
Mary B. Gudger — Assistant Editor. 
Frances Powers— Exchange Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby— Literary Editor. 
Corinne Baskin— Business Manager. 



3Etiitorial. 



— Among the noted men who have died recently are : — 

Herr Krupp, the great German maker of cannons and the famous 
Krupp guns. His death was brought on by some foul slanders 
which were published about him. 

Thomas Nast, the greatest caricaturist of our day, and late Con- 
sul General at Equador, South America. 

On Dec. 6, Thomas B Reed, ex speaker of the House of Rep- 
resentatives. 

Our young California novelist, Frank Norris, also died recently. 
He was only thirty-two years old, and had written several works 
of note. 



Tobogganing. 



Among the many delightful sports that are enjoyed during the 
long, cold, but very pleasant, winters of Canada is tobogganing. 

The slide is generally selected on some neighboring hill, or, if 
the country affords no such place, an imitation is built. 

Several times a week the slide is flooded over and the water mix- 
ing with the snow makes splendid coasting, down which the tobog- 
gans go with great rapidity. 

Nearlv cvr;* town b v-'.s a toboggan club. 



• The Euterpean. 2275 

The favorite time for this sport is at night, when the hill is dotted 
with lanterns if the night be dark, if not the moon provides suffi- 
cient light to guide the steerer down the icy hill. 

Each tobogganer is warmly muffled in coats and furs, crowned 
with a long woolen cap pulled so snugly over his ears that nothing 
can be seen but two bright eyes and something that with close ob- 
servation proves to be a nose. 

It is a very amusing sight to behold several little boys all jump 
on the same toboggan and fairly fly down the incline, until, per- 
haps, meeting a pile of snow, skilfully placed in the way by a mis- 
chievous little chap, the light conveyance bounces several feet in 
the air, landing its occupants head foremost in a snowdrift, where 
with much excitement they are dug out by their fellow companions. 

Not only the merry lads and lassies, but often Father is persuaded 
to join the younger folks. He is carefully placed on the finest to- 
boggan that can be found on the hill, being assured there is no 
danger ; but some way or other the light craft moves oft" before the 
guide is in his place, and away goes Father, bouncing and rolling, 
until he finds himself rapidly sliding, but minus a toboggan. This 
is, indeed, a warming exercise, but Father is generally sure of his 
man before attempting another such ride. 

Although to the spectator guiding a toboggan may appear as 
anything but difficult, further observation will prove different. The 
toboggan being so very light the slightest movement on the part of 
the occupant may cause a very serious accident. 

I am sure that all acquainted with tobogganing will agree with 
me in saying that it is one of the finest of winter sports. 



Holiday Sketches at the Old Homestead. 



Half-hidden by the overshadowing live oaks, whose branches 
brush lovingly against the red shingled roof, stands the old home- 
stead where each year we gather together from far and near to cele- 
brate the happy Christmas season. 

The young folks of the household take great delight in planning 
for the holidays long before they arrive. The boys have already 
selected the best branches of holly and the largest sprays of mis- 
tletoe, with which to decorate the walls, and the girls have decided 
which rooms will be the prettiest festooned in red and which in 



2276 The Euterpean. 

green. The trim housekeeper, in her snow-white apron, is busy 
cleaning the cupboards, or bustling about from room to room 
superintending the maids in their work, dusting, sweeping, scrub- 
bing, hanging the window shades and arranging the thousand and 
one other things which tend to beautify the home. 

The savoury odors from the kitchen announce that Martha, the 
cook, is making all kinds of goodies for the approaching festival. 

Grandma's knitting needles appear never to grow weary for bed- 
room slippers, stockings, mittens, shawls and dainty baby socks 
multiply as if by magic beneath their unceasing " click, click." 

Mother just seems to be everywhere at once, upstairs and down, 
giving a word of counsel here, stopping to take a stich in the torn 
lace of the curtain there, or straightening the rug by the parlor fire, 
and yet she finds time to finish Maude's new frock, and to darn 
the great hole in Willie's tiny blue sock, and manages to see that 
an appropriate gift shall be ready for each member of the family on 
Christmas morning. The door bell rings incessantly from morning 
till night and the smiling little darkey maid who goes to the door 
fairly staggers beneath the weight of the huge bundles and queer 
looking parcels which she carries to Mother's room, in spite of the 
children's pleadings : " Do let us see ! Oh, please, please do !" 

When Father comes home to dinner he always winks at Mother 
in the most tantalizing manner, as if to say, " We know something 
nice, don't we?" and he is in such good spirits that he forgets to 
remind Dick that little gentlemen should not eat with their knives, 
and does not notice that Alice has been helped three times to pud- 
ding, although Alec mentions that fact several times during the 
meal. 

The "wee chicks" are wild with excitement, and manage to ask 
more questions in half a minute than the wisest person alive could 
answer in a month of Sundays. They wish to know everything 
that goes on, and not unfrequently offer a helping hand, which is 
politely but firmly declined. Of course, they succeed in getting in 
every one's way, then they are scolded and kissed and sent out to 
play, and for a few moments, at least, peace reigns within doors. 

We surely have not lost our tongues amidst the hurry and scurry 
of the preparations lor they wag continually, — strange, isn't it? 
Every day we count how many hours will elapse before Brother 
comes home from college ; how long it will be before Uncle Henry 
arrives, and when Aunt Mary will be with us once more, until we 



The Euterpean. 2277 

are able to tell almost the precise minute in which to expect each 
individual uncle, aunt and cousin. 

Christmas Eve at last is here. It was so long on its way that I 
began to fear it had lost itself among the snowdrifts of the North, 
and would never reach us who dwell in the Sunny South, but after 
all it did arrive on time much to my relief. 

We are sitting together around the cheery, open fire in the old 
homestead library. Brother is leaning against the back of Mother's 
chair, and she looks so happy and proud of " our boy," as Father 
calls him. Uncle Henry has been telling us of his college pranks, 
and he and Brother have been comparing notes, and the rest of us 
have come to the conclusion that school boys are, always have been 
and always will be the same the world over. 

The children have been sent to bed, much against their will, and 
a row of stockings of various shapes and lengths adorn the nur- 
sery mantlepiece. The library door is slightly ajar, and through 
the crack we can discern the dim outline of a Christmas tree in the 
room beyond We think how delighted the little ones will be in 
the morning when they behold the beautiful tree, gay with its 
gaudy tinsel and bright colored trimmings, and how they will shout 
for joy when they receive the pretty gifts and numerous toys which 
generous old Santa Claus has brought them in answer to the many 
letters he has obtained from his mail box, namely the chimney tops. 

Father proposes roasting apples and Brother suggests popping 
corn, so we decide to pass the remainder of the evening in accord- 
ance with their wishes. Grandma, Aunt Mary and Mother bid us 
good-night as they intend having a confidential chat before retiring 
and we are left to amuse ourselves as we please. Such fun do we 
have ! Roasting apples is a fine pastime, I assure you ! Who 
does not enjoy popping corn on a cold winter's night ? The clock 
strikes twelve, and we look at each other aghast ! Certainly it can 
not be so late ! " Bed time !" says Father abruptly. We must 
bid farewell to the dying embers and climb up stairs to rest and 
dream of the joyous to-morrow. 

Agnes Belle Goldsby. 



2278 The Euterpean. 

g?oetetg latins, 

MARY B. GUDGER. 



— On Friday evening, Nov. 21st, Dr. Clewell and his visitors, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kreider, of Linden Hall Seminary, were made wel- 
come at our Society meeting. The program consisted of a violin 
solo by Miss Lillie Domino, accompanied on the piano by Miss 
Agnes Goldsby ; a Reading, Miss Mattiella Cocke ; a Vocal Solo, 
Miss Corinne Baskin, and an Instrumental Solo, by Miss Eva 
Harris. 

— The following Friday evening there was an election of officers. 
The old officers were all re-elected : 

President — Miss Bess B Sloane. 

Vice President — Miss L. Pauline Sessoms. 

Secretary — Miss Lita Young. 

Critic — Miss Mary Gudger. 

Chaplain — Miss Mattiella Cocke. 

Treasurer — Miss Rhetta Weslosky. 

Librarian — Miss Henrietta Reid. 

— For several years, just about three weeks before Christmas, 
Dr. Clewell has spent a portion of three evenings in reading to the 
girls Dickens' famous story — Marley's Ghost. 

This year the story was read for the benefit of the tenth room 
children, and they invited all the different room company girls to 
be present. The college parlor was crowded each evening with 
girls who eagerly listened to the adventures which befell old 
Scrooge. 

The old pupils of the Academy will doubtless look back on these 
evenings as three of the pleasantest spent in S. F. A. 



lEKijange department. 



FRANCIS POWERS. 



— On account of lack of space it was necessary to omit the ex- 
changes last month. However, we wish to express our great pleas- 
ure at receiving so many during the past three months, and sin- 
cerely hope we may have several more to add to our list. 

— The Doane Owl contains many good articles, the editorials 
being specially fine last month. 



The Euterpean. 2279 

— We hold the Comenian as one of our best exchanges, the arti- 
cle on " The Value of Physical Culture" deserves special notice. 

— The William Woods College Record is a neat little paper. 

— Among our exchanges we find the Pine and Thistle, a paper 
doing excellent work. 

— The Mirror was well named, and reflects to us the happy 
school life at Bethlehem. 

— The Florida Magazine treats mostly of the agricultural indus- 
try, but also contains several interesting stories. 

— From Beverly, Mass., comes the s£gis, which we are more 
than delighted to receive 

— The November number of the Austin College Reveille has 
reached us. The exchange department is fine. 

— We were glad to welcome the Red and White, which tells us 
that we are not the only lovers of outdoor sports. 

Concerning the Juniors. 



Motto —X. A. L. 

Colors — Silver and blue. 

Flower — White rose. 

At the important class meeting held on Thursday, the 21st of 
last month, we decided upon our Class Colors and Flower, our 
Motto having been previously chosen. 

We wish to thank Bishop Rondthaler who so kindly assisted us 
in selecting the motto. 

We Juniors hope that we, like the white rose, may shed sweet- 
ness and fragrance into the lives of those about us, and that we may 
find the silver lining to each cloud which overshadows the blue sky 
of our youth, and, lastly, may we always live in loving fellowship 
with one another, and ever be able to say : " We're friends." 

A. B. G. 



22So The Hesperian. 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Katie M. Kilbuck — Editor-in-chief. 
Sadie M. Rollins— Assistant Editor. 
Adah A. Petway — Literary Editor. 
Florence Moorman — Exchange Editor. 
Louise F. Harper— Business Manager. 



lETritortal department. 

— That a large assortment of books in every highly cultured 
family is necessary has been accepted without a moment of thought. 
Of course, to have a well-rounded education one must be well read, 
yet an abundance of books and constant references to them for in- 
formation on almost all topics threatens to make perception a lost 
art, and by perception we mean all the mental powers, for it in- 
cludes them all. 

We all envy Alexander the Great for having had the great phil- 
osopher, Aristotle, as his tutor, and desire the best of teachers for 
ourselves ! If we could but realize that the best of instructors is 
free to us all, rich and poor, old and young, we would begin at 
once to cultivate quick observation, for often have we heard that 
" Experience is the best teacher." 



— At a recent meeting of the Associated Alumni of the College 
of the City of New York the different classes, following the good 
old custom, told their pet stories. One that found instant favor 
was related of the late George Hardy, head of the English Depart- 
ment. He was addicted to the very pardonable habit of indulging 
in cigars and prime tobacco. Now, as in college anathemas betide 
the man who burns the weed, these "stolen sweets" had to be 
carefully guarded. 



The Hesperian. 2281 

One morning between lecture hours it chanced that the genial 
Prof. Herbermann dropped in, and while he was waxing discursive 
in his own inimitable way, he slyly spied a package of the genuine 
article just sticking out from underneath some layers of marking 
sheets. With a quick sweep of the arm he shoved them aside and 
in pseudo astonishment exclaimed : 

" Quid est hoc?" 

" Hoc est ' quid,' " was the matter-of-fact reply. — N. Y. Times. 



— "The Blue Flower," by Dr. Henry Van Dyke, is composed 
of nine short stories, "The Source," "The Mill." "Spy Rock," 
"Wood Magic," "The Otherwise Man," "A Handful of Clay," 
"The Lost Word" and "The First Christmas Tree" It is to 
the shortest of these three stories, "The Handful of Clay," that 
we wish to call particular attention. 

Dr. Van Dyke tells how a handful of clay, which had high 
thoughts of its own value and wonderful dreams of the great place 
which it was to fill in the world, was taken from the river bank one 
day and carried far away over a rough and stony road. It patiently 
bore the rude handling it was given, as it imagined it was on its 
way to play a great part in the world, and it realized that "the 
path to glory is always rugged." 

The clay was very badly treated, being first stirred, then beaten, 
then whirled swiftly around on a refining wheel, but it consoled 
itself by thinking that something great was coming out of all this 
trouble. Like many a human being, the poor clay built air castles 
to the effect that it would some day be something beautiful — per- 
haps a vase, which would adorn a millionaire's mantel, or a costly 
ornament for a temple, and with ideas like these running in its 
mind we can realize what a disappointment it must have been to 
the clay to find itself moulded into a common flower pot, stiff, red 
and ugly 

Instead of making the best of its lot, and thinking of the good 
and happiness it might bring to those around it, it murmured 
against its unknown maker, saying, like many of us : " Why hast 
thou made me thus?" 

One day the flower pot felt itself lifted from its place in the green 
house and carried into a church. On inquiring from the other 
plants why people looked with such admiration on it, it found out 



2282 The Hesperian. 

that it was carrying the most wonderful flower in the world and 
that the root of that flower was in its heart. 

In the end its wish had come true, but not until the maker of the 
pot saw that it was in the frame of mind to appreciate its station 
did he raise him to higher ranks of life. Finally, realizing the 
superior knowledge of its creator, the clay resigned itself to his 
will and silently thanked him for the privilege of being an ordinary 
earthen vessel. 



A Glance at Recent Fiction. 



Our reading publi care, at present, enjoying some very interesting 
books. Owen Wister's " The Virginian " heads the list of popu- 
larity, while " Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch," by Alice Hegan, 
holds the second place. 

Gilbert Parker's latest work, " Donovan Pasha," is now on sale. 
Its scene is laid in Northern Africa, and if it " has the run " which 
" The Right of Way " had, their author's road to fame will be well 
paved. ""N 

"Miss Petticoats," by Dwight Tilton, is a very entertaining story. 

"The Hound of the Baskervilles," by A. Conan Doyle, is a 
book that nolds your interest from cover to cover. It is a typical 
*' detective story," every page of which "tastes like more." 

We all like Richard Harding Davis because he has given us 
"Soldiers of Fortune," and will, therefore, be glad to hear that he 
has another novel on the market Its title is : " Captain Macklin." 
The scene of this work is laid in Central America. The reader can 
see that the same person wrote both books. The striking differ- 
ence between them is in their heroes. The hero of " Soldiers of 
Fortune" gave up everything for his sweetheart, to whom he was 
wholly and solely devoted ; while Captain Macklin, in the book of 
that name, is a directly opposite sort of man. He is of an adven- 
turous disposition ; love, therefore, plays the minor part in his 
career. Davis' style is pleasing, and "Captain Macklin" is well 
worth reading. 

" The Red Anvil " is by Charles Reginald Sherlock, the author 
of " Your Uncle Lew." It is interesting in a way, since it touches 
upon facts in our history about which very little has been written ; 
but on the other hand there are parts of it which make it unpleas- 



The Hesperian. 2283 

ant. It tells of the workings of the " Underground Railway" and 
the " Grapevine Telegreph " as the act of secretly getting negroes 
from place to place was called. In it Lyme Disbrowe, a noted abo- 
litionist, is a sort of "Uncle Lew" or " Eben Holden." His 
brother's name is Rev. Abe Disbrowe, and his son's was Dr. Win- 
field Scott Disbrowe. Bessie Malcom was Winfield's sweetheart. 
She generously paid $1200 to free Dick Richards, a runaway slave, 
who falls in love with his benefactress, and this makes the unpleas- 
ant part of the work. Lyme Disbrowe helped Cherry LeMoyne, a 
mulatto girl to escape. Later she was found murdered, and Lyme 
Disbrowe was accused of having done this act ; was found guilty, 
condemned, and upon being hanged Bessie Malcom proved him 
innocent and Dick Richards guilty. The latter would have taken 
the'former's place on the gallows, but, in riding to that place, was 
thrown from his horse and killed. It would make a good play if 
parts of it were altered sufficiently. 

Admirers of Mrs. Augusta Evans Wilson will rejoice with me 
that she has written another novel, after a silence of 16 years. Its 
title is "The Speckled Bird." Like her other works, " Beulah," 
"St. Elmo," and " Infelice," the heroine is a queer, moody girl, 
who falls in love with a man, and, after numberless trials, her "affairs 
of the heart" are straightened out. The characters in "The 
Speckled Bird" are : Mrs. Maurice, an aristocratic old lady; her 
husband, General Egbert Maurice, who was killed near Richmond, 
in the Civil War. Their only daughter, Marcia, broke her mother's 
heart by marrying a Federal judge, Allison Kent. His daughter, 
Egla, was the Speckled Bird. The hero of the story is Noel Her- 
riot, whom Egla afterward married. 

Shortly before Paul Leicester Ford died he wrote a charming 
little story, "Wanted — A Chaperon," which appeared in an issue 
of the Century Magazine. It has now been published in book 
form. It is very attractively "gotten up," prettily bound, and illus- 
trated by Christy. 

These, and other books of the day, are on sale at present, and by 
reading the best of them many hours during the coming holidays 
may be spent profitably and enjoyably. 



— Viola Saunders certainly had her share of the vaccination, but 
we are glad to see that she pulled through all O K, if she does look 
rather " pale." 



2284 The Hesperian. 

ISKljaiige department. 



— It is with great pleasure that we acknowledge the receipt of 
the following exchanges since our last issue of The Academy : 
" Purple and Green," Murfreesboro, Tenn. ; "The Alpha," Fred- 
erick, Md-, and "The Comtnian," Bethlehem, Pa. 

— The "Purple and Green" is read with interest and heartily 
welcomed, semi-monthly. The issues of this paper for October 5th 
and November 18th were filled with baseball notes mostly. The 
article, entitled " Queen Elizabeth and Florence Nightingale," 
deserves mention, however. 

— In "The Alpha" we find quite a number of interesting articles, 
Among these is " The Story of the Iliad" and "The Church and 
Mosque of St. Sophia," both cleverly written articles. We were 
very glad to learn of the origin and manufacture of buttons in the 
article entitled " Buttons." 

— "The Comenian " contains several short articles and stories. 
The German story, " Nurnberger Erinnerungen," is specially in- 
teresting. 

— As an instance of President Hadley's aptness in meeting every 
situation, or replying to every pertinent or impertinent question^ 
the following story is told. 

At a reception given for him by an old friend some 500 miles 
from New Haven, one individual with a better memory than tact 
asked him what he thought of the recent baseball game. As Yale 
had met with a disastrous defeat, the subject might be called un- 
pleasant. Without hesitation President Hadley said : 

" There was a boy living in a village whose uncle died. The 
next day a man driving along the road was surprised to find the 
boy working in a field. Thinking this did not show proper respect 
to the dead uncle, he called the lad to him and said: 'Johnny, 
didn't you know your uncle was dead ?" 

"Johnny slowly approached and drawled out : 

" ' Yes, I know it — I have cried.' " — N. Y, Times. 

— Lord Charles was often troubled by importunate acquaintances, 
who begged for some of his father's (the Duke of Wellington) hair. 
On such occasions he said to an old servant, whose hair was like 
the duke's : "Sit down, John. I must cut off another lock." 



The Hesperian. 2285 

Hocals. 



— We met at the usual hour in our Society Hall, Nov. 28th, and 
to our great surprise the officers had planned an " Evening of Rag 
Time " for us. The entire evening was carried out in rag time 
style. The programmes were pieces of rags, decorated with deckle 
edges, and the numbers written out in full on them We were 
glad to have Dr. Clewell and several of the teachers with us on 
that evening. 

— We have been giving Literature a great deal of attention this 
year, and it is our desire to continue to do so. Several evenings 
ago we took up the study of the " Elizabethan Age." A number 
of well-written papers were read on that subject during the evening, 
and the meeting proved to be very interesting and beneficial. 

— A number of Hesperians will visit their homes during the 
Christmas recess. 

— Blanche Nicholson was called home several days ago by the 
illness of her brother. We hope that he will soon recover from his 
illness, and she will soon be able to be with us again. 

— We are sorry to hear of Mrs. Clewell's illness, and earnest^ 
hope that before many days have passed she will be able to be with 
us again. 

— Two of our members, Misses Pattie and Pescud Chisman, 
have been home for quite a while on account of Pattie' s illness. We 
have missed them very much, and will be more than glad to see 
them back in January. 

— A brilliant Hesperian is thinking of composing a history of 
the United States. One of her items is that Jamestown was settled 
in 1900. 

— Another's tastes run in another direction, but her statements 
are equally as correct as her friend's. One of them is " a young 
youth " 

— A Senior distinguished herself in History class by stating that 
"Romulus built the walls of Thebes." 



Mrs. Boaster — Henry and I went to the theatre last night. We 
had a box." 

Mrs. Blunt — Chocolates, weren't they? I saw you in the gal- 
ery eating something. 



2286 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston- - alem. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2287 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 

By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
Pritited by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say.- 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about your people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W. Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says: " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLBR & SON, 

WIRSTOW-SALEM, N. C. 



2288 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL. 

We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line of 

-i-JSTOTIONS,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-SALEM, ji". C. 



The Academy. 228 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

. # 

EOSENBACHEES 
DEPARTMENT STOEES. 



2290 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

oak mr>GE, n. a 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H HOLT, Prins. 



When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships prizes and medals. Gymniisium. Healthful out door 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January loth, 189J. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham School-1902-03 

Located on the Ashsville Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office, Ashevil!e, N. C 



The Academy. 2291 






WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLITMBEB, 

TINNEK, 
COKNICE ¥OEKEE. 



§0UTf)GRn RAILWAY. 



The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, P. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N. C C.P.& T.A.,Ashevlile,N.C 

PRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARDWICK, 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D C. 



2292 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

IP A LL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates front Classical Course enter State University without examination. 
Situations easily secuied by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Bookkeeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogue. 

JAS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



YOU 

WANT 



THAT'S 



THE 
GO? 



IF 

SO 

SEE 

US 



"WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CT02STH3S. 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best <hat the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 



At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 



Reference Salem Femi'e Academy 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C, January, 1903. No. 226. 

Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College ; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



fEtritorial. 



— The announcement of the liberal gift by our former pupil, 
Mrs. Harriet Straw Whitesides, will be welcome news to all of the 
friends of the school. The plea of our Governor, the call of the 
friends of the school, the liberal response of the home people, the 
success of the efforts of the Alumnae Association, all these things 
point to the success of the endowment move in the new century 
which is now opening. As one friend has said, the money which 
is given to the Academy will be administered so as to produce 
more good than would be the case in almost any other school. Let 
the good work go on ! 



— Our friends of the Class of 1901 are to.be congratulated on 
the successful carrying out of their plans. The beautiful picture 
will be a means of great good in the school. Not only is it a valu- 
able addition as a work of art, not only will it be a constant re- 
minder of the dear young friends who have returned to their homes 
and are entering upon the realities of life, but it will be a "sermon" 
in itself, inviting the thoughts of those who study it to higher and 
nobler things. 



2294 The Academy. 

— The "quiz" list and examination notice will be found of 
great value to pupils. If this number of The Academy is pre- 
served it will be of service in guiding and shaping the work so as 
to always be ready for the dates as they come and go. The par- 
ticular form of reviews as established this year has been eminently 
successful, The school has never been more thoroughly in earnest, 
and we may add more successful than is the case this year. All 
are to be congratulated on the success of this the first year in the 
second century of the history. 



— Our locals and other matter which had been'prepared have 
been crowded out- As the locals are not of a nature that they will 
be less interesting next month we will reserve them for that time. 



— It is a matter of congratulation that we have been able to 
secure a full supply of coal in the midst of this difficult winter. At 
one time we decided to close the class rooms for a time to econo- 
mize the supply, but a fortunate purchase removed thej risk of 
trouble, and now the supply of coal within the school is sufficient 
to last till the balmy days of Spring arrive. 



— We have received many cordial letters congratulating us on 
the improved appearance of The Academy. It gives us pleasure 
to know that our friends are pleased, and we believe that the in- 
creased interest will stimulate those in charge of the paper to strive 
for still better things. 



— Perhaps some of our friends may desire an inexpensive 
binder to hold The Academy in its present magazine form. If 
such is the case we will be pleased to arrange to furnish this con- 
venience The paper becomes valuable as time passes as a refer- 
ence, in fact, it is a history of the school, and those who attend at 
this time should preserve the papers for future years. Many names 
will thus be preserved which otherwise will be lost. 



The Academy 2295 

1,000 for the School. 



In the year 1900 we were in the city of Chattanooga on a 
pleasant summer's day, and, after having visited a number of 
friends and inspected the points of interest in and around the city, 
we called about dusk at the home of an elderly lady. This friend 
had been a pupil many years ago in the Academy, and we had a 
pleasant chat with her before we returned to the hotel and took 
the train for our North Carolina home. 

A few days ago we received the following letter from this 
same lady : — 

"To the Trustees of Salem Female Academy, 

"Salem, N C. : 
' ' Dear Sirs ": — 

" I had intended to leave a legacy of a thousand dollars 
to the dear old Academy in which much of my youthful schooling 
was received, but it now seems best for me to give it to-day. In- 
closed is New York draft for that amount, 

"With grateful memories of Salem Female Academy, and 
hopes for its future usefulness, I am, 

" Very truly, 
"Harriet Straw Whitesides." 

Mrs. Whiteside was in the school between 1830 and 1840, for 
about five years, the Rev. Mr. Jacobson being Principal. 

Truly, it was a pleasant surprise to open this letter and read 
its contents. The good work for the future of the school is going 
forward, and when friends become more and more impressed with 
the immense amount of good which the Salem School can accom- 
plish with even a modest endowment, there is no doubt but that 
the example of Mrs. Whiteside will be followed by others. 

In the name of the Trustees, of the School itself and of the 
many outside friends we return thanks to this liberal friend, and we 
can assure her that at no more opportune time could a gift have 
been given than just at this time, at the beginning of the second 
century of the history of Salem Female Academy. Long after the 
kind donor has ceased to be active in the affairs of this busy world 
her gift will continue to perform its task of doing good in the im- 
provement and advancement of the young people who seek the 
Salem school for the improvement of the mind, the development 
of the body, and the deepening of the religious life. 



2296 The Academy. 

"Christ in the Temple." 



MEMORIAL OF THE CLASS OF 1901. 



The beautiful picture of the Bible scene, depicted by Hoff- 
mann's world famous painting, has arrived. It is the gift of the 
Class of 1901 to their Alma Mater. When these young ladies said 
farewell to the school they decided to leave a memorial which 
would greet the members of the class whenever one or another 
should return. They decided to have a copy made of the famous 
painting, which has as one of its features an ideal child face, and it 
may be said to have the most perfect youthful face ever placed on 
canvass. The original painting is in the Dresden gallery. The 
boy Jesus, at twelve years, went up to Jerusalem. When his par- 
ents returned they discovered that the child was not in the com- 
pany. Returning to the city they found him in the temple, in the 
midst of the doctors, asking and answering questions. The paint- 
ingirepresents the child Jesus in the center of the group. On the 
one side is a turbaned doctor of the law, with an intent and thought- 
ful expression on his face. On the other is another learned man, 
with extended hand, asking a question, while a third is seated on 
a chair with an expression of amazement at the wonderful wisdom 
of twelve years. In the background is a white-haired rabbi, with 
a sneer upon his lip. distrustful of the entire matter. Each face 
has its own peculiar characteristic, and the entire group is most 
striking. 

The face of the child Jesus is the strong point in the picture. 
The clear, pure, earnest face, the earnestness of the beautiful eyes, 
the hint of a halo about the head, the white garment in which he 
is clad, all these things make the heart of the one looking upon the 
picture glow with a desire for better things. 

There is no doubt but that this picture will be a living sermon 
to the many young people within the school, and will be like a 
gentle voice exhorting them to better things. 

The history of the manner in which the picture was secured is 
interesting. The services of a well known artist were secured 
through the aid of friends in Saxony. The artist went to Dresden, 
and copied the picture directly from the original. The size is about 
4 X 5/^ f eet - The painting of the picture required three months. 
When completed it was securely packed in a metal case, and this 



The Academy. 2297 

in its turn placed in a heavy wooden box. Thus it began its long 
journey of five thousand miles It at last arrived in New York, 
and there some timt was consumed in the red tape of the Custom 
House. Finally it reached Salem, and when unpacked it was 
found to be without a scratch or blemish oi any kind. The Class 
of 1901 is to be congratulated on the successful outcome of this 
effort, and our community is to be congratulated in receiving into 
its midst so faithful a copy of one of the great masterpieces of the 
world. 

All the money paid by the class had been consumed in the 
expenses connected with securing the painting and more, too. 
The members residing in the school and in the town decided that 
so handsome a picture should have a handsome frame. In order 
to secure this a supper was given in class rooms "C" and "D" 
some days ago, and cleared some thirty dollars. An appeal was 
made to the members of the class to add to their original gifts, and 
responses are being received, su that the girls will ba enabled to 
purchase a frame worthy of the beautiful picture. When placed 
in position in some prominent place in the school this beautiful 
memorial will not only be a thing of beauty in itself considered, 
but it will again and again bring to the mind the names and faces 
of the esteemed members of the Class of 1901. 



Christmas in the School. 



The happy Christmas season brought with it its full quota of 
joy and of rejoicing. The rooms were profusely decorated, and the 
tables fairly groaned under the weight of the gifts. The girls had 
decided some time before Christmas to discourage the giving of 
presents among the pupils. Still the boxes came into the School 
so filled with the affectionate remembrances of distant friends that 
the handsome things displayed seemed to be not a whit less than in 
years gone by. 

The Church decorations were very beautiful, and the services 
just as happy as ever, from the " childrens' meeting " on Christmas 
eve, to the solemn midnight watch meeting at the close of the year. 

About half the School remained in the institution, so that the 
family was large, even though many went home to spend the holi- 
days in the home circle. 



2298 The Academy. 

The Principal's house was open to visitors on Christmas day 
when Dr. and Mrs. Clewell received the faculty and pupils. On 
New Year's day the School was again entertained and both occa- 
sions were very enjoyable. 

It would hardly be fair to the Christmas season to omit men- 
tion of the Tenth Room. Christmas was enjoyed all through the 
building. But to find unalloyed pleasure ; to find it in bountiful 
measure, heaped up and running over, it was necessary to go to 
this company of a dozen little misses, with their dolls and toys, 
their cakes and sugar plums, their boxes and their Christmas bun- 
dles. It was a veritable headquarters of old Santa Claus. 

Thus the happy old season came and went. And when we look 
back to it we find that after all is said that which stands out in the 
clearest and purest light is the beautiful spiritual atmosphere which 
surrounded the season. Many prayers were offered before the 
approach of the Christmas season which had as their theme the 
desire to see the higher and nobler things in connection with this 
happy week. These prayers vvere answered, and the spiritual 
features of the Christmas tide were the chief enjoyments, and their 
memories will linger long as a sweet fragrance. 



— We sympathize greatly with a sister school, St. Mary's, of 
Raleigh, N. C, whose Infirmary Building was destroyed by fire 
late in the afternoon of January 9th. It seems a burning match 
had been thrown out of a window, after lighting the gas, and falling 
on some dry leaves, soon burst into a flame, and in thirty minutes 
the building was gone. By the heroic efforts of the students of the 
A. & M. College and the Raleigh Fire Department the main build- 
ing was saved Six large oak trees burned like tinder. The in- 
mates of the infirmary were quickly gotten out, and the actual loss 
of personal property was not very great. 



— The "Daily State Gazette," of Trenton, N. J., contains a 
four-column report of a lecture delivered by Prof. Skilton on "What 
music is, its origin, sources, form and content." It says: " Every 
word of Prof. Skilton was listened to with the closest attention, and 
his auditors without an exception were delighted and impressed by 
his effort. 



The Academy. 2299 



FROM ALUMNvE AND OTHER FRIENDS. 



All communications for this Department should be addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
from former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



" I hope dear Academy it is not too late to congratulate j^ou 
on your beautiful new dress, to symbolize white and gold. You 
have blessed thousands by sending them out : ' White as snow ' 
and as 'good as gold.' I would have written my congratulations 
before this but the 82 winters that have passed over my head have 
left me feeble of late. Wishing you a happy and prosperous year, 
I am, an old pupil of the year 183^. 

" Ann Sturdivant (Ann Myers). 

" 207 N. Broad St., Charlotte, N. C. , Jan 12, 1903." 

"Again the Christmas season is here and again more than 
ever my heart turns toward Salem and I think of the happy, never 
to be forgotten Christmas I spent there, and of you who were so 
good to me. I am sure your Christmas will be very happy — for 
how could it be otherwise when you bring so much happiness into 
the lives of others. 

" I want to take this opportunity of congratulating you upon 
The Academy. It is a most excellent paper, and I am sure it will 
be a great success. It is indeed a pleasure to read the paper, so 
cleverly gotlen up each month. 

" Please remember me to Miss Lehman and the Bishop. 

" With a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year for you 
and all your household, I am, 

"Your friend always, 

" Geraldine Dessau. 
" Christmas Eve." 

" Will you please send me a Catalogue of Salem Academy and 
College ? One of the pupils of Ayden College where I now teach, 
thinks of going away to school next fall, and has expressed a desire 
to see one of your Catalogues. 

" Thanking you in advance, and with best wishes for yourself 
and teachers, I am, 

" Very sincerely yours, 

"Bertha Dawson." 



2^00 



The Academy. 



List of " Quiz " Dates. 



For the convenience of pupils and teachers we give the "quiz" 
dates for the second term of the school-year. The time in each 
case is one hour. 

January Plan. 

Senior Class. — Trigonometry, Friday, January 28, 3d hour. 

Mythology, Tuesday, January 20, 4th hour. 

Long. Eng. Poems, Wed'day, Jan. 21, 2d hour. 

Psychology, Monday, January 19, 4th hour. 
Junior Class. — Algebra, Tuesday, January 20, 4th hour. 

Chemistry, Wednesday, January 21, 4th hour. 

Latin, Thursday, January 22, 1st hour. 
Sophomore Class — Algebra, Wednesday, January 21, 1st hour. 

History, Monday, January 19, 3d hour. 

Latin, Tuesday, January 20, 2d hour. 
Freshman Class. — Algebra, Wednesday, January 21, 1st hour. 

Science, Thursday, January 22d, 5th hour. 

Latin, Tuesday, January 20, 3d hour. 
D Class. — Arithmetic, Tuesday, January 20th, 1st hour. 

Geography, Wednesday, Jan. 21st, 2d hour. 

Latin, Thursday, January 22d, 4th hour. 
C Class. — Geography, Monday, January 19th, 2d hour. 

Arithmetic, Tuesday, January 20, 2d hour. 

History, Thursday, January 22, 4th hour. 
B Class. — Geography, Monday, January 19, 2d hour. 

Arithmetic, Tuesday, January 20, 1st hour. 

History, Wednesday, January 21, 2d hour. 
A Class. — Geography, Friday, January 23, 1st hour. 

Arithmetic, Tuesday, January 20, 3d hour. 

History, Thursday, January 22, 2d hour. 



February Plan. . 

Senior Class. — . Latin, Tuesday, February 17, 1st hour. 

General History, Wednesday, February 18, 
4th hour. 

Chemistry, Thursday, February 19, 3d hour. 
Junior Class. — . Geometry, Monday, February 16, 2d hour. 

Hist, of Lit., Tuesday, February 17, 3d hour. 

History, Friday, February 20, 5th hour. 



The Academy. 



2301 



Sophomore Class. 



Freshman Class.- 



Class D. 



Class C. — 



Class B. — 



Class A. — 



-Science, Tuesday, February 17, 4th hour. 
Geometry, Thursday, February 19, 1st hour. 
Astronomy, Friday, February 20, 2d hour. 
Grammar, Monday, February 16, 2d hour. 
History, Tuesday, February 17, 2d hour. 
Geometry, Thursday, February 19, 1st hour. 
Algebra, Monday, February 16, 4th hour. 
Grammar, Tuesday, February 17, 3d hour. 
History, Thursday, February 19, 5th hour. 
Grammar, Tuesday, February 17, 3d hour. 
Science, Thursday, February 19, 5th hour. 
Spelling, Friday, February 20, 5th hour 
Grammar, Monday, February 16, 5th hour. 
Spelling, Tuesday, February 17, 2d hour. 
Science, Thursday, February 19, 5th hour. 
Spelling, Tuesday, February 17, 2d hour. 
Grammar, Wednesday, February 18, 2d hour. 
Science, Thursday, February 19, 5th hour. 



March Plan. 



Senior Class. — . Psychology, Monday, March 16, 4th hour. 

Mythology, Tuesday, March 17, 4th hour. 

L. E. P., Wednesday, March 18, 2d hour. 

Trigonometry, Friday, March 20, 3d hour. 
Junior Class. — . Algebra, Tuesday, March 17, 4th hour. 

Chemistry, Wednesday, March 18, 4th hour. 

Latin, Thursday, March 19, 1st hour. 
Sophomore Class. — Algebra, Monday, March 16, 1st hour. 

History, Wednesday, March 18, 4th hour. 

Latin, Thursday, March 19, 2d hour. 
Freshman Class. — Latin, Tuesday, March 17, 3d hour. 

Algebra, Wednesday, March 18, 1st hour. 

Science, Thursday, March 19, 5th hour. 
D Class. — . . Arithmetic, Tuesday, March 17, 1st hour. 

Geography, Wednesday, March 18, 2d hour. 

Latin, Thursday, March 19, 4th hour. 
C Class. — . . Geography, Monday, March 16, 2d hour. 

Arithmetic, Tuesday, March 17, 2d hour. 

History, Thursday, March 19, 4th hour. 



2302 The Academy. 

B Class. — . . Geography, Monday, March 16, 2d hour. 

Arithmetic, Tuesday, March 17, 4th hour. 

History, Wednesday, March 18, 2d hour. 
A Class. — . . Arithmetic, Tuesday, March 17. 3d hour. 

History, Thursday, March 19, 2d hour. 

Geography, Friday, March 20, 1st hour. 

April Plan. 

Senior Class. — . History, Wednesday, April 22, 4th hour. 

Latin, Thursday, April 23, 1st hour. 

Chemistry, Friday, April 24, 2d hour. 
Junior Class. — . Geometry, Monday, April 20, 2nd hour. 

Hist, of Lit., Tuesday, April 21, 3d hour. 

History, Friday, April 24, 5th hour. 
Sophomore Class. — Science, Tuesday, April 2r, 4th hour. 

Geometry, Thursday, April 23, 1st hour. 

Astronomy, Friday, April 24, 2d hour. 
Freshman Class. — Geometry, Thursday, April 23 1st hour. 

History, Thursday, April 23, 2d hour. 

Grammar, Monday, April 27, 2d hour. 
D Class. — . History, Thursday, April 23, 5th hour. 

Grammar, Friday, April 24, 4th hour. 

Algebra, Monday, April 27, 4th hour. 
C Class. — . Science, Thursday, April 23, 5th hour. 

Grammar, Friday, April 24, 4th hour. 

Spelling, Friday, April 24, 5th hour. 
B Class. — . . Spelling, Thursday, April 23, 4th hour. 

Science, Thursday, April 23, 5th hour. 

Grammar, Friday, April 24, 4th hour. 
A Class. — . . Grammar, Wednesday, April 22, 2d hour. 

Science, Thursday, April 23, 5th hour. 

Spelling, Friday, April 24, 4th hour. 

The final examinations for class promotion will be held Thurs- 
day, May 14, Friday, May 15, Tuesday, May 19 and Thursday, 
May 21. These final examinations will be based upon the work of 
the full school year. 



The Academy. 2303 



The Junior Naturalist Club. 



Our "Junior Naturalist Club" is doing a quiet but very effec- 
tive work in training the quick eyes and ears of our younger pupils 
to observe and search out for themselves. Papers, copies of "The 
Junior Naturalist Monthly," are sent us regularly by the Bureau 
of Nature Study at Cornell ; each one contains a bright and in- 
structive talk about birds, insects, trees, plants, whatever is in 
season, together with a quiz paper to be answered by the pupils as 
nearly as they can. 

In our turn each member is required to write a monthly letter 
as her dues to "Uncle John" at Cornell, containing any thing 
of interest which she has seen or searched out for herself. Each 
girl has a " Science Note Book, ' ' in which she puts down her items, 
and some of these note books would be creditable to much older 
pupils. 

We give a kindly and encouraging letter from " Uncle John," 
one of his many ways of putting interest and heart into the Nature 
Work It reads as follows : 
" Dear Teacher : 

"The dues for the past month were very satisfactory. I 
note with pleasure that the children are using their eyes and are 
really seeing what lies about them. I wonder whether they have 
read the story, 'Eyes or No Eyes." It is found in many of the 
school readers. Tell them Uncle John is glad he can think of 
them as ' eyes.' 

" The ' unseen hand ' is worth more than I can say. Children, 
like grown people, can be led unwittingly to depths of thought 
whose value is beyond estimation in this world. Thank you in 
the name of the children for the help and inspiration you are giving 
them. 

" With best wishes to both club and teacher, I am, 
" Cordially, yours, 

"John W. Spencer." 



2304 The Academy. 

Personal Sterns. 

— We are sorry to hear of the bereavement which has come to one 
of our Alumna, Mary Miller, in the death of her husband, Mr. Leslie 
Southerland, of Goldsboro. We quote from the Goldsboro Argus : 

"Mr. Sutherland was married in 1896, to Miss Mary Miller, sec- 
ond daughter of Dr J. F Miller. Few are possessed of the sunny 
dispositi n and golden-hearted characteristics of Leslie Southerland, 
and he will be sadly missed by us all, but especially in the home that 
has lost the charm of his personality and the comfort of his gentle, 
kindly words and living ministrations, and in his godly life he leaves 
them the rich heritage of a blessed memory." 

— We also note with deep regret the death of Dr. McGregor, of 
Waco, Texas, father of Almeida McGregor, now Mrs. H. S. McLen- 
don, of Waco. Dr. McGregor was a native North Carolinian, of 
that strong, intellectual Scotch type that has done so much for our 
State as well as for others. He went to Texas in 1852, and began the 
practice of medicine in Austin Co., was one s of the pioneer physi- 
cians of the Line Star State, and had a reputation that extended over 
that whole large State. In 1873 ne removed to Waco, where he has- 
resided ever since. He died at the age of 78 years, after an illness 
of several months. 

— The death angel Azrael seems to be gathering in his harvest 
all over the country. On Dec. 12th Mrs. VV . T. Gray, a young, 
happy wife and mother was called away. It seems but a short time 
since as Ada Dodson she went in and out among us in her modest, 
gentle way, beloved of all, and yet she too has gone into the un- 
created brightness of the glorious, heavenly land, leaving an aching 
void in the hearts of husband, two children and a large circle of 
friends 

— We were very pleased to hear, through Miss M. E Vogler. of 
Eliza Barr, a faithful pupil of 1865. She is now Mrs. S. R. Oglesby, 
of Hope, Ark. Her oldest daughter is a widow, and she has besides 
a son of 2r years old and twin boys of 14 

— We just received a paper, the Ocala, Fla . " Weekly," dated 
July 13th, 1902, which gives the sad intelligence of the death of a 
beloved pupil of years ago, Mrs Halton Howard (Mollie Gibson), of 
Grahamville, Fla. She-was 38 years old, and leaves a devoted hus- 
band and five children, the oldest, a young man of 19, in the Atlanta 
School of Technicology, and the youngest, William, only 2 years 
old. Our deepest sympathies are with them in this great bereavement. 

— Miss Caroline Leinbach is teaching in the Chase Conservatory 
of Music at Columbus, Ga 



The Academy. 2305 



Death of Mrs. H. A. Pfohl. 



Ic is seldom that a whole community is moved to its tenderest 
depths of sympathy as ours was by the death of Mrs. H. A. Pfohl 
(Agnes Fogle), daughter of the late C. H. Fogle, and wife of Mr. 
Herbert A. Pfohl, son of our own Mr. C. B. Pfohl, so well known 
to all Academy girls. 

She had been ill for several months, yet still we hoped her 
youth and strength would triumph in the end, but it was not so to 
be, and she gently fell asleep in Jesus on Wednesday afternoon, 
January 21st. To be called away in the bloom of young woman- 
hood from an ideally happy home, with 3 little children so sorely 
needing the gently guiding mother-hand, seems to be one of the 
hard, dark problems of this pilgrim land of ours. 

.It looks so inexplicable and mysterious but some time, when 
the mists have rolled away, in the Better Land, in the beautiful 
country beyond the river, we shall know that lengthened breath is 
not always the sweetest boon God gives to his beloved. Till then 
we can only hope and trust, but there, up there, we'll understand. 

E. L. 



Jftarrietr. 



Cross — Warren. — On Dec. 20th, 1902, in Pensacola, Fla., Mr. Wil- 
liam Arthur Warren, of Toronto Can., to Miss Harriet Cross. 

Millner — Richardson. - On Dec. 23d, 1902, Mr. Wallace Bell 
Millner to Miss Margaret Payne Richardson. 

Shore — Flynt.— On Dec. 24, 1902, Mr. Irwin Shore to Miss Maud 
Flynt. 

Gibson — Adams. — On Dec. 31, 1902, at McColl, N. C, Mr. Noah 
Francis Gibson to Miss Hattye Malloy Adams. 

Crenshaw— Ollinger. — On Jan- 1st, 1903, in Atlanta, Ga., Dr. Han- 
sell Crenshaw to Miss Carolyn Ollinger. 

Dunklin — Hairston.— &n Jan. 5, 1903, in Greensboro, N. C, Mr. 
Frank Dunklin, of Christiansburg, Va., to Miss Lettie L. Hairston, of 
Walnut Cove, N. C. 

Cromer — Crutchfield. — On Jan. 7th, 1903, Mr. Charles DeWitt 
Cromer to Miss Carrie Lindsay Crutchfield, both of Winston, N. C. 

Mickey — Keith. — On Jan. 8th, 1903, Mr. Robert Mickey, now of 
Northumberland, Pa., to Miss Margaret Keith, of Winston, N. C. 

Moore— Williams.— On Jan. 14, 1903, in Christ Church, Newberne, 
N. C, Mr. Bemjamin Eugene Moore to Miss Mattir Belo Williams. 



Jitetr. 



Pfohl. — On Jan. 21, 1903, at her residence in Salem, N. C, Mrs. Her- 
bert A. Pfohl (Agnes Fogle). 



2306 The Euterpean. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 

L. Pauline Sessoms— Editor-in-chief. 
Mary B. Gudger — Assistant Editor. 
Frances Powers— Exchange Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby— Literary Editor. 
Corinne Baskin— Business Manager. 



lEMtorial. 



— To each and every member and to all who are interested in 
our Society we extend a hearty New Year's greeting. In review- 
ing our last term, we find that our work was immensely successful. 
The members seemed to take a lively interest in each meeting, and 
the enthusiasm now abroad bids fair to accomplish more than ever 
before during the present year. 



-Letters from old members will be cordially welcomed. 



— Attention is called to the article on "The Coal Situation " 
in this number. The question is a serious one and affects the 
whole country. The coal famine is causing and probably will 
continue to be the cause of many deaths all over the United States. 
While many schools are being closed on account of lack of fuel, it 
is with thankfulness and a great sense of relief we are able to say 
that with our present supply of one hundred tons of coal we hope 
to be carried through the season without feeling any discomfort. 



The Euterpean. 2307 

Our Country as It is Today. 



If our colonial forefathers could look down upon our country 
as it is today, how many of them would recognize the land of their 
nativity ! In their time America was in her infancy, struggling for 
mere existence. She was regarded rather contemptuously by the 
great powers of the world, and looked upon by them as an object 
of insignificance. Soon, however, in the Revolutionary War, she 
succeeded in proving to England and the other nations her capa- 
bility of standing alone. 

The War of 1812 showed her ability to hold her own on the 
sea, and made her realize the absolute necessity of possessing a 
strong marine force. This marks the real beginning of our navy, 
and from that day forth it has increased in power and strength 
until it is now one of the finest in the world, which fact was most 
gloriously shown in the late trouble with Spain. 

Considering the youth of our country its growth has been 
marvellous ; while we do not mean to boast, it is natural that we 
should take pride in the realization that we are an acknowledged 
and highly esteemed power over all the world. 



The Coal Situation. 



AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY. 



The coal strike has brought about one of the most deplorable 
conditions which has ever existed throughout the whole United 
States, for fuel is almost if not quite as essential to man as the air 
he breathes or the light of day by which he labors. 

Of course, we are acquainted with the primary causes which 
led to this awful situation, and we shall merely glance at the disa- 
greements which arose between the coal barons and their em- 
ployees. 

In the first place the members of the Miners' Union demanded 
recognition of their Union and requested the coal operators to 
raise their wages. The latter refused to grant their petition ; there- 
upon the miners declared that they would not lift a finger toward 
continuing their work, and, furthermore, that they would permit 
no other laborers to fill their positions. 



2308 The Euterpean. 

The wealthy mine owners did not believe that the Union had 
the power to enforce the threat. In this they were sadly disap- 
pointed. The miners, more than a hundred thousand strong, kept 
any considerable number of workmen from entering the coal 
region. 

One little instance shows us how members of the Union drove 
out Non-union influences. A physician was travelling on horse- 
back one morning when suddenly he perceived that one of his 
horse's shoes was loose. He drew rein at a blacksmith's shop, 
and requested the smith to attend to the needs of his limping 
beast. The sturdy workman examined the shoe and shook his 
head : "I can't do it," he said, "that shoe was not made by a 
union man." The good doctor was forced to continue his journey, 
his horse still lame. He met with the same ill-fortune, four suc- 
cessive times, but at last he discovered a smith who was not a 
member of the Union and the suffering animal was relieved. 

America sent a large supply of coal to England a few years 
ago, and was obliged to reclaim her exports because her own peo- 
ple were in such want. 

The strike continued until Thanksgiving, when the President 
felt that it was absolutely necessary to interfere in the matter, and 
at length the coal barons and strikers agreed to submit the case to 
arbitration and to abide by the result. Alas ! it was too late to 
make up the deficiency in the supply of coal. 

In some parts of the country churches have been closed and 
notices fastened against the walls which announce that no service 
is to be held on such and such a day because the pastor has not 
been able to secure a sufficient amount of fuel to warm the sanc- 
tuary. The doors of numerous factories have been locked and the 
hands thrown out of work for the time being because it is impos- 
ible to obtain coal. 

In several cities families have migrated to the hotels for the 
winter as the family purse is not full enough to supply the home 
with fuel during the cold season. Public schools have been sus- 
pended in various parts of the country on account of the fearful 
strike. Think of the millions of boys and girls who are passing 
the time in comparative idleness and of the teachers who are losing 
their salaries because it is impossible to heat the school-room ! 
This fact is most strikingly brought home to us in the case of one 
of our sister institutions in Pennsylvania. We are indeed thankful 



The Euterpean. 2309 

to say that our own college has not suffered from want of fuel, and 
as we have a quantity of coal we expect to keep warm until we 
again welcome the glad spring-time. 



A Lullaby. 



One by one the stars appear 
In the evening skies, 
As they twinkle far and near, 
My baby, close thine eyes. 

Dream of flow' ring meadows fair; 
Of hills all white with snow ; 
Of dales where the maiden-hair 
And yellow cowslips grow. 

Dream of the foaming sea 
Where merry wavelets play, 
And the sands of the lea 
Are kissed by the silver spray. 

Dream of roses bathed in dew, 
Of stately lilies proud and tall, 
Of violets with eyes of blue 
Which bloom by the cottage wall. 

Dream of birdies, little one, 
Snug in their warm nest, 
Dream of the glorious sun, 
Which comes at morn's behest. 

Dream, my child, slumber and sleep, 
While the stars twinkle near, 
And the angels their watches keep : 
Dream, there is naught to fear. 



Man wants but little here below, 
He is not hard to please. 
But woman, — bless her little heart — 
Wants everything she sees. 

— Frances Powers. 



2310 The Euterpean. 

E. L. S. HALL. 



We Euterpeans are quite proud of our Society as a whole — 
proud of our pins — proud of our colors — proud of our girls and 
very proud of our hall. 

The old members will recall a rather bare and not overly 
attractive hall, around it cluster many fond recollections for they 
loved it, and yet, if they could be with us at our meetings now, we 
are sure they would love il more than ever. The color scheme — 
blue and white is carried out beautifully and the bare feeling quite 
done away with. On the floor is a heavy, rich, dark blue axmin- 
ster carpet — at the windows also we have dark blue chenille cur- 
tains. The wall paper is an attractive design of blue and white — 
the ceiling is beautified by a lovely hand painted fresco, repre- 
senting Euterpe, the goddess of music. Around this fresco are 
grouped four electric lights, these, together with the clusters of 
electric bulbs in the four corners of the room illuminate the hall 
with a soft and mellow light. 

Almost the first thing that meets our eye on opening the door 
is the group of handsome pictures over the piano. The collection 
of pictures in the hall consists of — Euterpe, Pharaoh's Horses, 
Longfellow and his home, a Madonna, a Christy picture, one of six 
poets and also one of six musicians. These, along with others and 
three or four pretty casts produce a decidedly artistic effect. 

Then we must not forget the library — not only is the book case 
very attractive but the up to date books within the case are still 
more so. 

An old member revisiting the hall would admire all these things 
and we are sure she would rejoice with us in the many improve- 
ments that have taken place. 



—The plan for the traversing of the Great Sahara with auto-, 
mobiles, which are not subject to the pangs of thirst, has collapsed 
in the ridicule of the jester, who pictured the "auto " stranded in 
the sands hundreds of miles from an oasis, with the apparatus 
hopelessly out of gear and the "chauffeur " frantically begging by 
wireless telegraphy, that a c.imel might be sent to pull the broken- 
down trap to a machine shop. There's a lot of common sense back 
of that joke. 



The Euterpean. 231 i 

iS.i change department. 



FRANCIS POWERS. 



— Very few Exchanges have been received this month, but we 
sincerely hope the table of this Department will be filled for 
February. 

— We read with great interest the " Linden Hall Echo," per- 
haps more especially as we recently had the pleasure of meeting the 
Principal and his wife. 

— "Davidson College Magazine" contains some very strong 
and instructive articles. 

— We were glad to welcome the "William Wood's College 
Record." 



Splinters. 



— A brilliant young musician who had been told to play the ar- 
peggios, — several days later informed her instructor she had not 
practiced the archipellagoes. 

— Ethel (comfortably seated in a big arm chair in the South 
Junior Room after a trip to New York) — " Say girls, do you know 
Wanamaker gives away birds with every glass of soda water? " 

Grace (always eager for information) — "No what kind of 
birds?" 

Ethel (disdainfully) — "Why, swallows of course ! " 

— An American and Englishman were one day driving togeth- 
er in the country, when, coming to a place where two roads crossed, 
they saw a sign bearing the inscription : " Ten miles to Fieldville. 
If you can't read call at the blacksmith's and he will tell you." The 
American seeing the nonsense of such a notice laughed heartily. 
His companion was unable to see the point, but begged to be 
allowed to sleep over it. 

The American was awakened the next morning by the English- 
man's laughter. On inquiring the cause of so much amusement, 
the latter replied : " Why I just saw the point to your ' sign joke.' 
The man that wrote that notice did not realize that the blacksmith 
might be out." 



2312 The Hesperian. 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Katie M. Kilbuck — Editor-in-chief. 
Sadie M. Rollins— Assistant Editor. 
Adah A. Petway — Literary Editor. 
Florence Moorman — Exchange Editor. 
Louise F. Harper — Business Manager. 



3Etrttortal department. 

— In looking back over the year 1902 we find it to be one of 
the most prosperous in the era of our Society as well as of our 
School. The Society has truly been a Hesperus to each of its 
members, showering its evening rays of light and beauty upon 
them and guiding them ever " onward and upward." 



— Adolph Lorenz is creating quite a stir with his wonderful 
"dry surgery." Coming from a poor family he was compelled to 
work for his education. When a mere boy he found a glove, and 
took it to his mother, who told him that he would have to hunt a 
long time before he could find the other glove. This impressed 
him so that he determined to find the mate to the glove, that is, he 
determined to find out to what key h.s life was tuned. When pre- 
vented from being an "all round" physician he took up dry sur- 
gery, and has become the Adolph Lorenz of today, highly honored 
and esteemed. He says, and we can say with him, that he thinks 
he has found " the other glove" at last. 



The Hesperian. 2313 

(From the Charlotte Observer.) 
A Visit to the Library. 



THE SMALL TALK OF THE BOOKS WHEN THEY ENGAGE IN 
CONVERSATION. 



An unexpected visit to the Salem College library showed a 
wonderful state of things. " Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch " 
stood with arms akimbo and an anxious pucker of her benevolent 
forehead as she looked over toward " Eastover Court House" 
where " Lazarre " in lace ruff, with sword at his side, was talking 
excitedly about " The Crisis " in his affairs to " The Carolina Cav- 
alier." So much depended upon the coming "Valley of Decis- 
ion," whether he should be recognized as true king of France, or 
have to return to the western frontier among " Wild Animals I 
Have Known " or " Animals That Hunt and Are Hunted." 

"Elizabeth," in her German garden, was asking "The Man 
from Glengarry" about "The Right of Way" for "Kim," in 
whom she was immensely interested, while the "April Baby," 
swinging "The Cat of Bubastes " by the tail to keep time was 
singing "Sweetheart Manette" to the tune of "The Suwanee 
River." 

"David Harum " and " D'ri and I" were hoping to bring 
about a better time by "The Reign of Law," when it would be 
possible in a good horse trade "To Have and to Hold" without 
so much outside interference. 

"The Gentleman from Indiana," arm in arm with "A Trav- 
eler from Altruria," was "Looking Backward" to "TheTurn of 
the Road, ' ' where ' ' Bob, Son of Battle' ' and ' ' Danny ' ' were hav- 
ing a regular old-time dog-fight, and it was extremely doubtful 
which would be "The Conqueror," on "The Battleground." 

"The Kentucky Cardinal " sat on " The Black Rock," pour- 
ing out his richest songs much like Riley's " Love Lyrics." 

"Aunt Serena" was telling " Marietta, the Maid of Venice," 
and "Cecillia" how, during "One Summer," she had helped 
' ' Truth Dexter " to a better position "In the Palace of the King, ' ' 
and "The Climax" was reached by her marriage with "Count 
Hannibal" in " The Isle of Unrest." 

" Eben Holden " and " Betsy Ross " were deep in a discussion 
over the merits of the first United States flag, while " The Little 



2314 The Hesperian. 

Minister" was waiting to marry them over the tongs, in gipsy 
fashion, and "The House With the Green Shutters" was being 
made ready for them. " Mistress Joy" was recalling " The Days 
of Auld Lang Syne" at "The Pines of Lory," while enjoying 
"Black Coffee and Repartee" with " Alice of Old Vincennes." 

"Little Lord Fauntleroy " was at "No. 5,, John Street" with 
"Little Saint Elizabeth" and "Sarah Crewe," where they were 
joined by " Happy Dodd," with " Tilda Jane" and " Eight Cous- 
ins" to do their Christmas shopping. 

"Jo's Boys" were annoying them with fire crackers, but were 
driven off by a " Friend to Caesar," who had put on " The Hel- 
met of Navarre," and was talking about their "Cadet Days" with 
" Thaddeus of Warsaw" and the "Cardinal's Musketeer." 

" The Virginian " and "Oliver Horn" were having a jolly 
time with "Captain Macklin," a real " Soldier of Fortune," while 
"The Sky Pilot" was teaching them a new trick in baseball. 
"John Henry" and "Clara J." were trying to solve the problem 
of " Love and Old Clothes" with " Hearts Courageous ;" while sit- 
ting on " Red Rock," talking of " Leopard Spots," they saw " A 
Speckled Bird" beautifully mottled, but it was frightened off by 
the "Prince of India" and "Ben Hur," who had been seeking 
for the "Cardinal's Snuff Box," which had been lost through 
" Ransom's Folly." By this time my head was in a perfect whirl, 
and I could say more emphatically than Solomon of old, "of 
making many books there is no end " 

E. A. Lehman. 



SHE KNEW. 



The grammar class was on the floor. 

"In the sentence, 'I love you,' what is the mood of the 
verb ?" asked the teacher. 

"Sentimental mood," replied one of the larger girls, who had 
spent most of the summer at the seashore. — Copied. 



The Hesperian. 2315 



Uoofcs of tije JBa)h 



ADAH A. PETWAY. 



— "Dr. Henry Van Dyke is an artist, and his stories are 
charming pieces of fiction. 'The Blue Flower,' is told by him 
with delicate feeling and with that fresh felicity of style which is at 
the command of this vigorous and fascinating writer," says Mr. 
Mabie, and we accept and are anxious to read. 

— James M. Barrie will be found at his best in ' ' The Little 
White Bird." 

— Joel Chandler Harris has proved himself the Dickens of the 
South in his last novel, " Gabriel Tolliver. " 

— The books that are still heading the list are "The Virgin- 
ian," by Owen Wister ; " Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch," by 
Alice Hegan ; "The Blue Flower," by Van Dyke; "The Letters 
of a Self-made Merchant to His Son," by Lorimer ; " Cecilia," by 
Crawford. 

— In our midst is a very quiet, unassuming little lady who is, 
we are gradually discovering, accomplished in many different 
branches. Not only does she deftly manipulate with the brush on 
canvas, china and glass, but brings forth exquisite, soul-touching, 
little melodies from the piano, with the daintiest of touches. 

To her, Miss Anna Siedenburg, we are indebted for the interest- 
ing little collection of " Fairy Tales and Fancies." 

These stories would' appear to a child perhaps merely as fairy 
tales, but to us older children there is shown a deeper current un- 
lying all the pretty quaint German creations. 

The little volume is very artistically gotten up with illustrations 
by the author. 



2316 The Hesperian. 

Hocate. 



SADIE M. ROLLINS. 



— Clarence Clewell, who is attending school at Lehigh, spent the 
holidays with his parents, Dr. and Mrs. Cleweil. He returned to 
Lehigh on Jan. 3d, 1903. 

— We are glad to welcome the Misses Spencer, from Texas, 
in our midst. 

— Emma Smith, our ex-Vice President and former Exchange 
Editor, has returned to Salem. We are delighted to have her 
with us again. 

— Miss Nina Porter, also an old Hesperian, is expected the 
last of the month. 

— Virginia Wadley, one of our former presidents, was married 
to Mr. Benjamin Franklin Harrison on December 18th, at Brent- 
wood Place, Bolingbroke, Ga. The society extends best wishes 
to them both. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Clewell gave an "At Home" during the 
Christmas holidays, and the girls report a " most glorious time " 
resulting from it. 

— The Sixth Room girls also gave an "At Home" to quite a 
number of their friends. 

— We welcome Mary Bailey into our midst as a boarder. We 
hope that she will enjoy her stay with us. 

— Elliot Taylor, a former Hesperian, is visiting her grand- 
parents on Main Street. 

— We were glad to add three new names to our roll book on 
last Friday evening. 

— Mrs. Thomas S. Rollins, an old Hesperian, is expected the 
last of January on a short visit. 

— Our President spent the holidays at her home in New York. 

— Pescud Chisman is with us again, after several weeks 
absence. 

— Blanche Nicholson has returned to school. 



The Hesperian. 2317 

ISxcijange department. 



FLORENCE MOORMAN. 



"The Mirror," from the Moravian Seminary, Bethlehem, Pa., 
is a very neat paper. In the last issue the sketch of Guinevere, the 
heroine of Tennyson's " Idylls of the King. " is a well-written and 
at the same time an interesting article. 

— We are glad to welcome "The Monthly Maroon," which 
comes from the University of Chicago. This bids fair to become 
one of our best exchanges. The December issue contains quite a 
number of short stories which will interest the reader. The sketch, 
entitled "Ben Hur at Home," gives us an excellent picture of 
Gen. Lew Wallace in every day life. 

— ''The Comenian," Bethlehem, Pa., is a good paper all 
around. In the last issue we found several cleverly written and 
instructive articles. 

— " The William Woods College Record " gives us an idea of 
the college life. ' The Eclipse,' a short article, is worthy of special 
mention. An Exchange Department would add interest to this 
paper. 

— A stranger was riding down the main street of Boston on 
his bicycle in the evening. A gentleman approached him : 

" Sir," said he, "your beacon has ceased it function." 

"Sir?" 

"Your illuminator, I say, is shrouded in unmitigated ob- 
livion." 

" I beg your pardon, but — " 

" The effulgence of your radiator has evanesced." 

"But, really, I don't quite" — 

"The transversal ether oscillations in your incandescer have 
been discontinued." 

Just then an unsophisticated little newsboy, across the way,, 
shouted : 

" Hey, mister, yer lamp's out !" 

— Copied. 



2218 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston- :altm. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2219 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 
By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 4.00 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
- Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say.- 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about you' people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says: " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. ( 

Winston-Salem N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, Jf. C. 



2320 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL, 



We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line of 

...;._.^0TI0N8,-:- ' 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 6 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-SALEM, TV. C 



The Academy. 2321 

HEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 

that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 

LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

BOSENBACHEB'S 
DEPARTMENT STOBES. 



2322 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute. 

OAK MIDGE, y. a 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H. HOLT, Prins. 



When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebake, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms 5330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



1793-The Bingham SchooH902-03 

Located on the Ashtville Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty Statks represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office, Asheville, N. C 



The Academy. 2323 

bi win if 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBEK, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER 



$0UTf)GRn RAILUJAY. 



The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, F. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N.C C.P.&T.A.,Ashevlile,N.C 

FRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARDWICK, 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D , C. 



2324 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for cataloguo. 

JAS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 






YOU 




IF 


WANT 






THE 




SO 


SHOE 






THAT'S 




SEE 


ALL 






THE 




US 


GO? 








: m 


'Bi©® 


WINSTON, 




N. 


c. 





hotel crousnES. 

J. L. JONES, late of Joues House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

.All'modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 



At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 



Feference Sil« m Fetnile .Academy 



THE ACADEMY. 

VoL 26. Winston-Salem, N. C. , February, 1903. No. 227. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties, All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



?£tittorial. 



— A recent visitor to the school remarked that the company of 
pupils appeared to enjoy special blessings in the matter of health. 
And so it is. To successfully follow out a course of study it is nec- 
essary that the mind should be aided by strength of body. This 
condition is certainly fulfilled at the present time within the school, 
for the bright eyes,, the good color in the cheeks, and the energetic 
actions betoken the fact that the physical health of the pupils is all 
that can be desired. 



— The remark about the health of the pupils reminds us that 
we have more to be thankful for in this respect than we usually con- 
sider. Our family is large, more than four hundred persons being 
connected with the school in one capacity or another. Yet in this 
large number there is seldom a death, in fact has been none in the 
midst of the boarding department for a number of years. This is a 
blessing that should call for great thankfulness to the giver of all 
the blessings which we enjoy. 



— It is a matter of the greatest interest to note the marked 
improvement which a pupil .shows even after only a few weeks resi- 



2326 The Academy. 

dence in the school. The regularity of the school life, the regular 
hours for meals, the full amount of needed sleep, the entire forget- 
fulness in regard to pet ills which may have occupied a large part of 
the attention in the dear home circle, all these things are of the ut- 
most benefit to a growing girl, and it often happens that a month or 
two within the school will work a great change in a pupil. This, 
too, is a matter of thankfulness. 

— While we are speaking of health, we wonder whether the 
patrons fully appreciate the many provisions made by the school for 
the protection of the health of their children. In Salem the care 
of the health and the development of the bodily powers receives far 
more attention than is ordinarily the case in schools. The one 
provision of a trained nurse to watch over the slightest bodily ill is 
a precaution which prevents illness, and is an advantage which few 
homes enjoy in connection with the minor ills. There is no doubt 
but that the professional care given by Miss Henderson is a great 
safeguard to prevent illness, and one which should give the parents a 
feeling of comfort in connection with their daughters while at Salem. 



— The month of February is usually a month in which it is 
difficult to secure the usual amount of physical exercises. This 
month after a consultation with the members of the faculty and with 
the pupils, special efforts were made to offset the usual bad weather 
which characterizes the month. This was done by introducing 
walks at any time of the day or week when a pleasant hour or bit 
of sunshine invited the girls to take a walk. Then, too, the walk- 
ing club was organized and walks of four, five, six miles and more 
are indulged in by those who are fond of this form of exercise. 



— The Walking Club, which numbers some thirty or more 
members, is ambitious. They are pleading for a trip to Kerners- 
ville. This is twelve miles distant. The trip includes a bracing 
three or four hours' walk, a glorious supper at the other end, and a 
ride on the train back to the college. If the energy of the Club 
holds out to take the necessary amount of previous training in walk- 
ing, and if the consent of the parents is obtained the outing will 
probably be given to the'faithful members. 



The Academy. 2327 

The reference to the possible trip to Kernersville reminds us 
of the walk to the mountains made by a company some years ago. 
This was a tramp of fifty-five miles, and no one was the worse for 
the trip. All depends upon the careful previous preparation and 
training. 



— While considering the question of physical training it is 
•right and proper to refer to the physical culture class under the 
care of Miss Ackerman. This is certainly a good work, and in 
addition to the good done the health of the pupils it also introduces 
greater grace in the movements of the members of this class. Appli- 
cation has been made by a number of girls to organize a class in 
regular gymnasium work, and this will probably be one of the 
features of the spring months which are now at our door. 



— In our plan of gradually placing before our readers the his- 
tory of the Centennial we this month take pleasure in printing the 
address of Senator Clark, on the morning of Commencement, last 
May. The address was greatly enjoyed at the time, but it was not 
possible for nearly all our friends to be present. Hence we are glad 
to place before our readers throughout our entire land this scholarly 
and able effort of our distinguished friend from the far North-west. 
Senator Clark made many friends on the occasion' of his visit, and 
we are glad to be able to thus place on file in The Academy the 
able address given in another part of this issue. 



—Our sympathies go out to Miss Mabel Butner, and to all 
the members of her afflicted family, in the death of Mrs. Garrett 
(Fannie Butner). In the full glow of young womanhood, with 
little warning, she was called to a higher home, and she leaves a 
bereaved husband and a large circle of mourning friends. It is a 
tender thought that she came to the dear old home to die, and that 
her body will rest in peace beneath the drooping cedars in the beau- 
tiful Moravian burying ground, which is so frequently spoken of as 
" God's Acre." 



2328 The Academy. 

The Alumnae Memorial Hall. 



The interests of the Memorial Hall have been quietly pushed 
forward during the past months. Every effort of this kind is cor- 
ried on like the swinging of the pendulum. At the Centennial cele- 
bratfon a nice long swing took place, and the subscription climbed 
up to the $8,000 mark. Since then other payments have been 
received, and, as the figures below show, the journey is now towards 
the $9,000 mark. The approaching commencement will, no doubt, 
add a handsome sum to the total amount. Since we last published 
the subscription list the following sums have been received. These 
amounts include the Centennial gifts and those in hand since. 

Miss Emma Carter, (Class '99), $5 00 ; Miss Emma Carter, 
.(Memorial Hall) ,$5 00 ; Mrs. A. W. Haywood, Haw River, N. C. ; 
$25 00 ; Mrs. J. H. Clewell, $5 00 ; Bethania Branch Association, 
$12 25 ; Academy Cooking School, $24.95 ; Mr. and Mrs. H. E. 
Fries,$25 00 ; Mrs. McLean, New York,$10 00; Sale of picture deco- 
rations, 95c. ; Mrs. P. H. Booe, $1 00 ; Mrs. A. B. Gorrell, $1 00 ; 
Mrs. P. H. Hanes, $15 00 ; Mrs. J. W. Wharton, $10 00 ; Mrs. 
F. W. Foster, $10 00 ; Miss Margaret Hanes, $5 00 ; Mrs. B. D. 
Bury, $1 00 ; Mrs. M. L. Mott, $1 00 ; Miss Sue Reynolds, $10 00; 
Miss Katharine Hanes, $10 00 ; Miss M. Keith, 25c. ; Mrs. F. W. 
Sheets, 50c. ; Mrs. M. D. Pruden, $5 00 ; Miss Daisy Thompson, 
$5 00 ; Mrs. Luther Clark, $10 00 ; Miss Lizzie Clement, $3 00 ; 
Miss M. E. Vogler, $5 00 ; Mrs. W. T. Gray, $1 00 ; Miss Mattie 
Baron, $1 00 ; Mrs. E. Overman, $2 00 ; Mrs. T. H. Pegram, Sr., 
■■$1 00 ; Mrs. Emma Grate, $2 00 ; Mrs. D. P. Gold, 50c; Mrs. M. 
D. McVoole, 30c. ; Mrs. L. M. Fries, $10 00 ; Mrs. M. F. Pat- 
terson, $5 00 ; Mrs. E. S. Crosland, (St. Cecilia window) 25c. ; 
Mrs. Bitting, 50c. ; Miss P. Bynum, $1 00 ; Miss A. Gaither, $5 00; 
Mrs. Florence Gaither, $5 00 ; Mrs. P. J. Brame, $1 00 ; Mrs. 
James E. Hall, 50c. ; Mrs. J. H. Kapp, $1 00 ; Cash placed in 
Collection Basket at the Alumnae Meeting, but without names at- 
tached, $59 50 ; Atlanta Branch Association, through their Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Daniel, $75 00 ; Miss Mary Osterbind, $5 00 ; Miss 
Mattie Erwin, $5 00 ; Miss Lizzie Chaffin, $1 00 ; Miss Ettie 
Brown, $3 00 ; Mrs. Henry Shaffner, $5 00 ; Mrs. Hattie Sutton, 
Rankin, $5 00 ; Miss Mary Pretlow, $10 00 ; Miss Fannie Pretlow, 
$10 00 ; Mrs. J. F. Shaffner, Sr., $5 00 ; Mrs. M. E. Cecil, $1 00; 



The Academy. 2329 

Mrs. D. McKinney Walker, $5 00 ; Miss Augusta Talcott, $3 00 ; 
Mrs. F. H. Fries, $50 00 ; Mrs. Laura Ellison Brown, $25 00 ; 
Mrs. Cornelia Patterson, (in memory of the three Graham sisters,) 
$200 00 ; Miss Adelaide Fries, $20 00 ; Mrs. J. W. Fries, $20 00; 
Proceeds Grand Concert, $207 25 ; Senator Clark, of Montana, 
$500 00 ; Interest, $2 85 ; Mrs. Sallie Fannie Hunnicutt Prescott, 
$5 00 ; Mrs. Nell Scales Tillman, $5 00 ; Miss Hazel Dooley, Class 
'99, $5 00; M*iss Hattie Adams, Class '99, $5 00; Mrs. Agnes 
Winston Goldsby, $5 00 ; Miss Annie Scott Lindsay, Class '99 ; 
^$5 00 ; Miss Lucy Johnston, Class '99, $2 00 ; Mrs. Fannie Wray 
Stewart, $10 00 ; Mrs. Bessie Gray Plumley, $5 00 ; Mr. Owen 
Leibert, Bethlehem, Pa., $100 00 ; Mr. John N. Woods, Stockton, 
Cal., $50 00 ; Mrs. Clement Manley, $10 00 ; Mrs. Henry Barrow, 
$2 50 ; Miss Florence Barrow, $2 50 ; Miss Irene McGehee, $2 50; 
Miss Nannie McGehee, $2 50 ; Mrs. Nettie Reed Harris, $5 00 ; 
Mrs. Annie Spencer Penn, $5 00 ; Mrs. J. D. Laugenour, $25 00 ; 
Mrs. Charles Vogler, $5 00 ; Mrs. Fannie Holt Scott, $10 00 ; Miss 
Grace Wolle, $3 00 ; Miss Carrie Ollinger, $1 00 ; Miss Annie 
Hill, $5 00; Interest, $2101; Miss Jennie Trimble, Class '99, 
$2 00 ; Miss Iola Walker, Class '-99, $2 00 ; Proceeds of Concert 
by Pupils and Members of Faculty, Salem Academy and College, 
Prof. Shirley, Director, $62 00 ; Concert, Summer, 1902, Mrs. 
Von Klenner, Director, $25 00 ; Miss Nellie Cramer, $1 00. 

This makes a grand total of contributions from all sources to 
date of $8478 45. 

Miss L. C. Shaffner, Secretary. 

Memorial Class, igoi : 
Miss Cora Lewis, $5 00 ; Miss Lura Cherry, $2 00. 

For Frame for Picture, Class Memorial, Class igoi. 
Proceeds supper, January, 1903, $28 50 ; Mrs. Margaret Pat- 
terson Griffin, $1 00 ; Miss Helen Reid, $1 00. 



— We all rejoice in the improvement in Miss Heisler's health.. 
It was a week of great anxiety which we had about the beginning 
of the new year, but now that we see her walking about the campus 
or in the public square in front of the school we feel that it will not 
be long till she is again at her duties. 



2330 The Academy. 

ADDRESS OF SENATOR CLARK, OF MONTANA. 

Centennial Co?n?7ience?it, May, 1903. 



Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

The eloquent and complimentary introduction by your honored 
townsman, expressing a hearty welcome and sense of obligation of. 
your people for my presence here, prompts me to acknowledge and 
contend that it is myself that should be congratulated for the honor 
and distinction which have been accorded me today. 

I have been deeply impressed with all the ceremonies I have 
witnessed ; and the magnificent picture now spread before me, com- 
prising this splendid audience of many thousand attentive people, 
seated in this great campus which is shaded by venerable trees of 
more than a century's growth, and in face of the line of old college 
buildings, which loom up through the foliage on the east, will be 
stamped upon the tablets of my memory and remain there as one of 
the most charming souvenirs of my life. 

A STRANGER, BUT AMONG FRIENDS. 

Some months ago a committee of ladies from your city, with 
the distinguished and indefatigable president of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation, Mrs. Patterson, at its head, and, amongst others, that earn- 
est co-worker and, as I have found, the most charming of all host- 
esses, Mrs. Reynolds, met me at the national capital, and extended 
to me a very cordial invitation to participate in the ceremonies of 
this centennial celebration ; and although a stranger to them and to 
all whom I would probably meet here, I accepted it promptly and 
with a pleasure I did not attempt to conceal. 

I long since learned from practical experience and observation 
that the proverbial hospitality of the people of the Sunny South was 
not a myth, and that it had in no wise been exaggerated, but that it 
was the real, live, genuine thing it was represented to be. Now, I 
must in truthfulness say that the old-fashioned generous warmth of 
welcome which has been extended to me on every side and at every 
threshold since my arrival here yesterday morning inflexibly con- 
firms all the sweet impressions that had developed in my mind, of 
the simplicity, chivalry and boundless hospitality of Southern men, 
and the charms, graces, beauty and manifold virtues of Southern 
women. 



N The Academy 23ol 

I am delighted to have the privilege of joining you in celebrat- 
ing the one hundredth anniversary of this deservedly famous institu- 
tion of education, which must be so gratifying to all of you who 
have had the honor and the pleasure of participating in the man- 
agement and direction of its affairs, as well as to those who have 
been the recipients of its blessings and material advantages. 

THE INSTITUTION'S WIDE INFLUENCE. 

As a factor in this community and this State, and, indeed, in 
a large number of States, its widespread and subtle influences in 
developing the mind, molding character, arousing latent ambitions, 
refining and elevating thought, and giving inspiration to noble im- 
pulse and purpose do not stop at the college door, the confines of 
the city or the boundaries of communities where the thousands of 
of the Alumnae who have gone out from here have made their 
homes ; but they imperceptibly affect other tens of thousands 
through communication and association like the invisible electric 
current exerts its mysterious power, and like the sweet symphonies 
of music and of nature that vibrate in illimitable space, never ceas- 
ing and ever-thrilling and ennobling with divine effect the highest 
attributes of the minds and hearts of human kind. 

The celebration of this hundredth anniversary of Salem College 
has a great significance, not only that it relates to a century of edu- 
cational growth and advancement, whose benefits no human power 
can ever approximately estimate ; but that it also suggests a cen- 
tury of industrial, commercial, inventive and scientific progress and 
expansion of population in your own State and in the nation at 
large. 

A review and contemplation of the nineteenth century — a 
period of our country's history so replete with wonderful events — 
excites and thrills our minds with surprise and admiration. 

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF PROGRESS. 

It was suggested to me by the ladies in charge of these cere- 
monies that I might in my remarks allude to the status of affairs in 
the United States in 1802. In a retrospective study of that period 
and the primitive conditions existing at the dawn of the nineteenth 
century in comparison with those we find today, we are struck with 
amazement at the rapidity of the advancement. Indeed, it is almost 



2332 The Academy. 

impossible to realize that in the year 1800 the total white population 
of the United States was only 9,999,999 souls. The center of pop- 
ulation was then between Washington and Baltimore. 

The entire white population west of the Alleghanies was less, 
than half-a-million, more than half of whom were in Kentucky and 
Tennessee. Ohio had only 45,000 people, and had not then been 
admitted to the Union. The settlements in that State were mostly 
on the Ohio river and its tributaries, and the whole territory in the 
lake region was in the hands of the Indians. 

Around Pittsburg, Pa. , around Fort Duquesne, a small popu- 
lation had gathered. In Westmoreland county there were some 
Dutch settlements, and on the Monongahela river and its tributaries 
a considerable number of Scotch-Irish, among them my own ances- 
tors, were cutting farms out of the forest. 

The only means of communication with all those settlements 
west of the mountains were two wagon roads, through an almost 
unbroken forest. One of these led from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, 
the other from Virginia to Tennessee, with a branch through Cum- 
berland Gap to Kentucky. 

Western JSfew York was still a wilderness ; Buffalo had not yet 
been laid out ; Utica had only fifty houses ; Albany was a Dutch 
village, with 5,000 inhabitants, and no packet boats plied between 
it and New York. Stage coaches required almost two days to make 
the journey from New York to Philadelphia as against two hours- 
now by rail. 

The mails in the Southern States were carried on horseback. 
In 1800 the nation's capital was transferred from Philadelphia to 
Washington, which then occupied a fever-stricken morass near the 
Potomac. The half-finished White House stood in a naked field, 
and across a swamp a mile and a half away could be seen the two 
wings of the unfinished capitol. 

These were some of the primitive conditions existing when this 
school was founded, and yet it seems almost incredible that the 
parents of thousands of people of the present generation were then 
living. 

SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS 

It might be of interest to mention a few of the important factors 
that originated at the close of the nineteenth century, to whose 
development may be largely credited the subsequent brilliant career 



The Academy, 2333 

of this nation. One of these was the invention of the cotton gin by 
Eli Whitney, a New Englander, who had settled in Georgia. Before 
this only a few patches of cotton had been planted in the South, 
and the separation of the seed from the lint was a slow and expen- 
sive process. Thereafter the cultivation of the plant extended rap- 
idly until it became its chief industry and led to the coronation of 
cotton as king of all the southern products. 

It is, I think, true that no other invention conceived in the 
mind of man, ever played so important a part in the commercial 
and industrial progress of the civilized world. About this time 
Fulton demonstrated the successful application of steam power for 
the propulsion of boats, with results almost inconceivable, which I 
can not take time to discuss. 

The first year of the past century witnessed the accession of 
Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency. This assured the signal 
triumph of republican principles, of which he was the eminent 
champion, over the theory of centralization of power as advocated 
by Alexander Hamilton and others. 

During his liberal and powerful, although not altogether har- 
monious administration, the greatest feat of diplomacy that has ever 
been enacted in any country was accomplished ; the purchase from 
France, for $15,000,000, of that great region lying between the 
Mississippi River on the east and the Spanish possessions on the 
south-west, extending to the Rocky Mountains on the north-west, 
and to the boundaries of British Columbia on the north, comprising 
the territory of Louisiana. President Jefferson, curious to ascertain 
the character of this new acquisition, promptly ordered an exploring 
expedition to be organized, which, placed under the direction of 
Lewis & Clark, made the famous voyage up the Missouri river to 
its sources, across the Rocky Mountains to the headwaters of the 
mighty Columbia, whose crystal waters flow from thousands of 
perennial snow-draped peaks, and extended their voyage to "the 
continuous woods, ' ' of which the poet sang 

" Where rolls the Oregon, 
And hears no sound save his own dashings. ' ' 

Then truly did the "Star of Empire" first take its way. 
To-day we behold the results ! That purchase comprised 560,000,.- 
000 acres, and now sustains a population of not less than 15,000,- 
000 people. 



'2334 The Academy. 

the great western empire. 

I might speak to you for hours in description of the marvellous 
resources of that great area, constituting an empire in itself, of the 
great wheat producing States of Kansas, Minnesota and the Dakotas, 
of the cornfields of Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska, of the great 
stretches of grazing lands which support millions of cattle, horses 
and sheep, where only a few years ago roamed countless buffalo, 
and of those great mineral regions all along the eastern slopes of 
the great Rocky Mountains from Colorado to British Columbia, 
which have yielded thousands of millions of dollars to the wealth of 
the world ; but the theme is too comprehensive, and, moreover, 
I should want to dwell upon the brilliant record of my own State, 
Montana, that alone produces a fourth of the copper supply of the 
world, but I must desist. 

The story of the development of all of that splendid acquisition 
is too long and fascinating, and the picture it presents so dazzling to 
contemplate that I must divert your attention from them and close 
my remarks with a brief reference to that which is the immediate 
object of your concern and devotion — the establishment and per- 
petuation of the seat of learning whose centenary we celebrate. It 
was the pioneer school in the South, and about the second in the 
nation. Its founders sprang from a religious society in Germany, 
which had its origin in Bohemia about 450 years ago, and whose 
membership spread with amazing rapidity throughout Bohemia, 
Moravia and Poland. It was the most progressive organization in 
educational matters and the most aggressive in pioneer missionary 
work that the world has ever known. 

SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES ESTABLISHED TOGETHER. 

Sehools were established wherever churches were built. The 
development of the mind was considered as essential as spiritual 
teaching, and the same policy has been tenaciously observed in the 
operations of its followers in the new world at Bethlehem, Pa., and 
afterwards when that little band of intrepid men of the Unites Fra- 
trum in 1753 left that place and established a colony in their new 
possessions acquired here in North Carolina. 

With steadfast purpose those sturdy people came to the wes- 
tern hemispheres and cast their lot beyond the confines of civiliza- 
tion, braved the perils of savagery and ignored all the difficulties 



The Academy. 2835 

that confront and menace human life on the frontier. They were 
working out a destiny. The tree they planted in the wildnerness 
was of slow growth, but it took deep root, and nurtured by the 
sunlight of christian devotion, in an atmosphere every vibration 
scintillating with the radiance that springs from faith and hope, 
beneath a sky lighted by the bow of promise, it is now yielding a 
prolific harvest of golden fruit, as the thousands of gracious women 
all over the South, who here received physical and mental training, 
and the descendants of those who have passed away so eloquently 
affirm. I thought of this an hour ago when those thirty-six lovely 
girls, composing the graduating class, clothed in garments of spot- 
less white, and united by a long chain composed entirely of daisies, 
extending in graceful loops from shoulder to shoulder, filed into the 
church to receive their well-earned diplomas ; and when the vener- 
able bishop gave, them his parting blessing and, touchingly, with 
trembling lips said good-bye that brought tears to every eye, I was 
impressed with the fact that these precious young lives going out to 
separate communities all over the country would each one of them 
constitute a light that will illuminate the minds of others and whose 
radiance will go on forever. 

WARMEST CONGRATULATIONS EXTENDED. 

This affords a striking and interesting exemplification of the 
evolution and practical operation of one of the great problems of 
civilization. I beg to offer to all who have contributed to the 
success of this institution, or who have felt the magic touch of its 
influence, my warmest congratulations, and to express the hope 
that a recurrence of this anniversary festival a century hence may 
confirm all our impressions and all our anticipations of an enlarged 
scope, higher standards and grander results that will ultimately keep 
this college in the front ranks in the resistless march of progress. 

I believe that the tendency of public sentiment and opinion at 
this time is in the direction of the higher education and a wider 
sphere of employment and usefulness for women and towards a more 
liberal recognition of her claims to the enjoyment of privileges in 
the field of literary work, and in the domain of arts and sciences. 
In the encouragement of such healthful and laudable ambition I 
conceive it to be our duty to invoke the cooperation of every broad- 
minded patriotic citizen. Thus will we secure the attainment of the 
highest intellectual culture and most exalted and perfected civiliza- 
tion in this most active theatre of the human intellect — our own 
glorious Republic. 



2236 The Academy. 

gtfbtxmicU anU (gossip. 

— A splendid feeling of good fellowship is abroad in the school, 
and the ' ' at home ' ' invitations which are sent here and there be- 
tween the several classes and societies show that this is is no exag- 
geration. This is particularly pleasing in view of the strife which is 
often noted between classes in other schools. 

— A number of new pupils have registered during the past 
weeks. We give the following, although it is not a complete list : 
Willie Edmunds, Minnie Knox Spencer, Mary Althrop 
Spencer, Clyde Lyon, Mildred Lott, Maud M. Gettys, 
Maggie Jones, Lillian Burk, Ethel Bryant, Velsia Webb, 
Zinka Colby, Alline McLain, Ethel Corbin. We will pub- 
lish the remainder of the list next month. 

— Special preparations are being made for the proper celebration 
of the sesqui-centennial of the settlement of Wachovia: It will be 
one hundred and fifty years since the first settlors came to Wacho- 
via, which event was of great moment to the State of North Caro- 
lina as a whole, and hence was not only a local event. The plans 
which are being devised are liberal, and will, no doubt, meet with a 
hearty response on the part of the community and of the State. 

— The large willow tree on the campus has been trimmed dur- 
ing the past days. It seems a shame to lop off the great drooping 
branches, but they had attained to such a size that a severe storm 
of sleet, with the limbs covered with ice, would no doubt have des- 
troyed the historic old tree. We hope it will not be long till the 
graceful green sprouts will again be a thing of beauty to be admired 
by all. 

— The Vesper services are held on Sunday evening, as usual, 
and on these occasions various friends from town have been with us. 
We are always glad to welcome these esteemed visitors, and to 
hear them speak and sing as the case may be. 

— The concert given by the members of the Faculty and the 
pupils for the benefit of the Alumnae Memorial Hall was a success 
in every way. The plans were under the direction of Prof. Shir- 
ley, assisted by Misses Morrison and Ackerman. The admission 
fee was small, but still the proceeds swelled the building fund more 
than sixty dollars. 



The Academy. 2337 

$n HfUmoriam. 



It sends a thrill of deepest sorrow and sympathy through such 
a community as ours when a young life is cut short in the midst of 
usefulness and joy and hope. The death of Mrs. C. P. Garrett 
(Fannie Butner) in the early morning hours of Feb. 14, 1903, 
sent a thrill through our twin towns, and is one of those mysterious 
dispensations in which we can only bow to the will of Him who says, 
"What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter." 

Mrs. Garrett was born in Hope, Ind. , and came to Salem at an 
early age, was brought up in our midst, graduated in the Class of 
1890, where she won all hearts by her sweet and attractive person- 
ality. As the wife of Prof. C. P. Garrett she resided with him in 
Knoxville, Tenn. , for some seven years. Later they went to Ham- 
ilton, Canada, where, as in Knoxville, her rare musical gifts and 
charming, kindly ways made her an acquisition of great value, and 
the sorrow there is second only to the sorrow- here. 

Some day when the mists and shadows of this earth-life have 
rolled away, in the glorious brightness of the Heavenly Land, all 
these dark problems which so grieve and sadden us now will be 
made plain to us. 

Despite the inclement weather there was a very large attend- 
ance at the funeral service conducted over the remains of Mrs. 
Garrett at the Home Moravian Church, on February 1(1 The 
services were very impressive. There was a reading of the Scrip- 
ture lesson by Dr. J. H. Clewell, after which the very appropriate 
hymn, "Asleep in Jesus," was sung by the congregation, followed 
by prayer by Dr. Caldwell. Bishop Rondthaler then read "In 
Memoriam, ' ' and a solo ' ' Lead Kindly Light, ' ' was sung with fine 
feeling and effect, and the services were brought to a close by those 
in attendance singing the hymn, ' ' Nearer My God to Thee. ' ' 
Bishop Rondthaler paid a very high tribute to the deceased, men- 
tioning in his address the cheerful, winning, happy ways and dis- 
position of Mrs. Garrett, of which all her friends and those in attend- 
ance were aware. 

Mrs. Garrett leaves hundreds of friends in Winston-Salem who 
mourn her loss. 



THE EUTERPEAN 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 

L. Pauline Sessoms— Editor-in-chief. 
Mary B. Gudger- Assistant Editor. 
Frances Powers — Exchange Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby — Literary Editor. 
Corinne Baskin— Business Manager. 



lETutortal. 



— Would it not be worth while for us to stop long enough dur- 
ing these long and trying days to consider for a moment whether or 
not in our eagerness to accomplish our own work we always remem- 
ber and encourage our friends who are often equally heavy laden ? 

To help and encourage others does not necessarily mean that 
we must bear their burdens as well as our own, but by being good- 
tempered we may often avoid many little unpleasant happenings, 
and we are apt to have a larger number of friends than the girl who 
grumbles and who is continually fault-finding. 

Good humor is contagious, and one doesn't in the least mind 
being exposed to it because we all hope to catch it. If we do not 
get it sooner or later the trouble lies entirelv within ourselves. 

A girl of this tvpe is sought after, for no matter what the occa- 
sion is she will prove equal to it. She is not selfish, and she can 
make a required sacrifice with a smile. Her friends learn to depend 
upon her — they want her good opinions and they invariably profit 
by her advice. 

We all have a natural desire to be worthy of admiration and 
praise. If our dispositions have become soured let us begin to 
remedy the trouble, and to cultivate first of all good humor. 



The Euterpean 2339- 

Elocution as an Art. 



Fine arts may be divided into two parts, — those that create and 
those that re-create. In the first class we have painting, sculpture, 
musical composition and, in its highest sense, oratory. In the 
re-create we have both vocal and instrumental music. 

Some people put in a plea that elocution is not an Art, but 
Stafford Brooks says : "he who recognizes and is moved by the 
beautiful is artistic ; he who makes that beauty manifest is an artist. ' ' 
Does not the reader comply with all these conditions ? It has been 
said by some that a large part of the reader' s technique is born with 
him, but it does not take many years of hard study and training of 
the voice before we can rightly be called an artist. 

Technique alone does not make the artist, but if he has not the 
genius to select the significant details, and the ability to arrange 
them, no matter what his technical ability is, he falls short of being 
in a true sense an artist. All readers are not termed artists, neither 
are all paintings works of art. Does it not require intellectual and 
imaginative qualities to grasp a play or a poem in its entirety ? 
This is the first requirement antecedent to artistic reading. Musi- 
cians will find that their art is a great deal easier than the reader's, 
because the former have certain notes set down for them by the 
composer, but, on the other hand, the reader has a thousand or 
more different melodies from which to choose, in order to bring out 
certain ideas which make known the author's meaning. 

We all will agree that " the voice is the true index of the soul," 
for ' ' out of the mouth the heart speaketh. " m. c. , ' 03. 



The Champs Elysees. 



AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY 



Do you own a kodak ? If so, you can well imagine what pleas- 
ure it gave me to photograph for the first time, a portion of that 
superb avenue of " gai Paris," namely the Champs Elysees. 

It was a beautiful morning in Spring, the golden sunbeams 
played at hide and seek among the fresh green branches and fragrant 
blossoms of the chestnut and accacia trees which stand like sentinels 
in double file on either side of the pavements which border the broad 



2340 The Euterpean 

avenue. Looking upward from the Place de la Concorde at the foot 
of the Elysian Fields, one could see in the distance the Arc de Tri- 
omphe rising majestically heavenward, but between that magnfficent 
memorial of Napoleon's victories and one's own insignificant self, 
there rolled and whirled a veritable sea of vehicles of all sizes and 
descriptions. The coach of the Marquise de So and So hurried by 
the delivery wagon of the ' ' Magasin du Louvre ' ' and the light vic- 
toria, in which was seated the dark eyed ' ' Princesse, ' ' arrayed in 
costly silk and filmy lace, driven by her liveried coachman with the 
:Spruce footman perched by his side, came in close proximity with 
the dingy cab whose lazy ' ' cocher ' ' sat sleepily upon the tall box, 
or the huge ominbus which lumbered slowly up and down with its 
load of passengers. 

Below the Rond Point, dotted here and there under the pro- 
tecting shade of trees, are picturesque little booths, with awnings of 
red or white, where the gracious ' ' bonnes femmes ' ' smilingly ex- 
change gingerbread, fruit and candy for the sous of the rosy-cheeked 
boys and girls, who, weary of play, come to partake of these deli- 
cious refreshments ; beyond are the Punch and Judy shows, where the 
children sit on the low benches by the hour, watching with a never- 
dying interest, the mancevres of the Marionettes. Then we must 
not forget the merry-go-rounds. Here for the enormous sum of 
one sou, you are privileged to mount a lion's tawny back, or ride a 
fiery steed who, inspired by lively music, speeds round and round 
until at last you nearly tumble off from sheer exhaustion. 

Throngs of people from all nations of the world constantly pass 
each other on this beautiful promenade. Some come merely to 
see the exquisite flowers and splashing fountains, or to watch the 
happy little ones at their play ; some are hastening to their work in 
various portions of the busy city ; others are wending their way 
toward some place of amusement or instruction and still others just 
— sight seers. 

The nurses, enveloped in their long capes which almost touch 
the ground, and each wearing the color of her province in the snow- 
white cap, form a striking contrast to the servants of our native 
land. The flower girls, laden with great baskets heaped with yellow 
jonquills, purple violets, sprays of sweet mignonette and pure lillies 
of the valley, seem to enjoy calling" to the passers-by: " Fleurs, 
fleurs? void vos jolies fleurs ! fleurs? fleurs ." and this in musical 



The Euterpean. 2341 

cadence, for the Parisian street venders are regularly taught to make 
their cries agreeable. 

Here go the boys of some seminary, led and followed by watch- 
ful priests, and there the light-hearted merry girls of a neighboring 
"Pension," with the trim little mademoiselle tripping closely at 
their heels. Here the friar, poring over his breviary, unconsciously 
jostles against the baker's boy, causing the latter to drop the ring 
of bread which he was carrying under his arm, and to upset the 
basket of queerly-shaped loaves that he had balanced on his head. 
I am afraid that the French which was then spoken would not do 
to translate. Farther on are numerous cafes in front of which are 
placed small tables and chairs, where, in warm weather, you may 
procure seasonable dishes and cooling drinks, and enjoy them in 
the open air. 

At the upper end of the avenue, not far from the Place de 
L'Etoile stands the Palace Hotel, which well deserves its name, and 
several handsome residences of the nobility, bankers and other 
wealthy Parisians. 

What a great difference there is between this gay scene and 
those of the Revolution and Reign of Terror, when the pavements 
were stained with blood and the cruel ' ' Maiden ' ' stood ready to 
grasp her hapless victims in her deadly embrace ! Heaven grant 
that the wfngs of Peace may ever shelter the sunny Land of France. 



Seniors' "At Home." 



One of the most delightful events of the season was the ' ' At 
Home," given on Valentine's Eve by the Seniors to the members 
of the Junior Class. 

It was an ideal Valentine party, if you will pardon the use of 
this old-fashioned word. On the white window curtains were myr- 
iads of tiny red hearts, and suspended over the doorways were huge 
hearts of crimson. In one secluded nook was an enormous golden 
heart which was the target at which the gilded arrows of Fortune 
were aimed. Indeed, there were hearts here, there and everywhere 
and in each corner lurked invisible cupids whose shafts of love and 
good cheer pierced the throbbing hearts of all present. A very 
eujoyable feature of the evening was the literary contest which Miss 



2342 The Euterpean. 

Lehman had prepared for the occasion. After this broken hearts 
seemed to be the order of the day. Each guest was given a portion 
of a heart which could only be mended by the unknown person who 
held the corresponding fragment, and who was destined to be her 
companion during the remainder of the evening. Finally, when all 
the hearts were made whole, the happy company left the Senior 
rooms to partake of the delicious refreshments which were served in 
the beautifully decorated rooms down stairs. 

Bishop Rondthaler announced that he had been requested to 
award the prizes. He assured us that if he had arrived earlier in 
the game Miss Julia Barnard would not have been his colleague 
in "boobyism," and, strange to say, we believed him. The first 
prize, a handsomely bound volume of "Hearts Courageous," was 
won by Miss Alice Gray, of Winston, and the second prize, a 
lovely Gibson head, the dainty handiwork of Miss Petway, was 
presented to Miss Nataline Haynes. 

Time flies when the little god of Love is hard at work, and it 
is no wonder that the hour of bidding our fair hostesses adieu ar- 
rived all too soon. Reluctantly we wished Miss Lehman and her 
girls good night. A. B. G. 

IBxrijange department. 

ERANCIS POWERS. 



— The Alpha reached us last month for the first time. Not 
only the outward appearance of this exchange, but also the con- 
tents speak well for the editors. We gladly place it on our list. 

— We were delighted to welcome The Comcnian. The Janu- 
ary number contains some interesting articles. 

— From Chicago comes the Monthly Maroon, a most charming 
magazine. The French article, ' ' Le Petit Enfant et le Grand 
Homme," is a very touching little story. The writer deserves 
much credit. 

— The Hall Boy is a witty, bright paper. 



The Euterpkan. 2343 

Me, Too. 

Thar are these six things ez the Lord doth hate — 
Yes, seven ez make Him sick ! 
I wuz thinking' 'em over myself last night, 
An' they're enough to make enny one kick ! 
Ye kin find the hull list, ef ye don' t believe me, 
In Proverbs, along to'rds the fust ; 
And uv all the sins of humanity, 
I guess they are clus tew the wust. 

A proud look on the face uv a man 

Ez hain't got no pride at all ; 

Who don't even know the sense uv the word — 

Who thinks it means nothin' but gall ? 

A lyin' tongue that nags, b'gosh, 

Like the clack uv an old grist mill — 

Thet is hung in the middle and works both ends, 

Thet deth alone kin keep still ! 

Hands that shed innercent blood comes next, 

An' I calkerlate ye' 11 agree 

Thet thar's nothin' more pizon in enny one 

Than deliberet krewelty ! 

An' then thar's the heart thet's busy all day 

An' purty near all the night, 

A-devisin' all kinds uv wickedness, 

An' tryin' to make black look white ! 

Nur He don't like the feet thet be so swift 

Ter run inter mischief and sich ; 

The path that they make don't run very straight, 

And like ez not leads tew a ditch ! 

A crooked witness ez can't speak the trewth, 

Don't cut enny figger with Him ! 

A perjerer's chances uv gittin' thar, 

I reckin are all-fired slim ! 

Then the feller thet's allers a-raisin' a row 

'Twixt people ez want ter be friends ; 

He's the last on the list, but he won't be the least 

When He declares His dividends ! 

These are the things ez the Lord just hates 
And abomernates all the way threw ; 
I wuz thinkin' 'em over myself last night, 
An' I'll be blamed ef I don't tew. 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Katie M. Kilbuck — Editor-in-chief. 
Sadie M. Rollins — Assistant Editor. 
Adah A. Petway — Literary Editor. 
Florence Moorman— Exchange Editor. 
Louise F. Harper — Business Manager. 



IHtrttonal Bepartment. 

— The abolishing of the reading of the essays of Commence- 
ment is certainly a good thing, for the graduates will still have the 
composition work to do in their ' ' theses, ' ' which are to have from 
1,000 to 2,000 words in them for those taking the degree of A. B. , 
and from 3,000 to 4,000 words for those taking the B. L. degree. 
These theses must be submitted to the Faculty and approved by 
them, but not read at Commencement as has been the custom here- 
tofore. This necessarily cuts the closing exercises down to a few 
days, a more convenient arrangement for visitors. 



— One caunot be too particular with punctuation, even an omis- 
sion of a comma will sometimes cause great disaster. The following 
is a true illustration of carelessness in this very line : 

A merchant had sent one of his agents to buy some goods for 
him. The prices were very high, and the agent was at a loss 
whether to buv or not so sent the quoted prices to his employer 
asking if he should buy. The reply was : " No price too high. ' ' 
Consequently the goods were bought, and the merchant came near 
being ruined. The message he meant to send was: "No, price 
too high. 



The Hesperian. 2345 

Happiness. 



Happiness is known only by name on the earth. The word 
happy when applied to any state or condition of human life will 
admit of no positive definition, but is merely a relative term : that 
is, when we call a man happy we mean that he is happier than some 
others with whom we compare him, or that he himself was in some 
other situation. 

Happiness does not consist in pleasures of sense, in whatever 
profusion or variety they be enjoyed. By pleasures of sense are 
meant the animal gratifications of eating, drinking, and the more 
refined pleasures of music, painting, architecture, gardening, splen- 
did shows, theatric exhibitions, and the pleasures, lastly, of active 
sports as hunting, shooting, fighting, &c. These pleasures con- 
tinue for but a little while at a time. By repetition they lose their 
relish. There is hardly any one who has not found the difference 
between a gratification when new and familiar, and any pleasure 
which does not become indifferent as it grows habitual. 

Philosophy smiles at the contempt with which the rich and 
great speak of the petty strifes and competitions of the poor ; not 
reflecting that these strifes and competitions are just as reasonable 
as their own, and the pleasure which succeeds affords the same. 

The art in which the secret happiness in a great measure con- 
sists is to set the habits in such a manner that every change may be 
a change for the better. The habits themselves are much the same ; 
for whatever is made habitual becomes smooth, easy and indifferent. 

That which suspends the occupation of a card-player distresses 
him ; whereas, to the laborer every interruption is a refreshment ; 
and this appears in the different effect that the Sabbath produces 
upon the two, which proves a day of recreation to the one and a 
lamentable burden to the other. 

A reader who has inured himself to books of science and argu- 
mentation, if a novel, a well-written pamphlet, an article of news, a 
narrative of a curious voyage, or the journal of a traveller, fall in his 
way, sits down to the repast with relish, enjoys his entertainment 
while it lasts, and can return to his graver reading without distaste. 
Another with whom nothing will go down but works of humor and 
pleasantry, or whose curiosity must be interested by perpetual nov- 
elty, will consume the window of a bookstore in half a day ; during 



2346 The Hesperian. 

which he is rather in search of diversion than diverted, and books 
to his taste are few and short and rapidly read over, the stock is 
soon exhausted, when he is left without resource from this principal 
supply of innocent amusement. 

We, therefore, come to these conclusions : that happiness is 
pretty equally distributed amongst the different orders of civil 
society, and that vice has no advantage over virtue, even with res- 
pect to this world's happiness. 

We Live to Learn. 

Mtinsey' s Magazine for January, in an article headed "The 
Triumphs of Youth," gives us some striking examples of the achieve- 
ments of young men. The first name that appears is that of Alex- 
ander of Macedon — afterward Alexander the Great of Greece, who 
' ' at thirty was sighing for more worlds to conquer. ' ' Other names 
following his are : Edward, Prince of Wales, the Black Prince, who 
won his spurs at Crecy, at the age of sixteen, and, at twenty-six, 
fought the great battle of Poictiers ; Mozart, who played with his 
sister, Mariamne, before the Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, 
when he was but six years old ; Byron, who, at the age of twenty- 
four, became famous through his poem of travels, " Childe Harold," 
and Percy Bysshe Shelley, an English poet of note, who did all his 
writing before he was thirty years old, for at that age he died. 

Thus we are reminded that there is no time like the present 
for accomplishing tasks. Had Alexander the Great demurred when 
his first opportunity presented itself, he might have remained simple 
Alexander of Macedon instead of becoming the man of history that 
he did become. Records have proved this truth whether the men 
in question belong to literature, science, the professional world, or 
the field of history. The rule of never putting off till to-morrow 
what can be done to-day can apply to us in our every day life. For 
if we are always 

' ' Up and doing 

With a heart for any fate, 

Still achieving, still pursuing, 

Learn to labor and to wait ' ' 

who knows but that we, like great men, when we depart may 

' ' Leave behind us 
F"oot-prints in the sands of time." 



The Hesperian. 2347 

lExeijange department. 



FLORENCE MOORMAN. 



— From Crite, Nebraska, The Lincolnian comes to us. This is 
one of our best exchanges, and the January number is quite up to 
its usual high standard. In it we find ' ' The Lost Child, ' ' a con- 
tinued story. We regret that we must needs wait until some future 
day to complete the reading of this very fnteresting story. The 
' ' local ' ' and ' ' society ' ' news of this paper are splendid de- 
partments. 

— The January number of the High School Gazette, published 
by the Senior Class of Trinity Park High School, contains two short 
stories, "The Little Model" and " Louise's Retribution ;" also an 
interesting and instructive article, entitled ' ' Life of George Eliot. ' ' 
By reading this article we learn many interesting details of the life 
of this great woman and brilliant author. 

— The Linden Hall Echo, Lititz, Pa., gives us a charming pic- 
ture of the life spent at another Moravian School similar to our own. 

— The Doane Owl is a neat little paper and always welcomed 
to our exchange table. 

— We notice from the papers that the capital stock of the 
Wachovia Loan and Trust Company has been increased to $600,000. 
This is the largest capital of any bank in North Carolfna. The 
company has branch banks at several places in North Carolina and 
Virginia. 

(Girl). " I know why you like Mary ; because she feeds you 
on taffy. ' ' 

(Teacher). " Oh ! she hasn't given me candy but twice this 
year. ' ' 

— Ask one of our graduates in Algebra what is meant by illu- 
mination. ' ' 

— Rev. James E. Hall, one of the Trustees, visited the 
school a week or two since, and inspected the classes as they were 
engaged in their morning duties. 

— Mrs. Hazel Dooley Norfleet attended vesper service in the 
Academy Chapel several Sundays ago and sang a beautiful solo. 



2348 The Hesperian. 

ILocate. 



SADIE M. ROLLINS. 



— Misses Lenora Coleman and Mary Jones spent several 
days in Salisbury this month. 

— The Fifth Room girls gave a chafing dish party to Miss Elliot 
Taylor, a former Hesperian, who is visiting in town. 

— It was with great sorrow that we watched them cut the limbs 
of the dear old willow tree. However, we hope that it will not be 
long before new verdue and beauty will appear in the fresh growth. 

— The Concert given in the Chapel Tuesday night, February 
3rd, proved quite a success. 

— Misses Johnston and Ackerman entertained their pupils on 
Friday night, February 6th. The gfrls reported a fine time and 
considered themselves lucky to have been a part of the company. 

— Zeta Slack, a member of our Society, is visiting her home in 
Bristol, Tenn. 

— Margurite Hines had quite a pleasant surprise this month. 
Her mother, Mrs. Hines spent several days with her in Salem. 

— We are glad to hear that Mary Richardson is improving 
and hope that before long she will be with us again. 

— Mr. Francis Gudger, of Asheville, N. C. , spent two days 
with his sisters, Mary and Emma Gudger. 

— One of our recent programs treated of ' ' Dialect Writers of 
Note." A sketch was read, selections were given from Eugene 
Field and Whitcomb Riley. While music of an appropriate nature 
constituted the other members of the program. Our next meeting 
is to be a Bryant- Longfellow evening. The officers are formulating 
other programs which they hope will prove enjoyable and beneficial 
to one and all. 



— (S. F. A. girl in store). " Have you any black kid gloves?" 
(Clerk) — " No, miss, but we have dog-skin gloves." 
(S. F. A. girl) — " Well, what color was the dog?" 



The Hesperian. 2349- 

Hiterarg i^otes. 



ADAH A. PETWAY. 



Best Selling Books. 



" Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch." — Hegan. 

"The Blue Flower." — Van Dyke. 

" The Virginian." — Wister. 

" Wanted : A Chaperone. " — Ford. 

"An Old Sweethart of Mine." — Riley. 

"Glengarry School Days." — Connor. 



The Literary Deaths of 1902. 



Emile Zola, Bret Harte, Frank R. Stockton, Jean de Bloch, 
Frank Norris, George Douglas Brown, Henri Greville, E. L. God- 
kin, Xavier de Montepiu, Philip James Bailey, Samuel Rawson 
Gardiner, Lord Ashton, Aure'lieu Scholl, Eugene Muritz, Paul 
Leicester Ford, Mrs. Alexander, George Henty, Thomas Dunn 
English, William Allen Butler, Mary Hartford Catherwood. 

While Emile Zola undoubtedly was the greatest of the above 
list, there is no country which has suffered more during the past year 
than our own. 

' ' The Master of Warlock, ' ' by George Cary Eggleston, author 
of ' ' Dorothy South. " "A Carolina Cavalier, ' ' a delightful little 
story of the Civil War, dealing principally with two lovers who are 
separated by a family feud at first ; but when the hero goes to war 
the maid "Agatha," serves him in many ways, through many hard- 
ships and adventures and of course are happily wedded in the end. 



Reflections of a Rejected Manuscript. 



In submitting a MS. he who hesitates — is a wonder. 

All is not gold that glitters — on a book cover. 

Faint purse ne'er won fair publisher. 

A true friend is one who laughs at our jokes. 

It fs a wise author who knows his own MS. after — it has been 
blue pencilled. 

' ' Many Happy Returns of the Day ' ' applies to the unsuccess- 
ful writer all the year round. 

— Copied from The Bookman.^ 



2350 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
** Sorosis" Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston-Salem. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Hade by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2351 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 

By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say.- 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about you- people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says: " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLBR & SON, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



2352 . The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL. 

We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new- 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line :>f 

— i-NOTIONS,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-SALEM, IV. C 



The Academy. 2353 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 

that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 

LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



2354 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

OAK midge, jv. a 

(near salem) 

FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 

The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H. HOLT, Piins. 

When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place vour son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1803. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham SchooM902-03 

Located on the Ashevllle Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. Et. Bingham, Supt., Post Office. Asheville, N. C 



The Academy. 



2355 



L. 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
COENICE "WORKER 



JOUTBGRn RAILOJAY. 



The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, P. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N. C C.P.& T.A.,Ashevlile,N.C 

PRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARDWICK, 

3d V. P. & Gen,. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D. C. 



2356 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter Srate University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogue 

J AS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



YOU 

WANT 
THE 



THAT'S 
ALL 
THE 
GO? 



IF 
SO 

SEE 

US 



K©« 



'J)W® 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL jrOIsTIES- 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

•All^modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supj lied 
'^~i with the very best thai the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 
At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference Salem FemVe Academy 



THE ACADEMY. 



Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C. , March, 1903. No. 228. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



lEtiitottal. 



SouveniriPostal Cards. 



A handsome set of Souvenir Postal Cards of scenes in Winston- 
Salem have been printed, and have been placed on sale at several 
places in the Twin-City. The set was printed under the direction 
of Miss Adelaide Fries, and consists of the following views : 

Salem Academy and College. Moravian Church. Cedar Ave- 
nue. Archive House. Wachovia Loan and Trust Co. People's 
National Bank Building. A Tobacco Sale. Forsyth Court House. 

These cards will be sent postpaid to any address at 3c. each, 
or 20c. for the set. 



— The Young Men's Christian Association of North Carolina 
met in Winston-Salem in March. On the afternoon of Sunday, 
March 8, the Charlotte Quartette sang two selections in our Vesper 
service, and Mr. Mason delivered a very earnest address. The fol- 
lowing evening the regular session of the Convention was held in 
the Academy Chapel. The occasion was prefaced by a recital 
given by the pupils of Salem Academy and College, and the various 
numbers were received with unusual enthusiasm by the audience. 
T.Iany members o_ the Convention visited the College during the 
week. 



2358 The Academy. 

COMMENCEMENT. 



The general plans for Commencement are nearly complete, and 
we give below an outline of the same. It is possible that one or 
another detail will be changed, but the general outline will not be 
different from that which is given below. 

It will be noticed that this Commencement will be in general 
the same as in former years, though the exercises will not begin 
before Sunday's sermon, and will close on Wednesday, instead of 
on Thursday. By the special request of the Senior Class the read- 
ing of Essays will be restricted to those which will be heard on 
Monday afternoon, which is Seniors' Day, and the Essays which 
will be read will be those relating to the special exercises of 
that day. 

The programme of the week is as follows : 

Sunday, May 25, Baccalaureate Sermon. This will be deliv- 
ered at 11 o'clock, a. m. 

On the evening of Commencement Sunday it is proposed to 
arrange a special programme, which, if carried out as proposed, will 
add to the devotional features of the day. 

Monday, May 25, is the Seniors' Class Day, In the morning 
a special programme is being prepared, which embraces among 
other interesting features, the planting of the Class Tree. The 
afternoon will be the time of the Class Exercises proper, and the 
young ladies propose to introduce features which are new and unique 
and which thev hope to make one of the most pleasing exercises of 
this nature thus far held. 

Monday evening will be the first of the two musical concerts. 

Tuesday will be Alumnae Day. At the time we print this 
number of The Academy the Alumnae Society Executive Com- 
mittee has not met, and hence we cannot present the details of 
their plans. 

The Grand Concert will be given on Tuesday night. 

Wednesday morning. May 27, is the date for the Commence- 
ment proper. These exercises will consist of the Presentation of 
Diplomas and the Conferring of Degrees. The literary address will 
be delivered by Judge H. G. Connor, of the Supreme Court. 

We believe that the programme, as outlined above, will be 
very acceptable to the friends of the School and the public gener- 



The Academy. 2359 

ally, and while the changes made will introduce novelty into the 
week they were not introduced for the sake of novelty itself, but 
because we felt that the occasion would be strengthened and our 
visitors pleased. 



— The lessons taught us by Centennial Week showed that our 
visitors can be comfortably entertained, if we know in advance of 
the intention of our friends to be present. We therefore invite 
patrons and alumnae who contemplate a trip to Salem in May to 
notify us at once in regard to their plans, and their special desires 
in connection with entertainment, and we will try to so arrange 
matters as to make every one comfortable. 



— The Oxford cap and gown for Commencement is the most 
dignified and appropriate costume which a graduate can possibly 
wear. Hence, we urge patrons to unite with us in discouraging 
undue display in die matter of dress in connection with Commence- 
ment Week. 



— A series of Musical Recitals of more than ordinary interest 
have been and are being given on the afternoons of the Saturdays 
in March and April. The first was a Recital by Prof. Shirley, 
the second was by Miss Jeter, and the third the Graduating Reci- 
tal of Miss Lichtenthaler. The music rendered on these occa- 
sions is of an order not usually heard in schools, and in its grade 
would be an honor to any conservatory. The musical department 
of our College is unusually strong this year, and the position of 
leadership which we have held for so many years is still our proud 
boast. 



— The Conference for Education in the South will be held in 
Richmond, Va. , April 22-24, 1903. This is the same organization 
which met in our College two years ago. Among other exercises 
will be a memorial service in honor of the recently deceased Dr. 
J. L. M. Curry. 



2360 The Academy. 

The Story of the Trees. 



BY DR. CLEWELL. 



How seldom do we think of trees as having a history. We 
speak of the history of towns, of buildings, of -events, but not of 
trees. Why not ? The trees grow from tiny twigs to giant size ; 
they are green in summer, casting their pleasant shade ; they are 
bare in winter but do not obstruct the welcome sunshine. They 
are trained and trimmed, they have their ills and their enemies, and 
their struggles for life and death, as is, at present, the case of the 
great English elm in front of Main Hall. Then, too, the trees are 
intimately associated with men and events, as can readily be seen 
by an examination of some of the fine old specimens in Winston- 
Salem. The tendency of growth in size of our larger towns and 
cities relegates the trees to parks and public squares, but in smaller 
towns the welcome shade tree will everywhere find its place. 

Without touching upon the historic trees of other States, asso- 
ciated with some of the leading events of history, we can in our own 
section recall many trees which have disappeared, or are disappear- 
ing, or are in the zenith of their beauty, all of which have their inter- 
esting histories. 

Many readers of The Academy will remember the rows of 
great sycamores which extended from the old Butner Hotel to the 
Salem Creek. The church records note carefully when these trees 
were planted, and hundreds of pupils received their first impressions 
of Salem as they drove along this avenue to the hotel and to the 
College buildings. Now every vestige of this once imposing growth 
has disappeared. 

Every visitor to Salem has noticed the giant sycamores in the 
square. For generations they have spread their great limbs over 
the green sward, but during the past months one and another has 
succumbed to the ravages of a very small insect with a very long 
name and have been cut down. 

A particularly hard struggle was made by the English elm. 
This tree, it is said, was sent over from England, and was brought 
to Salem by Congressman A. H. Shepherd. Its size and symmetry 
were admired by all, but the elm beetle attacked it, and though 
some life remains, it is probable this beautiful tree will soon have 
to be removed. 



The Academy. 2361 

Perhaps the trees which have given more pleasure than any 
others are the cedars in the avenue and the Moravian graveyard. 
Many of them, planted soon after the beginning of Salem, have 
grown to immense size, and Cedar Avenue has become famous for 
its beauty. But even these have their limit of growth, and the 
storms of the past winter have blown down about a dozen of the 
largest and finest. After one storm five or six of these great cedars 
lay prostrate over the graves, and the scene was one of pitiful deso- 
lation. The only conclusion which can be arrived at is the fact 
that these great trees, planted by our forefathers, and giving pleas- 
ure to generations, have lived their allotted time, and we of this 
generation must plant for our children to enjoy. While the beauty 
of the avenue and graveyard is not seriously injured, with the four 
great central trees gone, the spot will always present a different 
appearance to this generation. 

About the school itself there are various historic trees. The 
Bishop Jacobson trees, west of Society Hall, have disappeared, 
having died some years ago. The DeSchweinitz willow tree stands 
in the quadrangle ' east of Main Hall, and in the Salem square are 
trees towering high in air, at which the late Mr. Augustus Fogle 
would look and remark : ' ' Those I helped to plant. ' ' 

A Class tree stands beside the deer park. A short time since 
the members of the class had a reunion, and it was a beautiful sight 
to see the happy group as they laughed and chatted beneath the 
shade of the tree they had planted some years before. A few days 
ago the news of the death of a lovely young wife reached us, and 
we will never forget how she stood beneath this class tree, one of 
the happiest of the company. Thus this class tree is making his- 
tory already, though one of the youngest of the family of monarchs 
in our park forest. 

A pleasant feature of the approaching commencement will be 
the ceremony of planting the ' ' Class Tree, ' ' which in its turn will 
grow and gather about it the history which, if written, would be as 
interesting, no doubt, as that of buildings or individuals. 

Following the thought that trees have a beginning and end to 
their lives, we have been replanting in various portions of the cam- 
pus. Twenty-five fine young shade trees were placed in position 
last year, and this year twenty-five handsome evergreen trees were 
presented to the School by Dr. Bahnson, and have been carefully 
placed so as to give the most pleasure as they grow. 



2362 The Academy 

From the above it will be seen that our statement is true. 
Trees have their history, and if each reader will, in imagination, go 
back to the home of her childhood, she can add to this list indefi- 
nitely, recalling the trees which mingled their shade or their fruits 
with the pleasures of her early days. And if all these stories were 
told our sketch would become a volume. 



(JTottespontiencc. 

FROM ALUMNAE AND OTHER FRIENDS 



All communications for this Department should he addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N. C Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
from former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



— Miss Elsie Bahnson is making a success of her work in 
Linden Hall, Lititz, Pa. , and we quote from a recent letter : 

' ' Your kind assistance in regard to my book-keeping affairs 
was greatly appreciated by me, and I want to thank you very 
much for it. I have written to the firm whose address you gave 
me, but I would also be glad to have some of Miss Shaffner's 
cards to aid me in having a set printed. She has already sent me 
a check of the Academy bank, and I think it would be quite a 
praiseworthy effort to start such an institution at Linden Hall. 

' ' My stay here at Linden Hall has been made very pleasant so 
far, and I enjoy my work thoroughly. At the same time I am 
often back at the Academy in my thoughts, and receive all informa- 
tion about its welfare eagerly, especially in regard to our Class Me- 
morial. The Academy keeps me posted on many things, and my 
sister also faithfully reports all interesting events of her school lffe, 
so that my school-day friends and adventures are kept fresh in my 
memory. 

' ' Lititz also reminds me of Salem in many respects, and the 
Lititz people are as kind and hospitable as the Salem folks. But 
talking about Salem always makes me forgetful of everything else 
and I really must stop before I tire you. 

' ' Please remember me to all my old teachers, and give my 
love especially to Mrs. CLEWELL. I was so happy to see her when 
she recently visited Lititz. Thanking you again for your kindness, 
" I am, sincerely yours, 

" Elsie Bahnson." 



The Academy. 2363 

* My dear Mr. Clewell and Academy Friends : 

' ' Best wishes for a happy New Year from one of the ' ' Texas' ' 
girls. 

' ' It has been so long since I have written to any of you that 
I suppose an introduction is in order. 

"I enjoy The Academy very much, but see that many 
changes have taken place since I left, but the ' ' Hesperian ' ' edito- 
rial staff has some familiar names in it. Of course, I am especially 
interested in this society. 

' ' Since I have assumed the duties of a ' school marm ' things 
on the outside sometimes are overlooked, and among other things 
was my subscription to The Academy, which you will find enclosed 
in this letter. 

" Remember me to Miss Lehman, Mr. Pfohl, Prof. Shirley, 
Dr. Rondthaler, and all the other teachers, also love to Mrs. 
Clewell, I am, 

' ' Very sincerely, 

"Daisy D. Collum, 

" Corsicana, Tex., Jan. 12, zgoj." 

"The Academy : 

' ' I hardly recognized your little paper in its pretty white cover. 
Enclosed please find 50 cents for renewal of subscription. My ab- 
sence from home must be my apology for not attending to it sooner. 
My recollections of the school, and those connected with it, will 
always be pleasant to me, and I have been much interested in read- 
ing of the exercises during the Centennial, and of those collected to 
celebrate it ; also of the great progress you are making in your 
school. "Very respectfully, 

" Mrs. Virginia Swift. 

" Downington, Pa., Jan. ij, ipoj." 



— Miss Mina Lou Blount, representing the Student Volunteer 
Movement for Foreign Missions, visited the school and addressed 
the pupils on Wednesday, March 18, in the Young People's Meet- 
ing;. Her address was" heard with marked interest. 



2364 ,The Academy. 

Salem, Seasickness and Other Sensations. 



BY REV. H. E. RONDTHALER. 



Most of us had been dismally seasick during well-nigh twenty- 
four hours, for that miserable little steamer from Haifa to Constan- 
tinople was afflicted with a wretchedly disagreeable roll, terminating 
in a shuddering shiver, which shook the boat from end to end 
every time a long swell lifted her stern clear of the water, and sent, 
or rather permitted, the screw propeller for a few minutes to fly 
whizzing around in space. 

If never before we knew then the appropriateness of the old 
lines : 

" Man wants but little here below, 
Nor wants that little long." 

Our stateroom was one of the six-berthed variety, and every 
berth was occupied, but with that ' ' don' t-care-a-cent ' ' feeling which 
is so striking a symptom of mal de mer, we had not concerned our- 
selves in -the slightest degree with one another, and to all intents 
and purposes we were total strangers although near neighbors in 
misery. 

Each had troubles of his own. 

It must have been about nine o'clock of the second morning, 
as I was lying flat on my back, vacantly gazing up at the same 
identical cracks in the same identical stateroom ceiling, which I had 
been contemplating ever since the voyage began, when a dismal 
sound began to groan its way from out an opposite lower berth : 

" Oh — , oh — , oh — me, gee-whiz !" 

It was such a delightfully familiar, and an altogether wretched 
ejaculation that I lifted my head three or four inches in order to 
discover the originator thereof. Now it reads like a very simple 
matter to lift one's head three or four inches, but any one who has 
ever been seasick knows what an heroic effort this apparently trifling 
act implies. All that I could distinguish as I leaned over the edge 
of my upper berth was the back of a towsled head, buried deeply 
and dejectedly in the pillow. 

For a time everything was still. Then there issued once more 
from those seasick depths the melancholy 



The Academy 2365, 

" Oh — oh — oh — , gee-whiz !'"' 

" Hello," said I, " that sounds familiar." 

' ' Hello, ' ' came back the dismal answer. 

' ' Speak English. 

"Yes." 

" How do you feel?" I inquired sympathetically. 

" Don't feel, too seasick," responded he of the towsled head. 

As this last remark seemed to threaten an untimely end to our 
conversation I tried a new tack : 

" American ?" 

"Yes." 

"What part?" ■ 

" South." 

" So am I.' ' 

" Good," came back the prompt answer from the pillow depths,, 
in a tone evidencing about one-eighth of a degree of enthusiasm.. 
Encouraged by this first sign of interest I ventured : 

"What State?" 

' ' Tennessee. ' ' 

" That's fine. We're neighbors. I'm from North Carolina." 

A long silence, not from lack of interest, but because both of 
us were occupied with affairs relating to the Department of the- 
Interior. 

After a while my unknown companion in misery inquired : 

' ' Say, did you ever hear of a town called Salem ?' ' 

" What !" said I, sitting bolt upright in my berth, (I regretted, 
that afterwards,) " Salem ! That's my home-place." 

"Well, now, that's interesting. Isn't there a famous old. 
school for girls in Salem. ' ' 

"Yes, indeed, said I, "you mean Salem Female Academy." 

" Sure. Do you know anything about it?"' 

" Do I ? Why, I've lived next door to it for twelve years." 

"Well, then, we're the next thing to being well acquainted," 
said he, as he rolled over and disclosed the pale but smiling face of 
a young man some 20 or 21 years of age. 

"You see," he continued, "I've got the finest little cousin, 
over there at Salem Academy, and, if all she says is true, Salem is 
one place I propose to see if I ever get out of this wretched Medi- 
terranean alive. ' ' 



2366 The Academy. 

We shook hands across the stateroom for the sake of old 
Salem six thousand miles away. 

A few hours later his party left the steamer to journey eastward. 
I've never seen him again, but one thing I know, Salem is a good 
town to stand by wherever you may be. 



personal Etems. 



— Several members of our Academy family, Annie McKinney, 
Annie Walker, Eva Harris and Mary Watlington have 
been saddened by the death of Mrs. Maud Harris Brooks, late 
of Reidsville, N. C. 

As a pupil of the Academy Mrs. Brooks was known and loved 
for her unfailing sweetness of disposition and kindly unselfishness. 
These traits as well as others endeared her to a large and influential 
circle of friends, and her death has left an aching void that cannot 
well be filled. The world is better and brighter for such lives and 
when the Heavenly Gardener transplants them to the vales of Para- 
dise we follow them with longing, tear-dimmed eyes. 



Jfflarrien. 



Pfohl — Hege. — On Jan. 28, 1903 Mr. Samuel F. Pfohl to Miss 
Elma Hege, both of Salem, N. C. 

Our best wishes go with the young couple. 

Dobson — Palmer. — On Feb. 25, 1903, in Augusta, Ga., Mr. Charles 
Reese Dobson to Miss Hallie Estelle Palmer, 

At home after April 1st, No. 603, Telfair St., Augusta, Ga. 

Walters — Rawley.— On March 25, 1903, Mr. Thomas L. Walters to 
Miss Kate Rawley. of West 5th Street, Winston. N. C. 



IBtcU. 



Brooks.— On Mar. T4, 1903, in Greensboro, N. C , Mrs. Maud Harris 
Brooks. 



The Academy. . 2367 

Our Sesqui-Centennial, 1753--1903. 



BY E. A. LEHMAN. 



It was a dark November day, in Seventeen fifty-three 
When, just at eve, a stalwart band were gathered wearily : 
All travel-stained and worn they came to these Wachovia Hills, 
To found a home, a brotherhood, beside its flowing rills. 
The leaden sky above them bent in benediction rare, 
As in Hans Wagner's cabin rude arose their evening prayer. 
Their lullaby that stormy night was the fierce panther's cry ; — 
Like some lost spirit's eerie shriek, the howling wolf crept by. 
But safe as bird in quiet nest, sheltered, secure from harms, 
Around them and beneath were spread the Everlasting arms. 

No peaceful homes, no busy mills, no sprouting corn were there, 
But Desolation's wildest fugues played through the wintry air. 
The storm-king's banners proudly spread were flaunting fierce 

and high, 
And levin bolts came crashing across the darkening sky. 
But God — our fathers' God, — -was there, — the same for us and ours, 
And guarded them, as he guards us, in danger's trying hour. 
They labored long and patiently, laid their foundations deep, 
And we, in Nineteen-hundred-three, their faithful sowing reap. 
We hear it in the busy hum of countless shops and mills ; 
We see it in the bending grain of fertile fields and hills ; 
We prize it in the treasured lore of Academic halls, — 
Which for a century has shone forth from our College walls. 
We hail it in the Liberty so highly prized by them, 
Which echoes from the mountain top to each sequestered glen. 

'Tis right to do them honor, and to their memory twine 
Our fadeless wreaths of laurel, of cypress, and of pine ; 
To raise our grateful columns, in this Centennial year, 
And in a three-fold jubilee honor their memory dear. 
They wrought in faith and patience on an oft-times weary road, 
But they gained a welcome entrance to the presence of their God ; 
There, free from toil and sorrow, they've joined the white-robed band, 
' Mid the uncreated brightness of the glorious Heavenly Land. 
But we who still are treading the rugged paths of life, 
Should bear ourselves as nobly in its daily stress and strife ; 
Should fill our days with action, from busy sun to sun, 
Till for us, too, the eventide shall bring our Lord's 
Well Done ! 

— From the Sentinel. 



2368 . The Academy. 

John Henry Boner. 



The death of Mr. John Henry Boner took from us a man of 
unusually fine gifts and powers. He was born in Salem, and spent 
a portion of his life here. At an early age he showed his ability as 
a writer, and some of his poems, written during the time of the 
Civil War, received very favorable comment and attracted much 
attention. He, later, moved to other sections, residing in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and New York city, where he spent much of his 
time in literary labors. His poetry has been printed in book form, 
and a number of them relate to his native section. The one which 
we give below describes the well known Cedar Avenue and Mora- 
vian Graveyard : — 

HOW OFT I'VE TROD THAT SHADOWY WAY. 



Full many a peaceful place I've seen, 
But the most restful spot I know 
Is one where thick dark cedars grow- 
In an old graveyard cool and green. 

The way to the sequestered place 

Is arched with boughs of that sad tree, 
And there the trivial step of glee 

Must sober to a pensive pace. 

How oft I've trod that shadowy way 
In bygone years — sometimes while yet 
The grass with morning dew was wet, 

And sometimes at the close of day, 

And sometimes when the summer noon 
Hung like a slumbrous midnight spell — 
Sometimes when through the dark trees fell 

The sacred whiteness of the moon. 

Then is the hour to wander there, 

When moonlight silvers tree and stone, 
And in the soft night wind is blown 

Ethereal essence subtly rare. 

At such an hour the angels tread 

That hallowed spot in stoles as white 
As lilies, and in silent flight. 

They come and qx> till dawn is red. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 

L. Pauline Sessoms— Editor-in-chief. 
Mary B. Gudger — Assistant Editor. 
Frances Powers— Exchange Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby— Literary Editor. 
Corinne Baskin— Business Manager. 



IE tutorial. 



—As the first days of Spring approach and the sun shines 
down on us in gladness, the only danger that threatens is the alarm- 
ing increase and spread of the ' ' hook-bug ' ' over the country. 
This insect, 

' ' Which has no wings at all 
But gets there just the same," 

seems to be making its presence felt, though, as yet, none of our 
number have experienced a severe attack. 

The virulent laziness, which is the first symptom of the disease 
caused by the ' ' hook-bug, ' ' may be easily recognized ; so, if its 
presence is detected in the slightest degree, let us use all our energy 
to prevent an epidemic, for it is now a known fact that the disease 
called ' ' unciniriasis ' ' will eventually prove fatal. 



— A man who has given something new to the American pub- 
lic, namely, "American Humor," is George Ade, a native of the 
State of Indiana. 

His great achievement has been to draw, with wit and humor, 
the characteristics which belong to every American family. 

He is a young man, and promises so much for the future that 
hejs eminently an American of to-morrow. 



2370 The Euterpean 

A Few Points of Interest in New York City. 



New York, like all other cities of note, has many points of 
interest in it. Sight-seers can be kept busy for days enjoying its 
buildings, parks and drives. 

In Wall Street and its vicinity are many buildings which 
are interesting. Among these are the Post Office, Stock Exchange 
and City Hall. Further up town is a magnificent edifice, con- 
structed in the shape of a flat-iron. In it are a number of beautiful 
offices. 

The Supreme Court building is one of the handsomest in the 
city. Just opposite this is Madison Square Garden. 

New York's churches are magnificent structures. Every one 
enjoys seeing old Trinity Church, Grace, St. Thomas, St. Barthol- 
omew, the Cathedral, and the Christian Science Temple. 

A drive up Fifth Avenue will reveal a panorama of beauty and 
of interest. Starting from Washington Park, the beginning of 
Fifth Avenue proper, the observer may see the Park itself with its 
arch ; Washington Square, lined with its handsome residences ; Jud- 
son Memorial Church, to the south of the Square, and Fifth Ave- 
nue, with its beautiful homes on either side of its wide pavements. 
The business portion is from Fourteenth to Thirty-fourth Streets. 
Then the Waldorf-Astoria, Delmonico's and Sherry's are to be 
seen, as well as the dwellings of some of the wealthiest and most 
influential families of the citv. At Fifty-ninth Street, Central Park 
begins and extends to One Hundred and Tenth Street. A building 
of note in the Park is the Metropolitan Museum of Art. A visit to 
this Museum will be enjoyable as well as beneficial. 

Of New York's drives the one through Central Park, Morning- 
side and Riverside is the most beautiful. Grant's tomb is on River- 
side Drive ; not very far from this is Columbia College, beyond 
which is the magnificent library belonging to that College. 

Bronx Park should be visited by all sight-seers. Most of the 
animals have been taken from Central Park to the Bronx, where 
they are more roomily and, therefore, more comfortably housed. 

No tourist, of course, would think of leaving New York with- 
out having crossed the Brooklyn Bridge. 

These are but some of the attractions of our great metropolis]; 
experience of thousands of its visitors has shown it to be deserving 
of its excellent reputation. 



The Euterpean. 2371 

The Pilgrim's Jubillee. 



AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY. 



The twenty-fifth anniversary of the coronation of Pope Leo> 
was celebrated on the sixth day of March. The sacred edifices and 
many private houses were brilliantly illuminated, and throughout 
the city Bengal fires were burned in commemoration of the event. 

At eleven o'clock the bell of St. Peter's rang out, and then 
five hundred other bells proclaimed to all Rome that the Pope was- 
on his way to the basilica. The ceremony was performed within 
St. Peter's, with all due solemnity. The aged pontiff bore the- 
fatigue of the day admirably well. 

This magnificent scene brings with it memories of the Pilgrims' 
Jubilee of 1900, when thousands of enthusiastic pilgrims flocked 
from far and wide to obtain the pontificial benediction. 

The massive cathedral of St. Peter's seems at ordinary times 
to be almost empty, though there may be hundreds of persons pass- 
ing up and down its spacious aisles, but, on a certain October day, 
nearly three years ago, the body of the church was crowded with, 
men, women and children of every rank and station in life, one and 
all animated with the same ardent desire to behold the Pope and. 
receive his blessing. 

Kneeling on the cold stone floor, the brown-eyed peasant girl 
silently offered her prayer, and the Dominican friar bent low over 
his rosary. A group of devotees worshipped at the shrine of ' ' Our 
Lady," and farther on a pious Sister from some neighboring con- 
vent reverently murmured her daily devotions. 

Here and there an agile lad or two had clambered to the top 
of a confessional and gazed in wonder at the multitude of heads 
below. 

Some weary souls brought with them camp stools., and from 
their comfortable resting places compassionately regarded their less 
fortunate companions. Now and then some rude youth would 
roughly elbow his way through the crowd in search of a better place 
from which to see the Pope enter the sanctuary. 

Scattered about among the multitude were numerous groups 
of peasants in holiday attire. The girls, clad in short skirts of blue 
or red protected by aprons of some bright hue,, their bodices laced,. 



:2372 The Euterpean. 

with scarlet or yellow, and their dark tresses hidden beneath their 
multi-colored kerchiefs, whispered among themselves or stare'd 
curiously at the many strangers in the church. The young men 
with their gay hose wrapped round with ribbons and their soft, 
broad-brimmed hats held tightly in their hands, listened half-amus- 
edly and half-impatiently to the maiden's remarks. 

Suddenly, a body of soldiers, composed chiefly of -the Swiss 
Guards, ordered the great assembly to separate in two sections so 
that a passage might be made in the centre of the church down 
which the Pope might pass on his way to the high altar. Soon a 
door communicating with the Vatican was thrown open and the 
venerable pontiff, seated in the Sedia Gestatoria, borne upon the 
shoulders of four cardinals in their crimson vestments proceeded 
down the aisle. 

A mighty cheer rose from the assemblage. Then the cardinals, 
priests and pilgrims in the procession which followed the papal 
chair, raised their voices in jubilant song. 

The Pope, again and again extending his almost transparent 
hand, pronounced the benediction; His snow-white hair, his deli- 
cate features and his flowing white robes made him appear more 
like a spirit than a human being. 

At length the altar was reached. The Pope descended from 
his chair, assisted by the attendant cardinals, and the mass began. 

After the service once more he took his place on the Sedia 
Gestatoria and was carried out of the cathedral. 



Favor German Given by the Sixth Room. 



The Sixth Room girls gave a ' ' Favor German ' ' in the gymna- 
sium on Tuesday night, Feb. 24th. It proved to be a brilliant 
success. . 

The german was skilfully led by Misses Stafford and Jeter, 
• and many pretty and odd figures were introduced and enjoyed. 

The dancing continued until late, and then the conples re- 
tried to the Sixth Room, where most delicious refreshments were 
served. 



The Euterpean. 2373 



MARY B. GUDGER. 



— Since the New Year began the Society meetings have been 
equally as enteriaining as they were before. The programs have 
all been carefully prepared and have been humorous as well as 
highly literary. 

On January 16th .a Tennyson evening was enjoyed. Each 
member answered to the roll call' with a Tennyson quotation, and 
two of his most interesting poems were read. 

On Friday evening, January 23d, a musical contest had been 
prepared, a medley was played, during which time the girls were 
kept busy guessing the different pieces rendered. Miss Eva Har- 
ris won the first prize, which was a piece of music entitled " Please 
go 'way and let me sleep." The booby was won by Miss Ruth 
Willingham, — it was a pen wiper, and on it was written : "All 
TUNES sound alike to 'me. ' ' 

A book party was also enjoyed— each girl came to represent 
the name of a book. The girls all took much interest in this, and 
so the evening was a pleasant one. The prize was won by Miss 
Bess Warren. 



— One of the most delightful entertainments of the season was 
the reception given by the Freshman to the Seniors, Monday even- 
ing, Feb. 23d. 

The Gymnasium was transformed into a beautiful reception 
hall, which was artistically decorated in red, white and blue. Flags 
were predominant. 

The most interesting feature of the evening was a game. Each 
guest was given a card with a ' ' wiggle ' ' on it. They were then 
told to draw something relating to George Washington. This 
gave the artists, as well as those not so inclined, an excellent oppor- 
tunity to display their talents. Among the drawings would be 
noticed cherry trees, cherries, George Washington's portrait(?), 
hatchets, flags, and even George Washington himself was depicted 
in the act of cutting down a cherry tree with his little hatchet. 

Miss Lehman was the happy recipient of a very pretty gold 



2374 The Euterpean. 

and pearl-handled pen. Miss Lita Young won the consolation 
prize, a box of crystalized cherries. 

The evening' s fun was closed with the old-time ' ' Virginia 
reel," which was in keeping with the entertainment. 

To the Freshmen we are indebted for one of the most novel 
entertainments that we have had|the pleasure to enjoy. 

IHKijange department. 

FRANCIS POWERS. 



— The oration on ' ' David Livingstone, ' ' in the Doane Owl 
gives us a vivid sketch of the man whom all loved and admired. 
This exchange contains some interesting articles. 

We were glad to receive the Linden Hall Echo. ' ' Ways of 
Rising " is a bright poem. 

— The Mirror tells us of some very instructive musicals and 
social evenings. 

— The Guilford Collegian has some good articles. 



— Throughout the rural districts of Berks county, Pa:, they 
have a custom of "boiling soap," the apparatus which can usually 
be seen at any outhouse. While thus engaged on one occasion, a 
farmer's daughter saw her swain approaching, and immediately 
started for the house to better her appearance, which fact the 
mother explained to the caller as he came upon the scene. After 
a while the girl appeared, all traces gone of a few moments before 
whereupon the enamored youth said : 

' ' Why, you look as though you had never seen any soap. ' ' 



— Little Charlie (at supper) : "Grandma, do your glasses 
make things look bigger?" 

Grandma : " " Yes, dearie. Why ?' ' 

Charlie: "Oh, I only thought if they did I'd lfke to take 
'em off while you're cutting the cake." — Scattered Seeds. 



"Small Boy: "I got two lickings to-day, one from pa and 
one from ma." Big Boy : " Yes ; they are a spanking team." 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Katie M. Kilbuck— Editor-in-chief. 
Sadie M. Rollins— Assistant Editor. 
Adah A. Petway — Literary Editor. 
Florence Moorman — Exchange Editor. 
Louise F. Harper— Business Manager: 



lEfoitorial department. 

— The eyes of the world are looking upon Macedonia, at pres- 
ent. The Turkish government has become so overbearing that 
their tyranny is almost unendurable. A situation may arise in 
Macedonia similar to that in Armenia several years ago. We will 
watch the movements of the Macedonians with intense interest, and 
will hope for no disastrous results of the present uprising. 



— Americans, especially American women, will be glad to hear 
that the reports concerning Queen Wilhelmina and the ' ' man of 
her choice ' ' are false and that these false reports are being rectified 
rapidly. 

After searching down to the root of the matter it was found 
that these rumors had been circulated by a discharged attache, who 
sought to carry out his. revenge in this manner. 



— The authorities of the Great Round World wish, with the 
issue June 6, 1903, to change the name of the magazine. The per- 
son sending the best name is to have $250.00. The requirements 
of the new name are given in the March 7 number. Here's a 
chance, girls, to make a snug little sum ! Put your thinking caps 
on and send in a suggestion. 



2376 The Hesperian. 



The Death of Martha Elizabeth Harris. 



The death of Martha Elizabeth Harris was such a shock 
to all because of her superabundant vitality and liveliness. We 
always associated life, joy and hope with her, and loved and es- 
teemed her, not only as a companion and fellow-worker in society, 
but as our Vice President of 1901-1902. 

A surgical operation, which at first, seemed very favorable, 
took an unexpected turn and before we of the Academy were aware 
of her danger, she was gone, — gone in the very bloom of her beauty, 
just graduated in May and beginning to enjoy the pleasures of 
young womanhood. 

How forcibly this brings to our minds the words of the sacred 

poet : — 

" Then, joyous youth, hence learn how soon 
Thy years may take their flight 
Long, long before life's brilliant noon 
May come death's gloomy night." 

The numerous floral offerings showed the love borne to the 
departed one and sympathy felt for the stricken family and friends. 

Some of the Academy girls together, with other friends from 
town, carried the floral tributes. Other members of the Senior 
Class attended the impressive service in the Episcopal Church. 

K. M. K. 



A Delightful Reception. 



Among the many social events of the past month we might say 
■that the most unique and enjoyable one was that planned and most 
successfully carried out by the officers and members of the Euter- 
pean Society for the entertainment of the members of their sister 
society, The Hesperian. 

At eight o' clock the happy company gathered in the tasttily 
decorated chapel. Here Jean Ingelow's poem, " Songs of Seven" 
was so well acted that beauty was added to the already beaut- 
iful work of our beloved poet. Those who contributed to our enjoy- 
ment were : 



The Hesperian. 2377 

Seven Times One, Exultation, Miss Kathleen Tay. 

Seven Times Two, Romance, Miss Mary McMurray. 

Seven Times Three, Love, Miss Bess Warren. 

Seven Times Four, Maternity, Miss Pauline Sessoms. 

Seven Times Five, Widowhood,. Miss Emma Aird. 

Seven Times Six, Giving in Marriage, ... Miss Lita Young. 

Tableau, Bride, .Miss Mary B. Gudger. 

Groom, Mr. John H. Clewell, Jr. 

Minister, Miss Annie L. Walker. 

Seven Times Seven, Longing for Home, Miss Fltzabeth Bowdon. 
Music by Miss Eva Harris. 

After this rendition a ' ' social half-hour ' ' was most delightfully 
spent, and a dainty supper served. In due time we reluctantly 
bade our charming hostesses ' ' good night. ' ' 



Twice-Written Thoughts. 



"Great minds run in like channels", some one has rightly 
said. Quotations are to be the means that we will use to bring to 
the reader's mind the truth of the above statement. 

It never rains but what it pours," is one way of saying "When 
troubles come they come not single spies, but in battalions." An- 
other version of this thought given us by Shakespeare is 

" One woe doth seem to tread upon another's heels 
So fast they follow. ' ' 

However ' ' fast they follow ' ' let us bear them bravely. God 
controls our destinies we know, but our surroundings we make for 
ourselves. For so Milton and Shakespeare tell us when in different 
words they express the same thought. Milton, when he writes : 
' ' The mind is its own place, and of itself can make a heaven of hell, 
a hell of heaven." And Shakespeare, when, in Hamlet, he writes : 
" There's nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so." 

Even death itself is not terrifying to the Christian. Just as 
Wordsworth describes our birth as " A sleep and a forgetting, ' ' 
and goes on to say that, 

' ' Trailing clouds of glory do we come 
From God who is our home. ' ' 

So he further states that, after death, the soul returns to God. 



2378 The Hesperian. 

Surely then we should not dread death ; for, as another great mind 
has expressed it, 

' ' Death is but a covered bridge 
Leading from light to light through a brief darkness. ' ' 

Stained glass windows have been beautifully described by two 
poets of note. The one speaks of them as 

' ' Storied windows richly dight 
Casting a dim, religious light." 

The other says that they are 

" Innumerable of stains and splendid dyes 
As the tiger-moths deep damasked wings. ' ' 

Leaving the thoughts of poets for a moment we turn to prose. 
In The Letters of a Self-Made Merchant to His Son, the father 
writes : ' ' the higher a man climbs the plainer he is seen. ' ' To 
return to poetry this thought is treated in this way : ' ' Uneasy lies 
the head that wears a crown." Tennyson's mind must have been 
running in that channel when he speaks of ' ' the fierce, white light 
that beats about a throne. 

Whether we are among the more plainly seen persons of this 
world, or whether we are those who, less closely observed, pursue 
the even tenor of their way, if we labor earnestly to improve our 
talents, be they few or many, the Master's "Well done !" at last 
will mean to us, whoever we are, a life of never ending, of perfect 
happiness. 

burner. 



— A new rendering of the old adage, ' ' Honest confession is 
good for the soul," by one of our brilliant specials, is "Free ad- 
mission is good for the soul. 

— One of our girls, when asked to compose a piece of poetry 

quickly responded by the following lines : 

" A man had a gun," 
He shot at a rabbit, 
But he didn't kill none." 



The Hesperian. 2379 

" Chem." 



Half afraid, half dismayed, 
Half disheartened, onward, 
All into the Hall of Tests 
Marched the half-hundred. 
' ' Forward the Senior Class, 
Ready for the ' chems,' " she said. 
Then, into the jaws of death, 
Marched the half-hundred. 

When ' ' ready for ' chems' ' ' was said, 
Was there a girl dismayed ? 
Altho' each girl well knew 
Some one would blunder. 
Theirs not to reply, 
Theirs not to reason "why" (?). 
Theirs but to do and sigh : 
' ' Chemistry is all awry. ' ' 

Questions on the paper, 
Answers in their minds, 
Symbols and mol. weights 

Alloyed and fumed, 
Stormed at with properties 

Of H, O, N and C. 
Carefully they wrote and well (?) 
On the sheets of yellow. 
Onward till the noon-day, 
Wrote the half-hundred. 

When will the quiz be o'er ? 
Oh, the wild charge they made, 
Every one wondered. 
Hojior the charge they made ! 
Honor the Senior Class / 
Noble half -hundred ! 



— The Freshmen entertained the Seniors the night of Feb. 23, 
and a most delightful evening was spent. 

— The Sixth Room girls gave a Favor German, Friday even- 
ing, Feb. 24th, to quite a number of friends. 

— We are glad to have Ethel Corbin with us again. She 
has been spending several months in Cuba. 



2380 The Hesperian. 

ISxcljange department. 

FLORENCE MOORMAN. 

— The Austin College Reveille is one of our best exchanges. 
The February issue contains several short stories, among which 
' ' The Hero of Old 41 " is worthy of especial mentfon. 

— The Alpha is a very good literary paper. In the last issue 
we find sketches of Jean Ingelow, William Wordsworth, Walt Whit- 
man and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. We read the sketch of Jean 
Ingelow with much interest as we have just reached the nineteenth 
century in our Society Literary work. 

— We are always glad to welcome The Crimson to our Ex- 
change table. The February issue of this paper is given princi- 
pally to local items. 

— In The Comenian we find a very interesting story, entitled 
"An Incomplete Experiment in Higher Education. " The Exchange 
Department of this paper is exceedingly good. 

— We acknowledge with pleasure the Linden Hall Echo from 
Lititz, Pa. 

— We are all very much interested in the Book Lover, a 
new magazine that has recently made its appearance in our college 
home. This is a young magazine, having been published only 
three years, but it contains many interesting and generally unknown 
facts about the World's Literature. It is published by the Book 
Lover Press, 30-32 East 21st St., New York. 

— Prof. H. A. Shirley gave a recital on Saturday afternoon, 
February 7. 

— A recital was given Monday night, Feb. 9, complementary 
to the Y. M. C. A. delegates to the convention which met in Win- 
ston-Salem the beginning of this month. 

— Prof. Holmes, of Elon College, was unfortunate enough to 
loose three of his students while going over the College during the 
Y. M. C. A. Convention, but luck was with the Professor, for he 
soon found them leisurely strolling around the ' ' dining-hall. ' ' 

— The Senior Class sofa pillows have come, and they are 
quite proud of them. 




The Academy. 2381: 

James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Correspondence solicited 



UMm M 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream Puffs, ~\ 20 cts. 
Crescents, Y per 
Cup Cakes, J dozen. 



Vanilla Wafers-, ~) 10 cts. 
Kisses, > per 

Macaroons, ), dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



mw Mm-m^ 



.2382 . The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
•country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed " 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the laigest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston-Salem. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Hade by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2383 

History of Wachovia in North Carolina. 

By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 4.00 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title. 
Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

Read what some of the friends say.- 

Gov. Aycock says : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work well. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not only know more about you 1 people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says : " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academy, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall to many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The book ought to be widely known, not only in Mora- 
vian circles, but to all interested in the history of North Carolina, and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The style is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLBR & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 



2384 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL. 

We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line :>f 

...^.NOTIONS,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-SALEM, IN. C 



The Academy. 2385 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIESAND WEAVES 

that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 

LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

EOSENBACHEES 
DEPARTMENT STOEES. 



2386 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

OAK MIDGE, IT. C. 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H. HOLT, Prins. 

"When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized. Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomely illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 

NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham SchooM902-03 

Located on the Ashtville Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South. 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Oflice/Asheville, N. C 



• MM. 



The Academy. 238T 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBEE, 

TIPSTER, 
CORNICE WORKER 

$0UTg€gn KAILUJAY, 

The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars- 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, F. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N. C. C.P.& T.A.,Ashevllle,N.C 

PRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARDWICK, 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D. C 



:2388 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-\\ riting. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogu3. 

JAS. F. BB.OWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 






YOU 




IF 


WANT 






THE 




' SO 


SHOE 






THAT'S 




SEE 


ALL 






THE 




US 


GO? 






Jf ©©If 1 1 


8 Gl 


m%e.m 


WINSTON 




N. 

— .- 1 .-- Ml 


c. 





HOTEL JOITBS. 

J. L. JONES, laie of Jo ten Fouse, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

-All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best lhal the market a fords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : S;!em Fenia'e Academy. 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol. 26. Winston-Salem, N. C, April, 1903. No. 229. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



lEintotial. 



— The near approach of Commencement has filled the days 
with thoughts and duties connected with that event. ' ' Quiz ' ' 
work and final examination preparations occupy much time and 
attention, and the special departments have entered upon the clos- 
ing concert work. The Senior Class members are busy with the 
preparation of their graduation essays, and those pupils who have 
work to ' ' make up ' ' are using the time to the utmost advantage. 
Altogether it is a season of special effort in every department. 



— We are unable to make an announcement in regard to re- 
duced railroad rates in this issue, but application has been made for 
this courtesy on the part of the railroads, and we request those of 
our readers who will be with us at Commencement to write to us, 
and we will later supply the desired information. 

— The school will this year give to the members of the Alumnae 
Association and to the Patrons a Moravian Lovefeast on the after- 
noon of Alumnae Day. It is believed that this plan will be a pleas- 
ure to the former pupils who were in past years accustomed to 
attend the lovefeasts, and we feel sure our patrons will also find 



2390 The Academy. 

pleasure in participating in this service which, though it is patterned 
after the ' ' agapae ' ' of the Apostles, and is a service also found in 
the Methodist Church, still it has many features which are distinct- 
ively Moravian. Our patrons will please consider this notice a for- 
mal invitation to be present Tuesday afternoon of Commencement 
week in the Moravian Home Church. 



— We are glad to note that Mrs. Clewell is rapidly improv- 
ing. The illness from which she has been suffering was very severe, 
and she has been confined to her room for a long time, but she is 
now rapidly convalescing and her friends hope that she will soon 
be entirely restored. 



— Notice has been received of the death of Mrs. Whiteside, 
in the city of Chattanooga, Tenn. Mrs. Whiteside it will be 
remembered, was the alumna who recently sent to the school a gift 
of one thousand dollars, and who was one of the oldest of the pupils. 
Her name will always be remembered with gratitude in connection 
with her liberal gift, and The Academy extends to all of her friends 
our sympathy in their bereavement. 



— Nov. 17, 1903, one hundred and fifty years will have passed 
since the company of Moravians came to Wachovia to make their 
home in what was then a wilderness. It is proposed to celebrate 
this Sesqui-Centennial occasion in a manner worthy of the event, 
and various committees have been appointed to elaborate the proper 
plans. The place where this first company located is at the present 
site of Bethabara, or, as it is now called, "Old Town," six miles 
north of Salem. 



—It is probable that in no previous year w.as there more inter- 
est in the instruction meetings than was the case this year. They 
were conducted by Bishop Rondthaler, the attendance was en- 
tirely optional, and the numbers present were usually seventy-five 
or more. It is a special opportunity to study the general doctrines 
in which all protestant churches agree. 



The Academy 2391 

— We desire to acknowledge a very liberal gift from Dr. Bahn- 
son to the Infirmary. He had screens placed in all doors and 
windows as a contribution to the comfort of the inmates. Dr. Bahn- 
son has always taken a decided interest in improvements in this 
important department of the school, and it is in part due to his 
advice and counsel that we have the modern, up-to-date hospital 
in which the ills of the school family are cared for in a professional 
manner, and by the influence of which department so many threat- 
ened cases of sickness are warded off. The Academy thanks Dr. 
Bahnson for his liberal donation. 



Easter, 1903. 



One of the most interesting and impressive of the Church festi- 
vals is that of Easter as celebrated by the Moravian Church. There 
is a spirituality and beauty which impress old and young, and when 
once an Easter season has been spent in Salem the person never 
forgets the experience. Very few of the pupils left the Academy 
this year, and the weather was all that could have been desired. 
The music was fine, the various meetings well attended, and the 
sunrise service just as beautiful and impressive as possible. It is 
estimated that from five to six thousand people were present. A 
large number of patrons of the School visited Salem at Easter. 



The Series of Recitals. 



The last in the series of recitals was given April 30 by Miss 
Vest's pupils. This series has been given usually on Saturday 
afternoon, and has become quite a feature of this term. Sometimes 
the programme would be entirely professional, again it would be 
made up of pupils' selections. The Graduation Recitals in Music 
and Elocution also formed a part in the series, and the attendance 
from town and from school was always gratifying ; the occasions 
were private, and the invitations restricted to those actually inter- 
ested in the performers. The special departments are to be con- 
gratulated on the success of these recitals, which show good strong 
work for the year. 



2392 The Academy. 

Commencement. 



Although we last month gave an outline of the plans for Com- 
mencement, the sketch was not quite complete, hence we will in this 
number of The Academy repeat what was said last month and add 
the final plans. 

The time will be from Sunday, May 24th to Wednesday, May 
27th. The Baccalaureate Sermon will be delivered by the Rev. G. 
B. Strickler, D.D., of Richmond, Va. It is hoped that a spec- 
ially interesting service for the evening can be planned, but no 
announcement can be made at this time. 

Monday will be Senior Class Day, and the program for the day 
has been arranged by the pupils. The President of the Class sends 
us the following notice : 

' ' Senior Class Day exercises will take place Monday, May 25. 
The main feature of the morning will be the planting of the Class 
Tree on the Campus by the members of the Graduating Class. The 
ceremony of planting the tree will be accompanied by addresses and 
music. 

" In the afternoon the program will be under the direction of 
Miss Lehman and Prof. Shirley, and will consist of six essays and 
a specially prepared program of music. The Essays are as follows : 

"'The Class History,' by the Class Historian, Miss Sadie 
Rollins, of Asheville, N. C. 

" ' The Planting of the Class Ivy,' by Miss Amy R. Sloan, of 
New York City. 

" 'The Class Prophecy,' by Miss Hannah Dewey, Goldsboro, 
N. C, Miss Adah Aileen Petway, Atlanta, Ga. , and Miss Eliz- 
vbeth Bryan Sloan, New York City. 

" 'The Presentation of the Class Banner,' by Miss Pauline 
Sessoms, Waycross, Ga. The present year is the first in which a 
Class Banner has been hung upon the Chapel walls by a Graduating 
Class." 

The opening musical Concert will be given in the evening. 

The Commencement exercises will be held in the Moravian 
Home church, on Wednesday morning. The address will be deliv- 
ered by JudgeH. G. Connor, of the Supreme Court. The presenta- 
tion of the Diplomas will be by Bishop Rondthaler. 

We will be glad to furnish any information to patrons and 



The Academy. 2393 

friends who contemplate visiting Salem at this time, in regard to the 
journey itself, the arrival of the trains and such matters as hotel and 
boarding house accommodations. 



Memorial Hall. 



Work on the Alumnae Centennial Memorial Hall has been 
begun, and thus the work which has been so carefully considered 
for so long a time is in progress. 

The building will occupy the lot north of the Principal's house, 
and will extend almost to the north wall of the same. During the 
past days the shrubbery, trees and summer house have been 
removed, the green house having been torn down last year to make 
place for the corner-stone laying. 

The excavation for the basement will be in progress by the time 
The Academy reaches our subscribers, and it is proposed to com- 
plete the foundation work during the present summer. 

As the plans contemplate the excavation of the two lots between 
Church and Main Streets the amount of ground to be removed is 
large. This ground will be used to construct terraces on the school 
campus east of Annex Hall, and will not only add to the beauty of 
that portion of the school park but will furnish the pupils with at 
least three more game grounds for lawn tennis and croquet. This 
plan necessitated the removal of the ' ' deer park ' ' to the ' ' pleasure 
grounds ' ' proper, and ' ' Nannie ' ' now has a comfortable home 
between Dr. Bahnson's lily pond and the spring in the school 
park. 

The Principal's House will not be removed during this winter, 
but it is probable that its removal will take place early next Spring. 

Thus it will be seen that the great work has been begun, and 
if it is sucessfully completed it will be the special work of this gener- 
ation, just as Main Hall was the special work of the last generation. 

Memorial Hall will not only be a hall for occasional use, but 
among the plans being considered are the following additions to 
the working space for the school's use : offices, reception _j;'parlor, 
music rooms, laboratories, and, possibly, a gymnasium. These 
latter points will develop as the plans are completed, but it will at 
once be seen that the plans are not for a hall only, but they include 
many needed additions to the school proper. 



281)4 The Academy 

The planting- of the Class Ivy took place some days ago. This 
year the entire school assembled to witness the ceremony. The 
Senior Class marched in procession from their class room to the 
front of Main Hall, and there the Ivy was planted at the pillar south 
of the main entrance. Addresses were made by the Class President, 
Miss Katie Kilbuck, by Miss Lehman, and by Dr. Clewell 
and Bishop Rondthaler. The new Class Banner was carried by 
Miss Pauline Sessoms. The ceremony was beautiful and im- 
pressive. 



The Seniors' Essay Subjects. 



The topics chosen by the Seniors for their Graduating Essays 

are as follows : 

1. The Development of Music Mary Bailey. 

2. The Pyramids of Egypt Hattie Brewer. 

3. Virginia from 1607 to CivilWar Adah Clarke. 

4. Great Men of Virginia Nellie Clark. 

•5. Class Prophecy H. Dewey. 

6. Class Prophecy A. Petway. 

7. Class Prophecy B. Sloan. 

8. Country Life in North Carolina Bessie Crist. 

9. Women of Shakespere May Follin. 

10. Progress in Manufactures Louise Harper. 

1 1 . College Education for the Average Girl B. Hughes. 

12. Transfer of Cap and Gown K. Kilbuck. 

l-'>. Transfer of Cap and Gown C. Ogburn. 

14. Class Poem M. McMixx. 

15. Woman and Her Relation to the Industrial World . L. Reavis. 

10. The Hand of God in History H. Reid. 

17. Class History S. Rollins. 

IS. Effect of Renaissance on Literature B. Russell. 

19. Virginia from 1607 Susie Nunn. 

20. Class Ivy Amy Sloan. 

21. Class Banner , P. Sessoms. 

22. History of North Carolina L. Sessoms. 

28. Ancient and Modern Greece L. Stipe. 

24. Ancient and Modern European Art Stella Shipley. 



The Academy. 2395 

25. The Roman Republic M. Spaugh. 

26. The Antiquities of Egypt J. Stockton. 

27. Resources of North Carolina A. Vest. 

28. Character of Elizabethan Literature L. Vest. 

29. History of North Carolina Metta Watson. 

30. Epic Poetry ' A. Walker. 

31. History of Georgia R. Weslosky. 

32. Development of Literature in the South M. Wood. 

33. North Carolina's First Things Lita Young. 

34. History of Asheville Mattiella Cocke. 

35. The Great Women of the World Grace Hanes. 

36. Rise and Fall of the French Republic Delphine Brown. 

37. Noted Historical Poems Maud Foy. 

Special Literature. 

History of the Moravians Isabel Rice. 

Egyptian Literature Louise Rice. 



Alumnae Association. 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association met on April 
3rd, with three important questions to discuss — the Memorial Hall, 
the awarding of Scholarships for 1903-4, and the program for 
Alumnae Day. 

The Board of Trustees of Salem Academy and College who are 
■charged with the investment of all Funds belonging to the Associa- 
tion, reported that plans for the Memorial Hall had now advanced 
to such a point that work on the foundation for the Hall would be 
actively begun in the course of a few weeks. The amount of money 
in hand is only half enough to build the Hall, but it is believed that 
as the work progresses new interest will be aroused, and the money 
provided. The local Alumnae and their friends are and have been 
straining every nerve to accomplish this, but the Alumnae at large 
have scarcely realized the opportunity here offered to aid their Alma 
Mater, and to erect a Memorial to loved ones who have passed away. 
Contributions will be gladly received by Miss L. C. Shaffner, 
Treasurer of the Alumnae Association, and letters of inquiry in regard 
to suitable individual memorials to be placad in the new Hall may 
be addressed to the Secretary, or to Dr. J. H. Clewell. 



2396 The Academy. 

The Alumnae Sholarship and the Centennial Scholarship were 
awarded for the school year 1903-4, and the names of the young 
ladies will be announced at the Annual Meeting. 

Among the most pleasant memories which pupils of the Acad- 
emy carry away with them is the Moravian Lovefeast, and general 
approval met the suggestion that the Association participate in one 
this year. Dr. Clewell representing the School — which has given 
the annual luncheon complimentary to the Alumnae Association, — 
agreed to substitute a Lovefeast for it this year, and the Executive 
Board therefore makes this announcement : Alumnae Day will be 
celebrated on Tuesday, May 26th, 1903. The annual business meet- 
ing will be held in the Moravian church at three o' clock in the after- 
noon, and will be immediately followed by a Lovefeast, to which all 
the members of the Alumnae Association are invited. No cards of 
invitation will be needed by members of the Association. The 
Grand Concert will be given in the Academy Chapel at 8 P. M., 
and the small admission fee will be for the benefit of the Alumnae 
Fund, according to custom. Adelaide L. Fries, 

Sec'y Alumnce Ass ' n. 



Alumnae Memorial Hall. 



Mrs. E. A. Emerson, $25.00 ; Mrs. H. A. Lemly, $10.00 ; 
Miss Adelaide L. Fries (from sale of souvenir postal cards) $17.25; 
Mrs. George Rights, $5.00; Mrs. F. G. Crutchfield, $1.00; Miss 
Lucile Armfield, $5.00; Mrs. Wilkerson, $5.00. 

Making a total to date of $8546. 70. 

Miss L. C. Shaffner, Secretary. 



For Frame for Pichire, Class Memorial, Class igoi. 

Miss Adelaide Gaither, $1.00; Miss Margaret Smith, $1.00; 
Miss Elmer Fife, $1.00. These personal gifts added to about $13.00 
realized from the sale of ice cream in the school has brought the 
sum to nearly $50.00, which is sufficient to cover the cost of the 
beautiful frame. Miss Emma Smith, the Class President, deserves 
great credit for the special interest given to the collection of the funds 
for picture and for frame. 

— The Trinity Glee Club gave a Concert in the Academy 
Chapel. It was a very enjoyable hour, and after the Concert the 
members of the Club inspected the buildings and grounds. In a let- 
ter received from the Manager he states that the afternoon spent in 
Salem was the most enjoyable part of their tour. 

— Bishop Rondthaler visited Pennsylvania and New England 
during the month of April. 

— The members of the 9th Room made a pleasant trip to Old 
Town recently. 



The Academy. 2397 

(ttorresponijenre. 

FROM ALUMNAE AND OTHER FRIENDS. 



All communications for this Department should be addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N . C Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
fr 'm former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



A few extracts from a letter written to Miss Vogler, by a pupil 
of the long ago, A. Eliza Barr, now Mrs. S. R. Oglesby, of- Hope, 
Ark. , will no doubt be of interest to those who still remember her : 

' ' Some one has been kind enough to send me the September 
and October numbers of The Academy, and I cannot begin to tell 
you how much I have enjoyed them. In the September number 
your name was mentioned, also so many of the dear girls who were 
with me at school there. What a flood of memories has passed 
through my mind since seeing the names of so many whom I loved 
so dearly, and a desire to write to you was irresistible. I have gone 
over every step of the ground in dear old Salem in the last few days, 
especially the street that leads to your home, and dear old Miss 
Chitty's. How I would love to be there again in reality, but I know 
I would find so many changes, it would not seem the same place. 

" I was so glad to hear of Helen deSchweinitz, and the Ma- 
lone sisters, all of whom were my best friends and classmates. My 
oldest son, Micajah, was so interested in The Academy, that he 
at once sent on a subscription for it to be sent to me. I have two 
more boys, aged 14 years, twins, and one daughter, who is now a 
widow. She has a little boy, a bright handsome little fellow of four 
years. They are both at home with me. 

' ' I find my mind reverting back so often to the friends I knew 
and loved in Salem. I entered school in New Orleans after leaving 
Salem, then lived in Jackson, Miss., until I married. Then I lived 
in Mississippi, south of Jackson for about a year, then moved to 
Arkansas where we have lived ever since. There have been some 
shadows in my life, but it has been a happy one. I lost my second 
child very suddenly and it has been the bitterest sorrow of my life. 
My two youngest boys are only children, then there is my grandson 
about four years, so we are a large family. We live in a progressive 
town of about 3,000 inhabitants and have three railroads. 

' ' Nothing would give me more pleasure than to visit Salem again, 
and perhaps Providence may permit it some time in the near future. 
Last night my son came home from a wedding with a spray of Lily- 
of-the-Valley ; how much it reminded me of Salem ; they do not 
grow here, but this came from the bride's bouquet ordered from St.. 
Louis. Affectionately, 

"Anna E. Oglesby.. 

' ' Hope, Ark. 



•2398 The Academy. 

tfljnmicle anti tHosstp. 



— North Carolina is quite too slow in claiming the credit which 
justly belongs to her, and to her gifted children. Now the world 
publishes and believes the statement that Samuel B. Morse, of New 
York, was the actual inventor of the electric telegraph but the real 
inventor was undoubtedly Mr. Julius L. Clemmons, of Clemmons- 
ville, a cousin of our well-known townsman, Mr. E. T. Clemmons, 
later of Asheville, N. C. Mr. Clemmons did not put his discovery 
to practical use, and thus lost the honor which belonged to him by 
right. Mr. J. L. Clemmons is still living in Louisville, Kv. Thus 
in quiet, unpretentious little Clemmonsville, N. C. , was born the 
■originator of the greatest invention of our age. We can only say 
that is just like North Carolina and her children, to do a great thing 
.and then quietly let another State and another person carry off all 
the honors. 

— Again we are called upon to chronicle the departure of an 
esteemed Alumna of the Academy, Mrs. Staley, (better known 
among us as Pauline Hull), of Marion, Va. She was a devout 
member of the Methodist Church and an estimable christian lady. 
She leaves a devoted husband and three sons, Messrs. H. B., Den- 
ton and Dr. Thos. F. Staley to mourn the loss of a beloved wife and 
mother. One of her sons married Sue Reynolds, a well-known 
■daughter of the Academv. 

— The "Salem Junior Naturalist Club," recently received their 
badge pins from the parent Society at Cornell University, and are 

"very pleased with them, as well as with the kindly encouraging let- 
ters from Uncle John. Some days ago Blanche Kinc; brought to 
class a fine specimen of the magnificent Luna Moth, ' ' Tropea Luna. 
It is the most beautiful of the giant silkworm moths, a little over 3 
inches in length. Its wings are of a delicate light green color, with 

.a purple brown band on the front edge of the fore wings, besides 4 
moon-like eyes on its wings. Reginald Clewell also brought us a 
richly colored " Cecropia Moth," while it has not the delicate ap- 
pearance of the Luna, it far exceeds it in its gorgeous coloring and 
exquisite tints. The interest shown by the members of this Club is 
exceedingly gratifying. Their powers of observation are being trained 

.and developed, and their descriptive faculties are also improved ; a 
recent squirrel story written by some of them would bear a favorable 
comparison with the work of some of the higher classes. 

Miss RETTA Wesloskv's graduating dinner, in the Domestic 
.Science Department was a great success. 



The Academy 2399 

— Miss L. Chittv recently obtained a very interesting plant, 
the '" Shortia Galacifolia ; " its habitat is in the mountains of Western 
North Carolina, where it was first discovered and named by the 
great botanist, Michaux, "200 years ago. Then it was lost sight of 
until within the last fifteen years, when it was re-discovered and 
brought to Statesville, N. C, to Messrs. Hyams establishment. It 
is not found in any other locality, so far as we know. We have 
another shy little denizen of the wild-woods found no where else 
under the sun, save here in North Carolina, and that is the Venus 
Fly Trap, " Dionea Muscipula," an interesting and peculiar plant. 
We do not make enough of these distinctive features of our good 
old State. 

—Prof. Shirley and John Clewell, Jr., on a recent tramp in 
the woods found a fine specimen of the edible Mushroom, a Morel, 
" Morchella Deliciosa," which is so highly prized for its delicate 
flavor. In the dainty " Brook Book," of Mary Rogers Miller, we 
find a charming sketch of this Mushroom. 

— The beautiful picture "Christ in the Temple," has been 
framed, with a rich, heavy gilt frame, and hangs in the Chapel, 
north of the organ. The light is good, the frame is handsome and 
the picture is a sermon in itself. We congratulate the Class of 1901 
on the success of their Memorial. 

— A fine Concert was given by the St. Cecelia Club, under the 
direction of Mrs. Annie Sprinkle. The proceeds are to be used in 
placing a Memorial Window in the new Hall. 



jrBartteo 



Parker— Talcott - In All Saints' Church, Richmond, Va., April 22, 
1903, Dr. Truman A. Parker to Miss Augusta McVickars Tai.cott. 

Scrivener — Vaughan — On April 12, 1903, in St. James Episcopal 
Church, Anne Arundel Co., Md , Mr Frederick William Scrivener to 
Miss Annie, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. M. H. Vaughn, Maryland. 

Cheek - Taylor — In Durham, N. C, April 9th, 1904, Mr. Thomas 
Edgar Cheek to Miss Elizabeth Cameron Taylor. 

Hege— McGeehee.— On April 29,1903, Mt.Edgar Hege to Miss Nan- 
nie McGeehee, of Madison, N. C. 



2400 



The Academy. 



A New Book--- " Before the Dawn." 



Doubleday, Page & Co. , New York City, publishers, price 
$1.50. By Joseph Altsheler. The scene is laid in and around Rich- 
mond, and the book serves a double purpose ; it affords the reader 
pleasure as a delightful story, but it also teaches history. No one 
can read ' ' Before the Dawn ' ' without realizing the terrible chapter 
which embraces the last days of the Civil War, and at the same 
time it gives us a glimpse of southern life in those trying times. 
The writer adroitly handles the subject so as to avoid the difficulties 
of the situation, and brings out the admirable points of both North- 
ern and Southern men. The romance also is ably carried through 
the story, aud the description of the Battle of the Wilderness and 
the Capture of Richmond are strong features of the work. Alto- 
gether, ' ' Before the Dawn is a valuable contribution to the liter- 
erature of the day. 

— The following advertisement of the Ashcraft-Hege Dry Goods 
Co. , . was handed in too late for our advertising pages, and we give 
it place among our local items : 



To the Patrons and Friends of S. F. A., Sa/em, A r . C: 

Every Spring and Summer Want Supplied in Dress Goods, 

Trimmings and Notions. 

Special Drive in Silks, all Grades Taffeta Silk, Peau de Soie and 

Foulards. 

1 Grade 19 inches wide, all shades, 50c. value for 39c. 

2 " 19 " " high lustre, ... 75c. " " 65c. 

3 " 24 " " Guaranteed to wash, good value for $1.00. 

4 " 36 " " Black, very good for 75c. 

5 " 36 " " " " " $1.00. 

6 " 36 " " Black and White, high lustre, $1.25. 

7 " 36 " " Peau de Soie, all silk, $1.25, $1.50, $1.75. 

8 " 40 " " Grenadine, plain and fancy. .. .silk, $1.00. 

9 " 54 " " Black Taffeta, good quality, $2.00, 

In Wash Silks we have a full line at 29c. and 48c. 

In Foulard Silks we have a nice line, 25 inches wide. Satin 

Finish, 75c. value, going for 69c. 

We have a full line of Cotton and Silk Black and White 

from 10c. to $2.00 per yard. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE DRESS GOODS CO. 



Utetr. 



Stalky. — In Marion, Va., in March, 1903, Mrs. Pauline A. Staley 
(nee Hull), wife of Mr. Walter S. Staley. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 

L.. Pauline Sessoms — Editor-in-chief. 
Mary B. Gudger- Assistant Editor. 
Frances Powers— Exchange Editor. 
Agnes Belle Goldsby — Literary Editor. 
Corinne Baskin— Business Manager. 



IStitiorial. 



— No one can deny that we are nearly all of us superstitious, in 
one-way or another. We may langh when another believes in the 
thirteen fetish, may boldly walk under a ladder, may begin an im- 
portant enterprise on Friday, but — nothing will induce us to put on 
our right shoe before our left. That is, you know, simply putting 
our best foot foremost. 

And how many will not, when something has been forgotten, 
turn back and count twelve backwards so that the ill luck may be 
charmed away. Then, too, if a school-girl is boasting of some good 
mark'she has gained, she makes it a point to immediately ' ' touch 
wood ' ' in order not to ' ' flunk ' ' in her next quiz. 

Many of our superstitious customs have come down to us from 
the Greeks and Romans. The use of Christmas greens originated 
from^the Roman Saturnalia, a festival celebrated in the latter part 
of December.. The breaking of a bottle of wine over the bow of a 
ship t at Jier launching is a relic of the ancient custom of propitiating 
the gods by libations. 



2402 The Euterpean 

Some Attempts at Photography. 



Here we are, a crowd of eight, off for the Play Grounds to 
take some kodak pictures. 

To an observer we appear as an opera troupe, for which picture 
picture we intend to pose before returning to the Academy. 

We are arrayed in rather peculiar costume. Some with um- 
brellas, some with grips, and all with big straw hats or bonnets. 

"Where shall the first picture be taken! Memorial steps, 
Society Hall, Swings or Memorial entrance?" After much discus- 
sion the place first mentioned is chosen. "Who shall take the 
picture? Call another girl to join us, or shall one of our party 
' snap us ?' ' One of the eight is chosen, and the others are seated 
in attitudes prepared to look their best. 

' ' All over !' ' calls our photographer, and we make a dash for 
"lover's leap," where two girls lovingly recline in each other's 
arms, posed to represent that word so despised by our teachers — 
' ' lovers. ' ' 

We roll rather than walk down the hill to the spring, where 
some one calls : ' ' How about a few climbing on the spring house ? 
That would make a fine picture !" After reaching the top of this 
building, a cry of "be quick, or we'll fall !" reminds us our friends 
are human, not possessing that ability of flies to stick. 

We are all tired, and so sit down. In the mean time one of 
our party produces a bag of bananas, which most suddenly disap- 
pears. 

During our short rest no time has been lost. A suggestion is 
made that we run over to the meadow and have some more fun. 
The motion is carried, and away we go. It is but a matter of a 
few minutes before we reach the appointed place. Even if one girl 
has made a rent in her frock which will occupy her for several sew- 
ing hours, the accident has suggested a new way for a picture. 

On the clover-covered hill seven of the party seat themselves 
in the form of steps, This picture is entitled ' ' The Seven Jolly 
Sisters," but one would be more apt to call it " The Seven Hats," 
as they are about the only things visible. 

On the fence the company again gather themselves. With 
their many-colored garments they resemble a row of brilliantly- 
colored birds or poppies. 



The Euterpean. 2403 

It is now decided to take the closing picture, namely : the 
entire troupe. A girl is hailed from the opposite hill, and the 
eight seat themselves in a theatrical position. The button is pressed 
and all is over. 

Tired and looking like a crowd of worn-out travellers we return, 
to the Academy to array ourselves for dinner, and await the most 
welcome of all sounds to us then — the ring of the bell. 



Advertisements. 



AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY. 

The art of advertising has now become one of the many indus- 
tries of the civilized world. Numbers of men and women have 
made large fortunes, and still greater numbers have amassed neat 
little sums of money by their ingenious devices in this line of legiti- 
mate business. 

Solomon has said : "Of making many books there is no end, ' ' 
and if that wise king had lived in the present age he would doubt- 
less make a similar remark in regard to advertisements. 

In glancing over the advertising columns of some newspaper oe 
magazine one is often tempted to agree with David in his assertion 
that ' ' all men are liars, ' ' though we might make a slight change in 
his words and say, ' ' few men are not liars. ' ' 

Persons riding in the street cars find themselves reading the 
bills posted above their heads almost before they are aware of the 
fact, and when their destination is reached they know by heart the 
fine qualities of Pears' Soap, the excellence of the Eastman Kodak,, 
and the redeeming virtues of the jolly little Gold Dust twins. 

A year or two ago college boys and girls had a craze for 
Posters, and displayed their artistic tastes by covering the walls of; 
their rooms with these gay pictures. 

A curious as well as pathetic way of advertising is that of the 
"Sandwich Man" (so-called because of his position between the 
two boards which are securely strapped over his shoulders) who 
trudges along, day by day, under this great burden. Perhaps the 
board in front is inscribed in gaudy letters announcing the first ap- 
pearance in London of the famous and world-renowned ballet dan- 
cer, Mademoiselle Sulitutu, who will remain in the metropolis dur- 



2404 The Euterpean. 

ing the following week only. The other board states in simple 
black and white characters that Green, the grocer on Southampton 
Row, sells the juiciest oranges and the most luscious grapes to be 
found in all London town. Doubtless, the bearer of these notices 
wishes that he were able to purchase some Of the dainties for his 
wee lads and lassies, and as he plods his daily rounds through 
sunshine and shadow, his shoulders bent beneath the heavy load, 
his sun-burned face weary and traced with deep lines of care, he 
thinks of the dingy rooms in the tenement house he calls " home," 
of the sad-eyed little woman who never complains, and of the hun- 
gry small boys and girls who eagerly await " Dad's " return. 

Of course the main object of all advertising is to have some- 
thing entirely original. 

A painter, living on the outskirts of one of our Southern cities, 
adopted a novel plan. 

Two inquisitive goats entered his garden, enticed by the fresh 
green herbs, delicious vegetables and shining tin cans therein. They 
found a regular Garden of Eden and had never enjoyed themselves 
so much since they were kids. Suddenly the artist spied the in- 
truders. " Here is my chance !" thought he, and before the goats 
quite knew what had happened the painter had covered them both 
with brilliant hues of blue, green, yellow, red, orange and purple. 
It need scarcely be said that the rest of the herd refused to recog- 
nize their multi-colored companions. The owner of the motley 
marauders prosecuted the painter, nevertheless the name of Parkes 
has been made famous in a certain way by his animated, frisky, 
though innocent assistants who carry the ' ' paint that wont come 
off." 

Christmas and New Year bring numerous pretty and attractive 
advertisements in the shape of calendars, which the butcher, the 
baker, the candlestick-maker send to their patrons with the season's 
greetings. 

One of the newest advertisements of the Packer Tar Soap 
Company is entitled "Pure as the Pines." It is the picture of a 
dear little girl, with soft curls, wide-opened eyes and an innocent 
mouth. The tiny maiden is surrounded with spotless Easter lilies. 

A couple of staid Dutchmen, in wooden shoes and loose 
blouses, discuss, over their pipes, the merits of Van Camp's soups. 

The booklet, " A Harmony in Two Flats," cleverlv advertises 
the Regina Music Box. 



The Euterpean. 2405 

The average painterof signs gets a salary of about thirty dol- 
lars a week, rarely more. Manufacturers of breakfast foods, medi- 
cines, cleaning compositions and various other articles, receive 
every day countless verses and jingles proclaiming the superiority 
of their wares. 

Sometimes one firm . employs a particularly clever artist or 
rhymster, and he does work for no other. Any one who has shown 
.such talent can name his own price and be very sure of receiving it. 

gorietg i^ciws. 

MARY B. GUDGER. 



— A most interesting debate was enjoyed in the Euterpean 
Society hall on Friday evening, March 20th. The subject being : 
' ' Has Chivalry Declined in the South. ' ' The papers were splendid 
on both sides, and not only the debaters, but all the members of 
the society, became greatly excited. 

It was a hard thing to decide who had the best papers — the 
affirmatives or the negatives. However, the former won in the 
long run. We congratulate Miss Mattiella Cocke and Miss 
Henrietta Reid. 

— Before the school term closes we have planned to have one 
or two evenings given over to debate. 

— For the past two weeks we have been unable to have Society 
meetings, as our hall. has been torn up, getting ready for the new 
improvements. We hope soon to again resume the weekly meet- 
ings, and anticipate great pleasure in the many changes that are to 
take place. 

— Since our meetings have been so broken into this month, 
you may find in the following quotations, girls, some of the benefit 
that you would have gained had we been able to hold meetings : 

" Pose on no pedestals, and you'll escape falls." 

The more we do the more we can do, the more busy we are 
the more leisure we have. — Hazlett. 

Beauty when unadorned adorned the most. — Thomson. 

To err is human ; to forgive divine. — Pope. 

Knowledge is proud that he has learned so much ; wisdom is 
humble that he knows no more. — Coivper. 

Wit is a dangerous weapon.— Montaigne. 

In the bright lexicon of youth there's no such word as fail.- 
Bulwer. 

How poor are they that have not patience. — Shakespeare. 



2406 The Euterpean. 

Members of Euterpean Society. 



Elizabeth Sloan 
Pauline Sessoms 
Lita Young 
Mary Gudger 
Matiella Cocke 
Retta Wesloskey 
Henrietta Reid 
Corinne Bask in 
Elizabeth Bow den- 
Adah Clarke 
Emma Aird 
Mabel Ham 
Mary Richardson 
Elizabeth Warren 
Lena Sessoms 
Hannah Dewey 
Carrie Leyy 
Annie Walker 
Julia Barnard 
Louise Rice 
Nellie Clark 
Laura Williams 
Clara Ware 
Ruby McCorkle 
Eya Harris 
Mary Adams 
Stella Alspaugh 
Frankie Alspaugh 
Mary Bailey 



Frances Powers 
Margie Wilson 
Etta Wilson 
Ida May Drew- 
Mary McMurray 
Agnes Belle Goldsby 
Emma Greider 
Lettie Hollingsworth 
Rachel Hollingsworth 
Kate Taylor 
Mamie McEachern 
Lula McEachern 
Mary Frost 
Esther Hampton 
Jennie Cardwell 
Lelia Flynn 
Ruth Willingham 
Kathleen Smith 
Lila Little 
Fanny Little 
Helen Buck 
Florence Barnard 
Glenn McDonald 
Lillie Dorman 
Aline Rouche 
Mary Watlington 
Ellie Erwin 
Marie Reynolds 
Agnes Dunlap 
Mary Liles 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Katie M. Kilbuck — Editor in-chief. 
Sadie M. Rollins — Assistant Editor. 
Adah A. Petway — Literary Editor. 
Florence Moorman — Exchange Editor. 
Louise F. Harper — Business Manager. 



lEtritorial department. 



— It is said that of the many, many late books that are pub- 
lished that they reach the cities and large towns, but, comparatively 
speaking, they are not widely distributed. 

The book agent does his duty but the older books are gener- 
ally more in his line. 

If the book itself has such qualities as to commend itself to 
thousands of people why surely the same qualities would hold good 
for three times as many. Hence, everything possible ought to be 
done for the wide distribution of new books, for it is fully recognized 
that book-selling is still in its infancy. 



— New Hampshire has followed in the footsteps of Vermont by 
abandoning its policy of prohibition or semi-prohibition of the 
liquor traffic. 

After New Hampshire's withdrawal only Maine, Kansas and 
North Dakota are left as prohibition States. 



2408 The Hesperian. 

Re-marking the "Dixie" Line. 



There are many popular errors regarding the Mason and Dixon 
line, a boundary laid out in colonial days, which later figured prom- 
inently in the affairs of the Republic. 

In 1763 the work was begun by the surveyors under the super- 
vision of William Penn and Lord Baltimore. The work was finished 
in 1767, and such good work is it that our best modern surveyors 
wonder at its thoroughness, despite the lack of transportation at 
that time — and at some points find it difficult to imitate. 

In 1849 the line was revised by Charles Mason and Jeremiah 
Dixon, whose work was so accurate that the change involved by 
the correction amounted to less than two acres, which space was 
added to Maryland. 

One of the erroneous impressions regarding the Mason and 
Dixon line is that it was marked altogether by stones. Of course, 
stone markers were used as much as possible, but at points almost 
inaccessible they were obliged to resort to mounds and rocks, which 
points can still be seen from high mountains. 

The original stone markers were brought from England. They 
are of a light, grayish-brown color, being a strange mixture of sand 
and limestone, and are distinguishable by their peculiar odor, which 
is not unlike that of sulphur. 

It has become necessary to substitute 75 new stones to replace 
those carried away and broken. Every fifth stone is of white marble, 
with Penn's coat of arms on one side and the escutcheon of Lord 
Baltimore on the other. 

The work of re-marking or restoring as it were this line is 
rapidly nearing completion, under the direction of a joint commis- 
sion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, who are proud of the line be- 
cause Lord Baltimore and William Penn were instrumental in having 
it located. 

The efforts to reconstruct this boundary were first manifested 
in April, 1901, by the Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs 
and has been pursued at irregular intervals. 

The placing of the markers is in charge of Edward R. Martin. 
He has had many an interesting experience in recovering the stones. 
Some were in use in buildings as doorsteps, others were converted 
into porch steps, while others served as sills in carriage yards, and 



The Hesperian. 2409 

still another was used as a curb in the streets of Clear Spring, Md. 
These have all been secured, but there are still six of the original 
stones in use as door sills, but their possessors refuse to give them 
up, and so far there has been no legal proceeding to recover them. 



The Verb "To Break." 



" I begin to understand your language better," said my French 
friend to me ; ' ' but your verbs puzzle me still — you mix them up 
so with prepositions. 

"I saw your friend, Mrs. Jones, just now," he continued. 
' ' She says she intends to break down her school earlier than usual. 
Am I right there ?' ' 

' ' Break up her school, she must have said. ' ' 

" Oh, yes, I remember ; break up the school." 

" Why does she do that?" I asked. 

' ' Because her health is broken into. 

" Broken dozem." 

"Broken dotun, Oh, yes ; and indeed since fever has broken 
up in the town — " 

' ' Broken out. ' ' 

' ' She thinks she will leave it for a few weeks. ' ' 

"Will she leave the house alone?" 

' ' No ; she is afraid it will be broken — broken — ; how do I 
say that?" 

' ' Broken into. ' ' 

" Certainly ! It is what I meant to say." .. 

' ' Is her son to be married soon ?' ' 

" No, that engagement is broken — broken — " 

"Broken^" 

Yes, broken off." 

" Ah ! I had not heard that. ' ' 

' ' She is very sorry about it. Her only son broke the news 
down to her last week. Am I right ? I am anxious to speak Eng- 
lish well." 

" He merely broke the news ; no preposition this time." 

" It is hard to understand. That young man — her son — is a 
fine fellow ; a breaker, I think. ' ' 

" A broker and a very fine fellow." — Australian Young Folks. 



2410 The Hesperian 

Utterarg jiotesi. 



ADAH A. PETWAY. 



"The Conquering of Kate," by J. P. M. A fresh and charm- 
ing love story, dealing- with the fortunes of two beautiful sisters and 
their family estate in Southern Pennsylvanin. 

" The Pit," by Frank Morris. This is the story of a woman's 
love and its entanglements with a great speculation. It is all so 
strong and vital, so filled with varied interests, so absorbing and 
compelling, that it is one of the year's books which one cannot 
afford to miss. 

"Lady Rose's Daughter," by Mrs. Humphrey Ward, is a 
story keeping tally with English social life. Throughout the work 
there is a strain one does not like, and having finished it the reader 
asks himself or herself what possible good a book of this kind 
could do. 

"The Star Dreamer," by Agnes and Fgerton Castle, is an 
unusual romance, mixed up with the sciences and expressed in 
beautiful English. 

" Under the Rose," by Isham, a pretty comedy of the love of 
both a Duke and a Jester, the scene of which is laid in France. 



Uoofcs of ti)e JBaij. 



"The Pit." Norris. 

" The Virginians." Wister. 

" Letters of a Self-Made Merchant to His Son." Lorimer. 

" Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch." Rice. 

"The Leopard's Spots." Dixon. 

" The Smrcl. rs." W;!-< n. 



The Hesperian. 2411 

ILocals. 



— Bertha Hall spent Easter at her home in Clemmonsville, 
N. C. 

— Mrs. Moorman spent several days with her two daughters, 
Florence and Corrinna, last month. 

— Pescud Chisman has returned to the Academy, after spend- 
ing the Easter holidays at her home, Pine Hall, N. C. 

— May Morrison, a former Hesperian, spent Easter in the 
Academy. We are always glad to see her. 

— Rachel Borden's father made a few days' visit here last 
month. 

— We are more than glad to announce that Mrs. Clewell is 
speedily recovering, and sincerely trust that she will be entirely well 
ere long. 

— Mrs. T. F. Malloy and son, Fagg, spent Easter with Bishop 
and Mrs. Rondthaler. 

— We are glad to have Miss Stafford with us again after 
several days illness. 

— Bess Gold has gone to Greensboro for several days. 

— Annie Walker spent the Easter holidays at her home in 
Reidsville, N. C. 

— We were more than sorry to know of Bess Warren's de- 
parture, and hope that her eyes will permit her to return very soon. 

— Mrs. Borden, of Goldsboro. visited her daughter during the 
Easter season. 

Miss Helen Reid, of Reidsville, N. C. , spent Easter with her 
sister in the Academy. 

— Misses May Riddick and Clara Boren visited Cam Lind- 
ley during Easter. 

— Miss Kathaleen Smith, of Lexington, N. C, was the guest 
of Miss Stafford during Easter. 

— The Seniors planted their Class Ivv the morning of April 
16th. 



2412 The Hesperian. 

lExcijange department. 



FLORENCE MOORMAN. 



— The Monthly Maroo?i is one of our best exchanges. Every 
issue contains interesting short stories, and the March issue is quite 
up to its usual high standard. 

— The March issue of The Comenian is of special interest to us 
because it is the ' ' Comenius number, ' ' and contains a picture and 
sketch of the great Moravian bishop, John Amos Comenius. 

— In the Austin College Reveille for March we find "The 
Candle Moth," an interesting short story, which gives us a vivid 
example of the way in which great things may be accomplished by 
the means of small instruments. 

— The Crimson contains a descriptive story entitled " A Mich- 
igan Deer Hunt. ' ' We always find many good jokes and witty 
sayings in this paper. 

— It gives us genuine pleasure to welcome the following Ex- 
changes, and we regret that our space is too limited to allow us to 
comment upon them : The Cadet, The Linden Hall Echo, The 
Hall Boy, The Red and WJiite and The Pine and Thistle. 

— On March 29th the members of the King's Daughters Circle 
met for the last time this year, and a most delightful close it was 
too. The impressive closing exercises consisted of sacred songs, 
and recitations by some of the members. 

After a few remarks from Miss Fogle and a farewell word from 
the President, the new officers were elected as follows : 
President — Brietz Thom. 
Vice President — Ruth Matthews. 
Sec'y and Treas. — Mary Culpepper. 
We wish the King's Daughters success for the coming year, 
and think the newly-elected officers insure that, 



The Academy. 



2413 




James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ 

REAL ESTATE 



LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Correspondence solicited. 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream Puffs, ~\ 20 cts. 
Crescents, >■ per 
Cup Cakes, J dozen. 



Vanilla Wafers, ~) 10 cts. 
Kisses, > per 

Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



Iwmww wmmm mmm 



.2414 The Academy. 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
"" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

'I his Department is stocked with the laigest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston-Salt m. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailcrs a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 2415 

History of Wacohvia in North Carolina. 

By Rev. John H. Clewell, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title 
Printed by Doublcday, Page df Co , New York. Price .delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new histor\ should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 

sympathy with the history of the town and section as. well as the school. The former pupils 

will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 

carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure 

Read what some of the friends say/ 

Gov. Aycock savs : — " I have read with much pleasure your History of Wachovia. You 
have done your work wel'. It is a real contribution to the history of the State. I wish that 
every person in the State could read it. I not onlv know more about you' people than I 
knew before, but I love my State better by reason of having read your book. 

John W Jordan, Esq., of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, says: " The chapters 
relating to Salem Female Academv, compiled from original records, are exceedingly inter- 
esting, and the illustrations will recall 10 many scholars and graduates pleasing incidents 
connected with their schooi life. The bonk ought to be w idelv known, not only in Mora- 
vian circle « but to all interested in the historv of North Carolin i and its justly celebrated 
institution for the education of young ladies. The stvle is pleasing and the make up attract- 
ive, and I hope that you will very soon have to prepare a second edition of the work. 

The finished book is now ready to be delivered, and orders sent to the undersigned will 
eceive prompt attention. 

Address, Rev. }. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem N. C. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T VOGT.ER & SON, 

WTKSTO\-SALFM, Jf. C. 



2416 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL. 

V^e are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line of 

_--:___NOTIONS,-:- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 5 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON-SALEM, IV. O. 



The Academy. 2417 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when jou 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



2418 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

OAK ridge, y. a 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES 

$160 to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H HOLT, Prins. 

When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place vour son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 

NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S. J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham School-1902-03 

Located on the AsheviUe Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office. "Asheville, N. C 



JLj # 



p. 



The Academy. 2419 

D 



WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER 

$OUTBGRn_RAILOJAY. 

The Standard Railway of the SOUTH. 

The Direct Line to all Points. 

TEXAS, 
CALIFORNIA 
FLORIDA, 
CUBA AND 
PORTO RICO. 

Strictly FIRST CLASS Equipment on all Through 
and Local Trains ; Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars- 
on all Night Trains ; Fast and Safe Schedules. 

Travel by the Southern and you are assured a Safe, Comfortable and Expedi- 
tious Journey. 
Apply to Ticket Agents for Time Tables, Rates and General Information, or 
address R. L. VERNON, F. R. DARBY, 

T. P. A.. Charlotte, N. C. C.P.& T.A.,Ashevlile,N.C 

FRANK S. GANNON, J. M. CULP, S. H. HARDWICK, 

3d V. P. & Gen. Man. Traf. Man. G. P. A. Washington, D. C 



2420 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter Siate University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arith netic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogua. 

JAS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 

YOU 

WANT 

THE 

SHOE 

THAT'S 

ALL 

THE 

GO? 



IP 
SO 

S ri rl 

us 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTH33L J"OIsTES. 

J. L. JOXES. late of Joies House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market aTordf . We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 
At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Rtf^rence : Sa'eni Fern i!e Academy. 



p*ALEM ACADEMY AHD (JOLLEljE 

WINSTON=SALEM, N. C. 

FOUNDED 1802 
Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph.D., Principal 



The following information will be of service to prospective pa- 
trons or to those who may desire to know more of our methods. 
The work of the School can only be given in outline in this brief 
space, but a Catalogue and other printed matter will be sent to those 
who apply to the Principal. 

BUILDINGS AND LOCATION. 

The location is in Western North Carolina, 1000 feet above sea 
level, on the foot hills of the Blue Ridge. The School grounds 
embrace more than 30 acres of land, and include a beautiful park 
with magnificent natural scenery. There are nearly a dozen build- 
ings, forming a small village. The School has a capacity of 400 
pupils, with the ability of caring for nearly half that number of board- 
ing pupils. The total enrollment of teachers and pupils last year 
was 380. 

METHODS. 

The Preparatory and Collegiate Departments are well equipped 
for thorough work, and the most modern methods are employed. 
With the personal interest in each pupil, with the happy home life, 
and with the thorough, up-to-date methods of instruction a Salem 
girl will always improve in health, character and intellect. 



2422 The Academy. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Music. — During the century of its history Salem has been in 
the lead in its musical advantages. More than 300 names were reg- 
istered in this Department last year. 

Art. — The Studio offers advantages in Drawing and Painting, 
in Water Colors, Oil, China, Glass and Tapestry. Here the advan- 
tages are very fine. 

Commercial. — The study of Book-keeping, Shorthand, Teleg- 
raphy, etc., are so universal, that they need no introduction. In 
Salem all these and more can be studied. 

Industrial. — Instruction in Cooking and Sewing are not 
universally found, and yet we offer the best advantages in both. The 
Catalogue will tell you more about these studies. 

Languages. — The Class Rooms supply good opportunities in 
the Languages, but those who wish to gain lost ground, or make 
special progress, can find all the facilities for private study in Latin 
or Greek, German or French. 

CARE OF THE SICK. 

A Professional Trained Nurse will give instruction in the care 
of the sick, just that information which every girl should have in 
order to be able to do her duty in the home in later years. 

YOUNG PUPILS. 

The peculiarly careful home regulations enable us to take very 
little girls. Hence boarding pupils even as young as from 8 to 10 
years can be sent to us. 

HIGH IDEALS. 

The ideal of the School is more than intellectual attainments 
Only. Improvement of mind, body and character forms the ideal of 
the School. 

TERMS. 

While not a cheap School, Salem is an economical institution, 
where everything is the best, with a moderate but fair charge for 
what is furnished. 

Full particulars are given in the Catalogue which will be sent 
on application. 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol.26. Winston-Salem, N. C. , May— June, 1903. No. 230.. 

Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 1 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College ; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

lEtittortal. 



— The 102d Annual Session of Salem Academy and Col- 
lege will begin Tuesday, September 8, 1903. Pupils will do well 
to arrive some days in advance, in order that they may be assigned, 
to their classes. It is also an advantage to former pupils to arrive 
before the opening exercises, since the choice of rooms and places 
with special teachers can be decided better before the- opening day- 
than later. 



— The year just closed has been a prosperous and happy one. 
It was the first year in the new century, and, in many respects,, 
marked a new era in the work. The attendance was good, as the 
catalogue shows a list of 382 names. The health was good, as 
there was not a serious case of illness among the pupils. The con- 
duct was above the average, and this contributed much to the hap- 
piness of pupils and teachers. 



— The special departments were well filled. In the various 
branches of the Music Department more than three hundred regis- 



2424 The Academy. 

tered. The work done in the special departments was very good. 
Worthy of particular note is that of the piano scholars. The series 
of recitals during the Spring proved the strength of the piano de- 
partment, and the Commencement Concerts brought out the Vocal 
Department in a very pleasing manner. The Art Exhibit displayed 
the skill of the teacher as shown in the work of her pupils, while 
the numbers in the Cooking classes were far above the average 
year. Thus we might go from department to department and in 
each and every one pleasing results appear. 



— The active work which has been done on the Alumnae Cen- 
tennial Memorial Hall has aroused new interest in this undertaking. 
•The gifts which are acknowledged elsewhere are very liberal, and 
promise well for future efforts. The excavations for the founda- 
tions of the buildings are now complete, and the former attractive 
lawn, north of the Principal's house, is now a great basement, ready 
for the brick masons to begin their work. As a matter of sentiment 
the loss of this beautiful lawn, with its flowers and shrubbery, its 
vines and summer-house, was a sore trial ; but in the onward march 
of progress changes must come, and this seems to be one of the 
inevitable results. 



— The question is frequently asked : ' ' What of the new year ?' ' 
As an index of the interest in the School this question is a natural 
one, and we are glad to be able to say that the prospects are fully 
equal to or better than those of recent years. But another question 
would be far more profitable for the school : ' ' What am I able to 
do for the good of the school-year ?' ' The answer to this question 
will make that of the first one a very easy matter. There is some- 
thing for each one to do ; the pupils, young and old, can influence 
companions to attend, and this will insure satisfactory numbers. 
The teachers can increase the numbers also, and can devise new and 
better lines of work for their departments. The Alumnae can plan 
for the increase of friendship at home and abroad, and for the build- 
ing up of the Endowment, which is so necessary for the carrying 
forward of the plans now being laid for the future. The patrons 
and citizens of our community can aid in all of these and in many 



The Academy. 2425 

other ways, and if all these forces are brought to bear in favor of 
the school, we can then say in advance : " the coming school year 
will be one of unusual prosperity. ' ' 



— Among the changes which come with the close of one year 
and the beginning of another we note the addition of the name of 
Miss Elsie Cecil Thomas to the Faculty. Miss Thomas studied 
in the schools of Philadelphia, Pa. , where she was awarded a prize 
of $500 in a competition with several hundred fellow pupils. She- 
then entered Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. , and has studied 
and taught in this famous college during the past four years, having 
graduated this year. Miss Thomas is an able linguist, and will 
have charge of the French department, (Mile LaPorte having 
resigned) but will also do work in the Latin department, having 
made a special study of Latin Composition. The Academy extends 
to this new member of the faculty its best wishes for a happy and 
successful work in our midst. 



— At a recent meeting of the officers of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion elaborate plans were laid out for the work of the summer and 
the work of the coming school year. The building operations 
should not cease, but money will be needed to push forward the 
new Hall, and it was decided to make a number of efforts this sum- 
mer, to be followed by a special effort in the new school year, when 
pupils, teachers and community will be invited to join in the raising 
of funds. If to these efforts the Alumnae at a distance will add 
their support the results will be satisfactory in every respect. 



— The Committee on Endowment reports that during the 
present year some income from the funds thus far paid in will be 
available, and it is a gratifying fact that the actual benefit from en- 
dowment will thus be felt, even though in a modest manner. Only 
when with the passing years this income will have been greatly in- 
creased, will the school be placed in a position to stand firm in the 
midst of all the vicissitudes of changing years. 



'2426 The Academy. 

— While in conversation with a patron from a distant state the 

remark was made : "I will inform Mr. in regard to your 

school. He has two girls under his care, and he should send them 
to Salem. We have in our entire church no school in which the 
home features are so emphasized as in Salem." This is, indeed, 
-one of the chief features which commends itself to thoughtful and 
considerate parents. The genuine interest, personal interest which 
is found in Salem is seldom found elsewhere, and this it is which 
makes possible the best results in all the other departments, — the 
peculiar home care and interest in the individual pupil. 



— Mr. C. B. Pfohl has received and accepted a call to become 
the representative of Salem Academy and College before the 
public. He will spend the greater portion of his time among the 
present and prospective patrons. His wide acquaintance with pupils, 
present and former, and also with so large a number of patrons and 
friends of the school will insure for him a hearty welcome and a 
cordial cooperation wherever he visits. 



— Intending patrons are requested to correspond with us at as 
early a date as possible in regard to the studies and grading of their 
daughters. Many points of importance can be decided in this way 
in advance of the pupil's arrival in Salem. 



— The special regulations connected with the monthly exami- 
nation, or "quiz," as it was termed, and the final examinations 
decidedly raised the tone of the scholarship. It resulted in a num- 
ber dropping from the regular course, but the great majority were 
stimulated to greater exertion and accomplished far better results. 
The greatest good will appear as one class follows another, and the 
graduates of a few years hence will be the most strenuous advocates 
<of the new and improved order iof tthings. 



The Academy. 2427 

COMMENCEMENT. 



The May-June number of The Academy may well be termed 
the Commencement number. This number is also the issue 
which is read by strangers more largely than is the paper published 
in any other month of the year. In preparing this sketch we write 
rather for the pupil and the patron, and we bear in mind that they 
desire details and points of minor interest which may not appeal to 
a stranger. The former pupils will have lived through the days of 
Commencement with us, and they wish us to tell them just how this 
occasion passed off at the close of this, the first year in the new 
century. 

The story of Commencement, 1903, goes back into the school 
year a month or more. The lists of weekly or semi-weekly Recitals 
in April and May were really a part of Commencement. The grad- 
uating recitals, the programmes prepared by the piano pupils, the 
vocal pupils and the elocution pupils, as well as those of the teachers 
themselves, were of unusual merit, and not only showed the excel- 
lence of the work accomplished, but also gave the opportunity to 
the greater portion of the pupils to appear in public, an opportunity 
which always stimulates to greater exertion on the part of the pupil. 

Then there were the special social functions which precede 
Commencement : the class receptions, the picnics, the trolley rides, 
and so on. The warm, dry weather of May contributed to the suc- 
cess of all these, so that when Commencement itself arrived every- 
one was ready for it. 

The plan of the Commencement week was changed somewhat, 
so as to make it one day less, and yet nothing of importance was 
omitted. Sunday was the day for the Baccalaureate Sermon. Mon- 
day was Seniors' day, with the first Concert in the evening. Tues- 
day was the Alumnae day, with the Grand Concert in the evening. 
Wednesday morning was Commencement day proper. The Art 
Exhibit was open to the public on several occasions. 

BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Sunday morning dawned bright and clear and had the appear- 
ance of a Commencement occasion. Busy hands arranged a mag- 
nificent bank of water lillies on the platform which had been erected 



2428 The Academy. 

for the use of the Class in this their graduation week. These flow- 
ers were generously donated by Dr. Bahnson, and we feel certain 
that no other occasion in any part of the old North State can boast 
an equally magnificent display of this rare and beautiful flower with 
its white petals and its golden heart. 

The Seniors occupied places on the platform, and the occasion 
was presided over by Dr. Clewell. He was assisted by Bishop 
Rondthaler, Rev. H. E. Rondthaler and Dr. Caldwell. Mr. 
W. J. Peterson presided at the organ and the Church Choir was 
assisted by the Salem Orchestra. The school occupied the platform 
on either side of the Seniors, and the remainder of the church was 
filled by a great congregation from Winston-Salem, and by the 
patrons who began to arrive during the preceding week. It was a 
bright and inspiring sight, the fine old church auditorium in which 
Academy pupils have worshipped for more than a hundred years, 
the graduates on the platform, the beautiful flowers, the vast con- 
gregation. 

The service was opened with the Litany, and after the intro- 
ductory service the choir selection, with full orchestral accompani- 
ment, was most beautifully rendered. The sermon was delivered 
by Rev. G. B. Strickler, of Richmond, Va. This gifted divine 
took as his text Heb. 4:12 : " For the word of God is quick and 
powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to 
the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and mar- 
row, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart." 

Without attempting to give an outline of the sermon itself we 
will quote from the Winston Sentinel, which said : " In concluding 
Dr. Strickler made a rapid and convincing summary of the attri- 
butes of the Word, asking whence its wonderful vitality to be able 
to resist assaults ; whence its power, its purifying influences, its 
ability to bestow every grace and virtue? Whence its revealing 
power, its discerning power to lay bare all the inner life? Why 
have not Socrates, Plato, Cato, Cicero, Seneca, the greatest ancient 
thinkers and moralists, given us something comparable to the Word 
of God, which was written by plain and generally speaking unlet- 
tered men ? Because it was the Word of God, and the men who 
wrote it were merely his instruments. Then, addressing himself 
very earnestly to the young ladies of the Senior Class, he urged 



The Academy. 2429* 

them to consider in what relation they stood to the Book ; to see 
that it prove a lamp to their feet and a light to their path ; to take 
it as a guide and chart to study ; to love the Book and order their 
lives according to its plain, simple, holy precepts. Dr. Strick- 
ler's sermon made a profound impression ; its very simplicity 
made it plain to every listener and its calm, unanswerable logic car- 
ried conviction to every mind." 

At the conclusion of the sermon Miss Morrison sang, with 
her best effect, ' ' The Lord is my Light. ' ' 

Dr. Strickler and a few invited friends dined with the Grad- 
uating Class in the school refectory. 

SENIOR CLASS DAY, 

The exercises of Senior Class Day were,, in some respects,, 
unique this year ; especially was this true of the morning program. 
The gifted reporter of the Sentinel gave so excellent a sketch off 
this occasion that we again copy : 

Planting of the Class Tree. 

' ' This morning at eleven o' clock the very bright and interest- 
ing exercises attending the planting of the Class Tree took place. 
This afforded perhaps a more delightful glimpse into the inner 
every-day life of the college girls than any other public exercise,, 
reflecting as it does their personality, their fun and mirth-loving- 
propensities, toned, nevertheless, to the sober significance that must 
go with any real planting, whether it be in the plant world, or the 
world of human life and activity. 

' ' In Main Hall the sweet-girl graduates, in classic cap and 
gown, accompanied by their marshals, Misses Nellie Fries and 
Louise Bahnson from the Freshmen, Rachel Borden and Cam- 
mie Lindley from the Sophomores, Mary Gudger and Mary 
Culpepper from the Juniors, preceded by Miss Pauline Sessoms,. 
bearing the lovely new class banner, wended their way in stately- 
procession on to the campus where the beautiful exercises of plant- 
ing the Class Tree took place. 

' ' A large crowd was gathered to witness the interesting cere- 
mony, which began with the singing of a song breathing loyalty 
and love, entitled, 'Dear Old S. F. C. ,' followed by another, as> 
bright and witty as possible, which ran thus :: 



:2.430 The Academy. 

■ ' ' Where, Oh. where are the green young Freshmen ? 

Safe in the Sophomore Class. 
They're all through with tough old Caesar, 

Safe in the Sophomore Class ! 

" Where, O where are the bold, bad Sophomores? 

Safe in the Junior Class. 
They're all through with Bergen's Botany, 

Safe in the Junior Class ! 

•" Where O where are the love-sick Juniors? 

Safe in the Senior Class. 
They went up on Shakespeare's Hamlet, 

Safe in the Senior Class ? 

"Where, O where are the stately Seniors? 

Safe in the world at last. 
They're all through with Alma Mater, 

Safe in the world at last ! 

" Bum bum bi, we'll go to meet her, 

Safe in the world at last. 
Now, three cheers for Alma Mater, 

Safe in the world at last ! 

" Dr. Clewell then made a brief and timely talk, abounding 
'in kind and gracious sentiments and expressions of interest for the 
iSeniors now passing out ' into the world at last !' 

"The tree was then planted, each young lady of the Graduat- 
ing Class, with Miss Lehman, Bishop Rondthaler and Dr. 
Clewell taking a hand. 

' ' Then followed a rousing class yell, very modestly given, be 
it said with entire truthfulness. 

"The closing address by Bishop Rondthaler was as beauti- 
ful and touching as any this gifted speaker has ever made, and as 
"he gracefully closed, he told the legend of the sibyl who wrote her 
prophecies upon leaves, and scattered them to the breeze. Picking 
up some leaves of the Class Tree which had fallen at his feet, he 
•said with his prophecy for them written upon these leaves would be 
.another legend for each, and that would be, " God bless you all," 
.and saying which the leaves floated away as from the hand of an old 
world sybil in the long ago. 



The Academy. 2 431 

"The last song was the noted 'Integer Vitae, ' of Horace, 
sung with great effect in the Latin words. 

' ' The songs were accompanied by an Orchestra composed of 
members of the Men's League, Salem, and the ladies were ably- 
assisted in the tree planting by a number of young gentlemen from 
this organization. The tree was a handsome maple, donated from 
the League Campus. 

' ' Immediately after the exercises the Seniors with a few friends 
repaired to the hospitable home of Dr. and Mrs. Clewell where 
a beautiful luncheon, which carried out in every detail the class 
colors, olive and old gold, was served. A happier party of young 
people could hardly be imagined, and the Class of 1903, will always 
have the tenderest, sweetest memories of the class tree planting and 
the delightful entertainment by the Principal and his gracious charm- 
ing wife. ' ' 

seniors' exercises. 

It was a bright and attractive sight which greeted the many 
visitors to the Academy Chapel on Monday afternoon. The Seniors 
were all seated on the platform, with a bank of tastily arranged 
daisies between them and the audience. The exercises consisted of 
a number of essays on selected topics and instrumental music. The 
latter was with four pianos and the grand organ, and was peculiarly 
bright and inspiring. Miss Lehman directed the occasion. 

The Essays were as follows : Class Ivy, by Miss Amy Sloan, 
New York. Class History, by Miss Sadie Rollins, North Car- 
olina. Class Prophecy, by Misses Adah Petway, Georgia, Bessie 
Sloan, New York, and Hannah Dewey, North Carolina. Presen- 
tation of the Class Banner, Miss Pauline Sessoms, Georgia. This 
latter ceremony was the first of its nature connected with a gradua- 
tion occasion. The banner made up of olive green and old gold 
material, with the letters "V. A. O," (we should try to succeed 
by merit) was placed upon the wall, and was concealed from the 
sight of the audience by a screen. At the proper time the screen 
was dropped and the beautiful banner appeared, and was greeted 
by loud applause. Many complimentary things were said regard- 
ing this occasion, as well as the morning exercises, and hence the 
.Seniors of 1903 may well consider their day a brilliant success. 



2432 , The Academy. 



OPENING CONCERT. 



During the afternoon the intense spell of heated weather was 
broken by a rain and hail storm, and hence the clear evening, with 
cool temperature and all nature refreshed by the shower, invited a 
large company to enjoy the Opening Concert. Again we quote the 
kindly written criticism of a visiting friend : 

' ' The opening concert last night more than realized the ex- 
pectations of those who remembering former opening concerts went 
expecting to have a delightful evening. Every number on the pro- 
gramme, as is the way with Academy functions, went through with 
a smoothness and finish that always bring great satisfaction to an 
audience. Indeed, it can be undeniably said of every entertainment 
and undertaking given or entered upon by the Academy, its pupils 
and management, that there will be no break, no omission ; nothing 
to mar the exquisite sense of fitness and finish that must character- 
ize every entertainment which measures up to the true significance 
of the word. 

"All the members were liberally applauded, the reading by 
Miss Lita Young, the vocal duet by Misses Petway and Bulluck 
and "Heart's Delight," by Miss Corinne Baskin, winning espe- 
cially appreciative plaudits." 

alumnae day. 

According to the plans of the officers of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion, the annual meeting was held in the Moravian Church, and 
consisted of a Moravian Lovefeast. This religious service of fellow- 
ship was intended to refresh the memory of former days and recall 
to the visiting Alumnae the similar services which they had attended 
as pupils, and to bind together in a friendly spirit the school, the 
home alumnae, as well as the visiting friends and former scholars. 
A specially prepared Ode was used. Bishop Rondthaler pre- 
sided, and during the exercises the officers rendered their reports. 
The following account of the meeting was given by the Journal : 

"The business session was presided over by Mrs. Lindsay 
Patterson, and was a most enjoyable meeting, showing that a 
great work had been done by the Association during the past year. 
The reports of the Secretary and Treasurer were very gratifying. 



The Academy. 2433 

By the Treasurer's Report it was shown that during the past twelve 
months about $2,000 had been added to the building fund of the 
new Memorial Hall. The collection in the meeting, with the recent 
liberal gifts and the receipts from the Grand Concert swelled the 
.amount to about $10,000. 

' ' An interesting feature of the business session was the reading 
of a letter from Mr. H. E. Fries to the Association, which was, in 
part, as follows : 

"'To the perpetual memory of Rosa Mickey Fries (the 
sweetest singer of all singers to me) I wish to subscribe the sum of 
five hundred dollars as the nucleus of a fund to be known as the 
Memorial Hall Organ Fund. This gift is to be recognized as a 
tribute of affection to her teachers and dear old Alma Mater. 

' ' ' Respectfully, 

" ' Henry E. Fries.' 

' ' This tender tribute of love from a husband to a devoted wife 
made a deep impression upon the meeting. The enthusiasm was 
•great and though the exercises were of a religious nature the audience 
Droke into a. hearty applause. 

' ' Bishop Rondthaler' s address was one of his strong, force- 
ful efforts. He spoke of the small beginning which has finally 
culminated in the handsome figure which the building fund has now 
attained. He further said that the school had done so much for the 
entire Southland that he advised the ladies not to hesitate to ask 
any one, at home or abroad, for aid in this great work. The South- 
land has received so much benefit from the Academy in training 
the minds of its young ladies that it should feel a debt of gratitude 
to the noble womanhood of the South so great that they should 
■complete the building proposed, the Memorial Hall. 

"Mrs. General Henry, of New York, spoke of an effort she 
"hoped to put forth in New York city during the winter. The pro- 
posed effort will probably take the form of a musical to be given at 
the Waldorf-Astoria. She feels certain that Governor Odell and 
other prominent New York people will become patrons of the un- 
dertaking. With the assistance of such gentlemen who are in sym- 
pathy with Southern interests it is hoped to arouse the patriotism 
of the Southern colony in the great metropolis. ' ' 

The contributions of the afternoon will be found elsewhere in 
this number, under the liead " Acknowledgments." 



2434 The Academy. 

The election of officers, together with the later appointment of 
the Executive Committee, was as follows : 

President — Mrs. Lindsay Patterson, Winston, N. C. 
1st Vice President — Mrs. E. A. Ebert, Salem, N. C. 
2d " " — Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston, N. C. 

3d " " — Mrs. Nelson Henry, New York City. 

4th " " — Mrs. Luther Clark, Dallas, Texas. 

5th " " — Mrs. Frank Mebane, Spray, N. C. 

Secretary — Miss Adelaide L. Fries, Salem, N. C. 
Treasurer- Miss Louisa C. Shaffner, Salem, N. C. 

Executive Committee. 

Mrs. John H. Clewell, Mrs. H. E. Fries, Mrs. J. D. Laug- 
enour, Mrs. Wm. Peterson, Mrs. F. H. Fries, Mrs. J. Ken- 
neth Pfohl, Miss Bessie Pfohl, Miss Etta Shaffner, Miss 
Ada Fogle, Salem ; Mrs. George Norfleet, Mrs. W. T. Brown, 
Mrs. John Coleman, Mrs. A. B. Gorrell, Mrs. James Sloan, 
Mrs. H. Montague, Miss May Barber, Winston : Mrs: Oscar 
Sheppard, Waughtown ; Mrs. Egbert Lehman, Miss Kate 
Jones, Bethania. 

THE GRAND CONCERT. 

The Grand Concert was attended by a large and appreciative 
audience. The numbers were all carried out as printed on the 
programme. The stage presented a beautiful picture, filled with 
the attractively dressed college girls. The Salem Orchestra occu- 
pied the space immediately in front of the platform. 

We have already spoken of the strength of the various depart- 
ments, under the care of Prof. Shirley, Miss Vest, Miss Acker- 
man and others, and in this concert the strength of the work ap- 
peared. This was true of the piano and organ music, the vocal 
selections, the elocution and the chorus work. It is, of course, not 
proper for The Academy to comment on the excellence of indi- 
vidual performers, since the interest we feel is deeper than that 
which rests on the various grades of the work ; but it is safe to say 
that seldom is a stronger programme presented to the public, and 
both teachers and performers are to be congratulated on the success 
of the occasion. 

We regret that all the programmes of the week cannot be'given 



The Academy. 2435' 

i 
but our limited space forbids. In order that our readers may have 
an idea of the character of the numbers offered to the public we: 
give the programme of the Grand Concert, Prof. HI A> Shirley,. 
Director : 

The New Hail Columbia Chadwick' 

Chorus and Orchestra. 
Miss Alice Rose, Organist. 

Piano Quartet. Magic Fire Music. " The Valkyrs " . Wagner- 

Misses Mary Benton, Lora Ferrell, Edna Wilson 
and Martha Petty. 

Reading. The Sweet Girl Graduate . . .Phelps 

Miss Mabel V. Traxler. 

Song. When Thou Art Near Me Lohr' 

Miss Adah Aileen Petway. 

Piano Duo. Allegro Scherzando from Concerto. Op. 22.6V. Saens~ 
Misses Leonora Johnston and Rosa Hege. 

Reading. Very Dark Anow 

Miss Mattiella Cocke. 

Organ Solo. Variations on an American Air .Flagler 

Miss May Barber. 

Song. Chanson Provencale Dell ' Ac qua 

Miss Maude Bulluck. 

Piano Solo. Cracovienne Fantastique. Op. 14, No. 6 . . Paderewski 
Miss Ethel Jeter. 

Reading. Guido Ferranti . Oscar Wilde 

Miss ACKERMAN. 

Overture to ' ' Rienzi " Wagner' 

Misses Ivy Nicewonger, Ruby McCorkle, 

Eva Harris and Mary Bailey. 

Mr. Shirley at the Organ. 

Chorus. Gallia Gounod 

Miss Morrison, Soloist. Miss Amy Van Vleck, Pianist. 
Miss Aline Roueche, Organist. 
Assisted by Salem Orchestra, Mr. W. J. Peterson, Leader. 
First Violins— S. E. Peterson, W. P. Ormsbv, C. Watson. Second Vio- 
lin— James Kapp Viola— Bernard Wurreschke Double Bass — 
B J. Pfohl, Flute — W. L Skewers. Clarinet — S. W. Tise. Cornet— J. 
E. Peterson. Baritone— H. F Mickey. 
Academy Chorus assisted by Mesdames H. E. Fries, F. W. Stockton, 
Sprinkle, Vogler ; Misses B. Leinbach, L. Leinback, Lichten- 
thaeler, Traxler, Vance— Sopranos. Mesdames Boozer, H. Crist; 



^436 The Academy. 

W. J. Peterson, Sumner and Miss R. Hege — Altos. Messrs. F. A. 
Barr, C Crist, J. Dean, C. A. Jenkins, Lichtenthaeler, F. W. 
Stockton, F Vogler— Tenors. . Messrs. Brickenstein, H. Crist, 
Ebert, VV. Hege, R. Siewers, C. Thaeler — Basses. 

THE ART EXHIBIT. 

The Art Exhibit was open to the public on Friday evening 
"before Commencement, and also on several occasions during Com- 
ment week itself. The same able writer whom we have several times 
quoted, has the following to say of the Art Exhibit : 

' ' The Art Exhibit and reception given last evening in Society 
Hall under the direction of Miss Siedenberg, the accomplished 
teacher of Art in the Academy, was a pronounced success. After 
the exhibit delicious refreshments were served and the evening 
proved one of the most enjoyable of the many that will mark Com- 
mencement. But a visit to the Art rooms by daylight, with Miss 
Siedenberg as guide and cicerone will afford a world of pleasure 
,and information not otherwise available. The art class has been 
large this year, in the departments of oil, china, glass and water 
color. By beginning with the drawing from casts and still life, and 
going on from room to room, it is easy to mark the splendid prog- 
ress the pupils make under Miss Siedenberg' s skillful guidance and 
instruction. Among the Winston girls we notice very fine work 
done by Misses Lora Ferrell, Maggie Jones and Lillian Burk. 
The China Painting of Miss Bessie Sloan consisting of a tankard 
. and four steins, is exceptionally fine; Miss Bessie Warren's tea 
set in roccoco style is very, very beautiful and artistic. The Glass 
-Painting is by odds the most beautiful ever shown in this branch ; 
Miss Query's vase bowl and Miss Henderson's set of tumblers, 
and the work done by Miss Pauline Sessoms are specially note- 
worthy. Among others who have done themselves and their teacher 
•the highest credit are Miss Ruth Willingham in water color ; 
Miss Henrietta REiDin oil ; Miss Maud Bulluck in water color ; 
Misses Mary Frost, Lucy lReavis, Chisman and others in oil 
painting. It is unusual to -see an exhibit combining so many char- 
. acteristics of true art as may be found in the work of these young 
students, which is characterized throughout by delicacy of touch, 
unity of design, and the wise. subordination of detail to a perfectly 
. harmonious whole. 



The Academy. 2437 



COMMENCEMENT. 



Commencement day is one of the great, important days in life. 
Those who have studied the special preparations made in advance 
by the graduates realize this. The importance of the day appears 
in the large number of friends who visit Salem, even from far distant 
points. It appears, too, in the tender and sympathetic sentiment 
abroad in audience and in class. Tears mingle with smiles ; joy and 
sorrow blend ; such is Commencement. 

The weather was propitious on Commencement morning. The 
decorations were beautiful. These exquisite decorations are a feature 
of Commencement which will long be remembered by those who 
were present. 

The Academic procession was made up of three sections. The 
first was led from Main Hall to the church by Judge Connor and 
Dr. Clewell, and consisted of the Trustees of the School, the 
ministers of the Twin City, the Mayors and Commissioners of the 
corporation, the schoolmen of the city, the members of the legal 
fraternity and the newspaper representatives. The second division 
was led by Mrs. Clewell and Miss Lehman, and consisted of the 
members of the Senior Class. The nearly two score young ladies 
bore gracefully two immense daisy chains, each perhaps 100 feet 
long. The third division was made up of members of the faculty 
and of the School. 

As the Marche Solenelle was being played by Prof. Shirley 
on the grand old organ which has done service for more than a 
century, the procession moved up the two aisles of the church, and 
' ' found their places on the dais which was more effective and beau- 
tiful than ever, in its garniture of lillies and ferns. ' ' 

Dr. Clewell presided on this occasion. After the inspiring 
" Sanctus from St. Cecilia," by Gounod, had been sung, with 
orchestral accompaniment, Rev. James E. Hall read a selection from 
the Holy Scriptures, and led in prayer. Miss Katharine Kil- 
buck, the Class President, sang "The Plains of Peace," Barnard. 

The orator of the occasion was Judge H. G. Connor, of the 
Supreme Court. As a mark of respect to this eminent jurist Judge 
Neal had adjourned the Superior Court, then in session in Winston, 
and he inutrodced the speaker in a happy and cordial manner. 



2438 The Academy. 

The Oration was a scholarly effort, as one who was present 
remarked, it was as chaste and classical as it was forceful and earn- 
est. It was a masterly piece of calm, effective oratory, and its les- 
sons will abide in the memory of those who were so fortunate as to 
hear him. His subject was "Woman's duty to woman in the 
future." The speaker pictured the position of woman in early 
days, and in our own day and time. He spoke of the two great 
classes of ' ' bread winners ' ' and those in affluent circumstances, and 
discussed their mutual relations and obligations. In concluding his 
address Judge Connor said : ' ' The future is full of promise ; ours is 
a favored land. We have but to be loyal to our highest and best, 
truest and purest selves, to preserve the high types of manhood and 
womanhood. Simplicity in taste and life, elevation in thought and 
high standards of morals, respect for and preservation of woman- 
hood, faith in the infinite wisdom and superintending providence in 
the God of our father, love of home, purity of life and patriotic 
devotion and service to our country and its institutions, will bring to 
us and to those who shall come after us the largest rewards and the 
most abundant blessings. As you, young ladies, go forth to your 
homes certified of your exemplary conduct, faithful performance of 
duty and intellectual attainments, carry with you the precept and 
example of the faithful men and women who have watched over you 
in this institution. Keep in close touch with your sisters. Make all 
lives with which you come in contact happy, and your reward will 
be in your own happiness. 

" Bishop Roxdthaler, before awarding the fifty-two diplomas 
made a most pleasing address, speaking gracious words of appre- 
ciation and kindness, not only to Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, whose 
noble work stands so as to be seen and known of all men, but to 
the efficient corps of teachers and to those whose service in even less 
conspicuous places have contributed so much to the great and grat- 
ifying results of the year. ' ' 

The names of the Graduates are as follows : 

Collegiate Department. — Misses Mary Adelaide Bailey, 
Hattie Lisette Brewer, Delphine Brown, Adah Du Val 
Clarke, Mary Ellen Clark, Mattiella Cocke, Eleanor 
Elizabeth Crist, Hannah Manette Dewey, May Brown- 
field Follin, Maud Inez Foy, Grace Trueman Hanes, 



The Academy. 2439 

Louise Foley Harper, Bessie May Hughes; Katharine 
Henry Kilbuck, May Brevard McMinn, Susie Gaines Nunn, 
Carrie Lillian Ogburn, Adah Aileen Petway, Lucy Etta. 
Reavis, Henrietta Settle Reid, Sadie Maie Rollins, 
Bertie Estelle Russell, Lena McDuffie Sessoms, Louise 
Pauline Sessoms, Estelle Henri Shipley, Amy Rogers 
Sloan, Elizabeth Bryan Sloan, Mabel Agnes Spaugh, Liz- 
zie Pearl Stipe, Julia Matilda Stockton, Annie Mary Vest,, 
Lela Agnes Vest, Annie Lea Walker, Metta Lindsay Wat- 
son, Retta Flora Wesloskey, Mary Elliott Wood, Lita. 
Young. —37. 

Instrumental Music. — Miss Rosa Estelle Hege, Annie: 
Louise Lichtenthaeler, Annie Elizabeth McKinney, Car- 
rie Olivia Speas. — 4. 

Book-keeping. — Misses Ida May Drew, John Agnes Fara- 
bee, Sarah Rachel Hollingsworth. Margaret Mickle,. 
Rachel James Petty, Mattie Florence DeShazo. — 4. 

Phonography. — Misses Ethel De Vane Dunlap, John- 
Agnes Farabee, Hannah Manetta Dewey. 

Domestic Science. — Miss Retta Flora Wesloskey. 

Elocution. — Miss Mabel Virginia Traxler. 

After a vocal duet by Misses Morrison and Lineback, the 
beautifnl and touching ceremony of. the transfer of the Oxford Cap 
and Gown from the Senior to the Junior Class took place. The 
Senior Class was represented by Miss Kilbuck, the Presidsnt, and 
Miss Ogburn, the Vice President, and, after an appropriate address 
by these two, in a few well chosen words. Miss Brietz Thom 
received the emblems of class supremacy in the name of the incom- 
ing Senior Class. 

The Commencement Exercises were closed with the doxology 
and benediction. 

In the afternoon Dr. and Mrs. Clewell held a reception in 
the Principal's Home, and they were assisted by Bishop and Mrs. 
Rondthaler, Judge Connor and Col. F. H. Fries. Many visitors 
and patrons called., and the pupils came in groups to say good bye 
before starting on their journey home. 

Thus happily and successfully closed the Commencement sea- 
son, at which so many friends and patrons were present, which was 
so successful in all respects, and which closed the first year in the 
new century. 



2440 The Academy. 

Alumnae Memorial Hall. 



The gifts received for this cause since the. publication of our last 
number are as follows : 

Mrs. Mary Love String-field, $5.00 ; Misa Florence C. Gaither, 
$5.00 ; St. Cecelia Concert, under the direction of Mrs. Sprinkle, 
$22.65 ; Miss Sallie Vest, 85.00 ; Mrs. L. M. Fries, in memory of 
her mother, Mrs. Christina Vogler and Mrs. Louisa Vogler Sense- 
man, $500.00 ; Mrs. W. C. Wright, $5.00 ; Mrs. W. T. Carter, 
$5.00 ; Miss Lizzie Fitzgerald Perkinson, $5.00 ; Centennial Cele- 
bration Committee, 8128.34; Mrs. Lindsay Patterson, $5.00; "A 
box" from a friend, $1.45 ; Mrs. A. D. Mickle, 81.00 ; Miss Robbie 
Mickle, 81.00 ; the Asheville Branch, gifts from the following five 
ladies : Mrs. Cordie Barnard, $10.00, Mrs. Malloy, $10.00, Mrs. 
Tighe, $10.00, Mrs. Sevier, 810.00, Miss Dovie Chedester, $5.00; 
Bethania Branch, $16.00 ; Mr. L. B. Brickenstein, $25.00 ; Miss M. 
E. Vogler, $5.00; Miss Bessie Pfohl, $1.00; Miss Maggie Pfohl, 
$1.00 ; Miss Claudia Winkler, 50 cents ; Mrs. T. H. Pegram, $1.00 ; 
Mrs. Nelson Henry, $25.00 ; Mrs. J. Minor, $1.00 ; Cash at Alumnae 
Meeting, (no names given) $46.60 ; Grand Concert, $99.50. 

Paid to date, $9,503.18. Add the more than $500.00 sub- 
scription and the sum total exceeds $10,000.00. From the cash 
given above deduct amount paid out for work on Hall, etc. , $389.77, 
leaves net on hand, $9,113.41. 

The liberal gift of Mrs. L. M. Fries, her check for $500.00, 
came as a great encouragement to all who are working for the Hall. 

Mr. H. E. Fries subscription of $500.00 as the beginning of a 
grand organ fund, was the beginning which will no doubt place in 
position in the future an instrument well worthy of the great 
Auditorium. 

By the end of June the excavation for basement and foundation 
was complete. 



— The statistics in the new Catalogue show that the following 
are the numbers. General registration, teachers and pupils 382 ; 
Music Department 304 ; Art Department 48 ; Industrial Depart- 
ment 43 ; Languages, private instructor, 28 ; Commercial Depart- 
ment 15 ; Elocution Department 62 ; Home Nursing, 5. 



The Academy. 2441 

The Faculty of the past Year. 



The following is a list of the persons who were engaged in 
teaching in Salem Academy and College during the past year : 

Rev. J. H. Clewell, Ph. D. , Mrs. J. H. Clewell, Bishop 
Rondthaler, Prof. Shirley, Mr. C. B. Pfohl, Prof. Tilling- 
hast, Miss Emma Lehman, Miss Louisa C. Shaffner, Miss 
Sallie Shaffner, Miss Emma'Chitty, Miss Carrie Jones, Miss 
M. Bessent, Miss A. Siedenber, Miss Clara Query, Miss 
Adalyn Ackerman, Miss Sarah L. Vest, Miss Ethel Jeter, 
Miss Georgia Rights, Miss Amy Van Vleck, Miss Leonora 
Johnston, Miss Jani»: Lewis, Mrs. H. E. Rondthaler, Miss 
May Barber, Miss Luda Morrison, Miss Emma C. Bonney, 
Miss Z. LaPorte, Miss E. Henderson, Miss Lizzie Heis ,er, 
Miss Carrie Vest, Miss Mamie Lewis, Miss Hennie Peterson, 
Miss .Mabel Butner, Miss Mary Greider, Miss Emma Staf- 
ford, Miss Mabel Traxler, Miss Otelia Barrow, Miss Carrie 
Speas, Miss Annie McKinney, Miss Emma Smith, Miss Mary 
Meinung, Miss Mamie Kapp. 



— We often feel that it would be a pleasure to our friends to 
read some of the kind expressions contained in the letters from 
patrons and former pupils. The following extract will show how 
warm is the feeling in many instances. A patron writes : ' ' Your 
letter is not only gratifying, but a source of great pleasure to me. I 
cannot command words to express my gratitude for your friendship 
to both of us, and each day I am more impressed thasyouand your 
School have implanted a foundation in the case of my child which 
will bring to me the greatest of all earth' s happiness. ' ' 

— At the close of School the entire Day School Department 
was enfertained by Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, in the Refectory. After 
refreshments had been served addresses were made and all had a 
good time. 

—We acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to attend the 
formal dedication of the New Professional School Building of the 
North-Western University. 



"2442 The Academy. 

The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



These Departments have given place to the account of Com- 
mencement. Both Societies closed the year in a happy manner, 
and can look back to a prosperous record. The closing event in 
the Euterpean Society was the arrival of the officers' chairs. They 
are beauties. Large, ornamental, finely finished, of original design, 
they add greatly to the beauty of the hall. The Hesperians were 
equally happy over the receipt of their fine new upright piano. The 
finish of the case corresponds with the finish of the woodwork of the 
hall, and in tone and power it is all that could be desired. Thus each 
Society has closed the term in a manner befitting the success of the 
year. 

The officers elected are as follows : 

HESPERIAN. 

President — Miss Mary Culpepper. 

Vice President — Miss Brietz Thom. 

Secretary — Miss Nataline HayniS. 

Critic — Miss Florence Moorman. 

Chaplain — Miss Ruth Matthews. 

Treas. and Librarian — Miss Cammie Van Lindley. 

EUTERPEAN. 

President — Miss Mary B. GudgeR. 

Vice President — Miss Frances G. Powers. 

Secretary — Miss Agnes Belle Goldsby. 

Critic — Miss Lila Little. 

Chaplain — Miss Elizabeth J. Bowden. 

Librarian — Miss Emma B. Greider. 

Treasurer — Miss Corinne Baskin. 



— The members of the Art School went on frequent expeditions 
into the neighborhood nature sketching. 

— A very enjoyable open air service was held at 8 a. m., in 
iront of Main Hall, on July 4th. 

— Miss May Butner has been teaching near her home at 
Stony Ridge, N. C, and Miss Elizabeth Davis near Oxford, N. C 



The Academy. 2443 

Gtfjronicle anfi (JNssty. 



— Mr. Pfohl started on his visitation trip early in July. 

— Prof. Shirley is spending his vacation in New England. 

— The Journal 1 s special Easter editfon was well written and the 
views unusually good. 

— Rev. W. H. Vogler, of Indianapolis, was with us some weeks 
ago ; and addressed the School in Vesper service. 

— Bishop Rondthaler visited the Synod convened in Beth- 
lehem, Pa. , the latter part of May. 

— Misses Lou and Sallie Shaffner and Miss Bonney are 
attending the Summer School at Knoxville, Tenn. 

— Ths Salem Boys' School Commencement followed the close 
of the Academy, and the occasion was one of unusual interest. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Clewell have moved into the School for the 
Summer. This makes the life of the vacation girls more homelike. 

— The alligators are growing nicely, and John, Jr. , has so won 
their affection by the regular supply of beef steak that they come at 
his call. 

— The stone wall on the west side of the Cedar Avenue is now 
complete. It was a great undertaking but it adds much to this 
beautiful spot. 

— Rev. H. E. Rondthaler and family left for Bethlehem, Penn., 
July*2nd, where they will enter upon their new duties in the Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

— The weeping willow beside the fountain is growing rapidly 
and by September will again be a thing of beauty, after its appar- 
ently ruthless trimming. 

— The Juniors had a trolley ride tendered them by Dr. and 
Mrs. Clewell, May 14th. After the ride they were entertained in 
the Principal's home. 

— The new Campus, east of Annex Hall, is assuming its final 
shape. It will add to the beauty of the grounds, and will give the 
pupils more space for games. 



2444 The Academy. 

— The promotion cards were given to the Juniors the last day of 
School. The Class gathered in the Library with thefr teachers. It 
was an anxious time for some. 

— The Concert given by Miss Claude Winkler In the Acad- 
emy Chapel, June 30th. was a marked success. It was for the ben- 
efit of the Home and the Hospital. 

— The ' ' Goose Party ' ' given on the Academy Campus for the 
benefit of Alumnae Hall was a success in every way and a snug sum 
was realized for the building fund. 

— Miss Buford's reports of the Commencement in the .Sentinel, 
were written in the best style of this accomplished writer and were 
read with great pleasure by her friends. 

— The Seniors' Picnic to Old Town, May 12th, was a great 
success. It required four or five wagons to accommodate the Class. 
The outing was one of the great successes of the year. 

— The close of Clemmons School was a pleasing and successful 
occasion. The Principal, Rev. J. Kenneth Pfohl, has received and 
accepted a call to take charge of Christ Church in Salem. 

— Miss Query is at present in the Maryland Hospital. She has 
decided to become a professional nurse. The Academy extends its 
best wishes, feeling assured that she will make a success of her 
chosen profession. 

— The pupils remaining during the Summer are as follows : 
Misses Bessie Bowdon, Ida Richard, Hattie Richard, Kath- 
leen Griffith, Helen Wilde, Jennie Wilde, Dorothy 
Prevatt, Rebecca Ladd, Doris Bury, Lucille Bury, Ruth 

KlLBUCK. 

— Dr. Clewell made a hasty trip North immediately after the 
close of School. He attended the Moravian Synod at Bethlehem, 
and visited Linden Hall, Lititz, Penn. He also called at the homes 
of quite a number of pupils. In Pennsylvania he visited Isabelle 
and Louise Rice, Kathleen Tay, Ora Hunter and Anna 
Bahnson's parents. In New Jersey he dined with Marie Rey- 
nold's. In New York with Amy and Bessie Sloan, where he met 
Anna McPherson. In Virginia, he spent a day with Florence 
and Corinne Moorman, and in North Carolina, called upon Eva 
Harris, Annie Mckinney, Henrietta Reid and Annie 
Walker. 

— A Friend wishes to dispose of a good second-hand Piano. 
Apply at the Academy office for information. 



The Academy. 2445- 



HISTORY OF WACHOVIA 

IN NORTH CAROLINA. 
By Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 4.00 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title 
Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 
sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils • 
will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 
carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure 

The Charlotte Observer publishes an extended review of the above 
work, concluding with the following lines : 

"A very instructive chapter comes near the close of the volume, giv- 
ing a history of the Moravian Church, or " TJnitas Fratrum," as they styled 
themselves. The last chapter gives a sketch of the lives of the eleven 
Principals of Salem Academy and Col e^e, from Samuel Kransch, in 1802, 
down to the present incumbant. This chapter is written by Miss Lehman, 

•' We are still indebted to Dr. Clewell for giving us the history of this 
unique and interesting people. Whoever has visited o d Salem, and seen 
its unique houses, its shaded groves, its vener ble graveyard with recum- 
bent tombstones, its church with its beautiful andimpressive ceremony, its 
venerable gr <veyard with recumbent tombstones, its church with its beau- 
tiful and impressive ceremony, its far famed schools, its evidences of thrift 
and sobriety, whoever has seen all these things has wished that he might 
learn more of the simple, earnest, Christian people that hnve builded here 
so well. 

"Dr. Clewell has made judicious use of his sources in writing this his- 
tory, and has told his story in a st aightforward, scholarly manner. He has- 
evidently gone th ough with much pa ient and laborious research in the 
prosecution of his task. The result, a handsomely bound volume in cloth 
and gold, stands very much to his credit, and is a cause for just pride both. 
to himself ^nd the people he represents." 

Address, Rev. J.. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem N. C. 



2446 




The Academy. 

James S. Dunn. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Corresftonde?ice solicited- 



m 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream Puffs. ~) 20 cts. 
Crescents, >■ pt-r 
Cup Cakt-s, J dozen. 



Vanilla Wafers, ~) 10 cts. 
Kisses, v per 

Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



£wej?y 



m lea MUs* 



The Academy. 2447 

Schouler's Department Store 

Millinery Department. 

It gives us pleasure to announce to our friends and 
patrons that we are sole Agents in this section of the 
country for Phipps & Atchison, the celebrated Ladies 
Hatters of the fashionable world. 

Shoe Department. 

We have secured the Agency for the celebrated 
" Sorosis " Shoes for Women, " Nough Sed." 

Dress Goods Department. 

This Department is stocked with the largest, most 
complete and best selected stock of Fabrics ever brought 
to Winston-Salt m. 

Ladies Readymade Garment 
Department. 

In this Department you will find almost any garment 
you may wish. 

Garments Made by Man Tailors a Specialty. 

Our stock is complete in each Department and we 
feel sure we can please you Give us a trial. 

Schouler's Department Store 



2448 The Academy. 

A HEARTY WELCOME TO ALL. 

We are glad to welcome the young 
ladies of the Academy again, and to extend 
a hearty invitation to both old and new 
students to visit our Store. 

A FIRST CLASS LINE OF 

Dress Goods of Every Description. 

A complete line 3f 

.-^.--NOTIONS,---:--- 

such as every SCHOOL GIRL needs. 
Remember 6 CENTS off every ONE 
DOLLAR purchase. 

ASHCRAFT-HEGE CO., 

110 West Fourth Street, 
WINSTON -SALEM, TV. C- 



The Academy. 



2449 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
•Graduates from Classical Course enter Srate University without examination. 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for cataiosruD. 

J AS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 




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'WINSTON, 


N. C. 





HOTEL JXDZDsTIES- 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N„ C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly sup. lied 
■with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Janes ''Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



2450 The Academy. 

OUR SPECIALTIES: 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

* Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON-SALEM, W. C. 



W. 



WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 



The Academy. 2451. 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 

AID m IIP TO ME LUIS 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

ROSENBACHERS 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



.2452 The Academy. 

Oak Ridge Institute, 

OAK RIDGE, m a 

(near salem) 
FIFTY-FIRST YEAR. 



The Largest and Best Equipped FittingSchool for Young Men 
and Boys in the South. 

Prepares for the University and for the U. S. Military and Naval 
-Academies. 224 students last year. 

EXPENSES. 



to $225 pays every thing for a full year 
For Beautiful Catalogue address 

J. A. & M. H. HOLT, Pi-ins. 



"When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place vour son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County. Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful out door 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRB3TON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785.. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 

1793-The Bingham SchooI-1902-03 

Located on the Asheville Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented th s year, from Massachuseits aud Dakota 
on the North to T-^xas and Florida on th-; South. 
•$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bisghvm, Supt., Post Office, Asheville, N. C 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol.26. Winston-Salem, N. C, September, 1903. No. 231. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem. N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College ; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



lEtiitortal. 



— We extend a cordial greeting to our readers at this the open- 
ing of a new School year. Our circle of readers will be larger than 
ever during 1903-04, and we will try to make The Academy dur- 
ing this, its 28th year, a better publication than at any time in the 
past. We hope that by communications and letters, as well as by 
personal news, you will help us to attain to this end. 



— The unusually large number of new faces within the School 
imposes special responsibllites upon the management of the Acad- 
emy. With the increased numbers there is a pleasant spirit of life 
and activity abroad, which all share and enjoy. 



— The opening of two new room companies within a week after 
the beginning of School is its own comment on the new year. More 
than two hundred persons sit down to the daily meals in the dining 
hall, a number which leaves little room to spare in this bright and 
■ cheerful department of the School. 



2454 The Academy. 

— Glorious Autumn weather has been one of the features which 
has added its influence to the many other things which will tend to 
make the present year a memorable one in the history of the School. 



— The addition of Vogler Hall, notice of which is given else- 
where, marks a new departure in the work of the School. This de- 
parture is made possible because of the support of public sentiment, 
aided by the careful oversight of our interests by the town authori- 
ties, and we may add the fine spirit abroad within the School. One 
of the problems which is solved by the opening of Vogler Hall is 
the proper and pleasant provision which is thus made for post grad- 
uates and students who prefer to live a little removed from the main 
College buildings, but who desire to be an integral part of the daily 
life of the School. It is certainly a pleasant sight to note the happy 
faces as the girls go back and forth over the green sward of the 
square between the main College buildings and this latest addition to 
our School. 



— " Vogler Hall " is a name which meets the approval of every 
one. It is euphonious and also appropriate. Mr. John Vogler, 
whose name appears on the unique old knocker of the door, was a 
prominent personage in the early history of Salem, and he lived to 
the ripe old age of more than ninety years. The house' which is 
now in the possession of the School, was built by him as his resi- 
dence, and was occupied as the Vogler residence until his death. 
Hence the name " Vogler Hall," will be a pleasant revival of many 
pleasant memories in the early history of Salem. 



— We note with pleasure the fact that a number of towns and 
cities have sent to us groups of girls instead of individuals only. 
This is true of Asheville, N. C, Jacksonville, Fla. , Reidsville, N. 
C. , Washington, N. C. , Atlanta, Ga. , Concord, N. C. , Durham, N. 
C. , and other places we might name. It is usually found that in 
each one of these places some warm friend, either Alumna or patron, 
is willing to speak a kind word whenever opportunity offers, and 
when the work is supplemented by occasional visits from Principal, 



The Academy 2455 

Teacher or other representative of the School, the increased patron- 
age is the result. The continued effort in these sections and the 
similar opening in new fields from which pupils will be sent in future 
years will solve the problem of the increased numbers which are 
needed 'to carry out the plans for enlarged usefulness in the coming 
years. 



— The Academy extends a cordial welcome to the new friends 
who have been added to the Faculty for the year which we have just 
begun. May they not only find a rich field for usefulness, but our 
wish is that they may also find Salem College a most pleasant 
home. 



The New Year. 



A sufficient length of time has now elapsed to enable us to 
judge of the probable nature of the new year. There is at times a 
development which differs from the promise at the opening of the 
year, but usually the character of the year appears at the outset. 
This time the year promises to be characterized by the two features 
of large numbers and good will. The facts set forth in other places 
in this issue of our paper show that the numbers are far above the 
average year, and this gives a pleasant excitement and bustle to 
everything. The good will is apparent to every one connected with 
the School, and the abundance of this fraternal spirit has banished 
nearly all home sickness. 

A considerable number of the pupils arrived Saturday and 
Monday previous to Tuesday, the opening day. Monday evening 
a very pleasant and satisfactory meeting of the Faculty was held in 
the upper teachers' room in Main Hall. 

opening day. 

The usual stir and excitement accompanied the passing hours 
of opening day. The exercises were held in the Moravian church, 
the School occupying the pews in the center, the members of the 
Salem Boys School were seated on the north side of the church and 
the Alumnae and guests on the south side. The church was filled 
by this interesting company of young people. A specially prepared 



2456 The Academy. 

programme of hymns had been printed, and the company united in 
the singing in a very hearty and enthusiastic manner. Miss Mor- 
rison sang a solo, which added much to the enjoyment of the 
occasion. 

The oration was delivered by the Hon. R. B. Glenn. Mr. 
Glenn took for his topic : "A Noble Life and its Purposes. ' ' All 
who know Mr. Glenn can imagine how great was the pleasure of 
listening to his earnest and able address. He showed the difference 
between making a living, and making a successful life. His address 
was earnest and forceful, and was calculated to arouse noble aspira- 
tions in the minds of the young people who were present. He laid 
stress on the fact that ' ' short cuts ' ' to success were very dangerous 
and the good old fashioned way of seeking success by honest effort 
was the only true and safe way. He further pointed out to the young 
people that they had within their power immense possibilities for 
good and for evil, as they decided to use or abuse their privileges. 
He congratulated them on their special opportunities in connection 
with their school life and urged them to use them to the full extent 
of their ability. Mr. Glenn was at times humorous in his style, and 
at others earnest and impressive. His eloquence is well known and 
he was at his best before this cultured and sympathetic audience. 

After the close of the exercises in the church all the pupils re- 
paired to the class rooms and lessons for- the next day were assigned, 
and thus the 102nd annual session was begun. 

THE NEW ROOM. 

A few days after the opening it became apparent that a new 
room must be provided, hence a conference was held and it was 
decided to open a new room company, which should be called 
" Room Eight," a number which disappeared when the Juniors took 
possession of their present rooms. To do this several changes were 
necessary. The teachers' room on the second floor of Main Hall 
was changed to the second floor of South Hall, and the seniors va- 
cated the South Senior Room, and occupied the former "Upper 
Teachers' Room. ' ' Thus the new room acquired the former South 
Senior Study Parlor, and were given the southern portion of the 
Senior Dormitory, which was partitioned off for their use. Addi- 
tional accommodations were provided in other portions of the build- 



The Academy 2457 

ings, and within a brief space of time the " Eighth Room," with 
Misses Bonney and Ackerman as teachers, was in full operation, 
and every space was taken by new pupils. 

VOGLER HALL. 

Within a week from the opening it was apparent that even this 
additional space was not sufficient to accommodate the new pupils, 
and so various plans were suggested to meet the demands of the 
case. Finally it was decided to rent the large brick building at the 
south west corner of the Salem Square, which was the property and 
residence in years gone by, of Mr. John Vogler. Mr. Vogler was a 
man prominent in the development of the interests of the town, and 
reached the ripe old age of ninety-seven years. On the gilt door 
plate attached to the interesting old door knocker is the name 
' ' John Vogler, ' ' and for the reasons given above it was determined 
to give to the building the name " Vogler Hall." This is euphon- 
ious and at the same time historical, hence in future those who reside 
in the newly acquired building will be known as ' ' Vogler Hall 
Room Company." 

It required a great effort to speedily prepare the new Hall for 
the girls were already in the School, but ready hands soon painted 
the floors, ran the electric wires into the rooms, and placed carpets 
and rugs on the floor. Bed springs were brought by private con- 
veyance from High Point, and our own Iron Bed Factory rushed 
through an order for white enamel beds. The Forsyth Chair Fac- 
tory supplied the chairs and the Oakland Furniture Company soon 
sent in the cheffoniers. Thus less than a week from the time the 
decision was made to rent the building it was ready to be occupied. 

Park Hall Room Company moved into Vogler Hall, Monday 
afternoon, Sept. 21st, and this was the first time the School has used 
buildings on the west side of the Salem Square since 1853, when 
Main Hall was built in the administration of the Rev. Robert 
deSchweinitz. 

The removal of Park Hall Room Company leaves very pleasant 
accommodations for twelve or fifteen more pupils, so that those 
young ladies who may be detained in their homes, by one cause or 
another, may feel easy in starting, since we will have ample space to 
provide for their accommodation. 



2458 The Academy. 

It will be a pleasant sight to see the members of Vogler Hall 
Room Company passing back and forth across the Salem Square. 
In many larger Schools in New England the buildings are placed at 
a considerable distance, one from the other, and this is done to give 
the pupils the needed recreation, and no more attractive sight can 
be witnessed than the busy Students and Professors hurrying from 
one building to another, or perhaps leisurely strolling along when 
the tasks have have been accomplished. 

Altogether we believe Vogler Hall will be a marked addition to 
our school life. It will give us enlarged space. It will give a sep- 
arate and distinct department for the special pupils, and it will place 
another one of the buildings on the Square in the possession of the 
School. 

Thursday evening, Sept. 24th, Vogler Hall was formally open- 
ed with a religious service, Bishop Rondthaler presfding. In 
addition to the members of the Room Company and their teacher, 
Miss Heisler, Dr. and Mrs. Clewell were present. The Acad- 
emy extends to all connected with this new home its best wishes for 
a happy year. 

Thus we have sketched the experiences of the new year. With 
beautiful weather, with a happy school, with large numbers, with an 
earnest Faculty, and with the Lord's blessing evidently resting on 
the work, we begin the year and will look to him for his guidance 
and blessing even to the close. 



The Forsyth County Teachers' Institute. 



A number of our former pupils attended the Teachers' Normal 
Institute, held in our College Chapel under the direction of Prof. F. 
H. Curtis, of Burlington, N. C. , during the week from August 3rd 
to 8th. It was a fine body of teachers and 140 or more on the reg- 
ular roster, earnest, enthusiastic, eager to find out the best ways of 
doing their work and meeting their special difficulties. Prof. Men- 
denhall, now of the Clemmons' School, was an active agent in this 
meeting. His keen, incisive way of going to the heart of things 
showed a mind of no ordinary calibre. Prof. Speas, the new County 
Superintendent, made his influence to be felt, quietly, modestly and 
unobtrusively but it pervaded the whole week's work. 



The Academy. 2459 

The Sesqui-Centennial. 



The past years have witnessed a number of Centennial occa- 
sions in our section, all of which were celebrated in a worthy man- 
ner. The first one of the celebrations was in the year 1866 when 
the founding of Salem, one hundred years earlier, was the event 
commemorated by the festivities. In more recent years the one 
hundredth anniversary of the building of the Salem Home Church 
was the occasion of a delightful series of meetings in 1900, and after 
the occasion itself had passed the work of the " Centennial Com- 
mittee ' ' was of wide spread importance to congregation and schol- 
ars. Then came our Centennial in 1902, which is fresh in the minds 
of our readers. And this year, on the 17th of November, it will be 
one hundred and fifty years since the first settlers arrived in Betha- 
bara, six miles north of Salem. The story of this early settlement 
is no doubt unknown to many of our readers, hence we will give a 
brief outline of the same. 

It was at a time when the Moravian Church was very active in 
organizing mission work in many parts of the world and the church 
authorities desired to purchase a large tract of land where a colony 
could be established, industries begun and a center created from 
which missionary interests could be promoted. After considering 
many different places in various parts of the new and the old world, 
it was decided that some point in what is now North Carolina 'should 
be selected. A year before the settlement was begun a party of 
Moravians explored all the different sections of western Carolina, 
going almost as far west as Asheville, and nearly as far north as the 
Virginia line. Finally ' ' Wachovia ' ' tract was selected and one 
hundred thousand acres of land were purchased. 

The next year a company of a dozen men settled on this tract 
of land, arriving from Pennsylvania, Nov. 17, 1753, at 3 P. M. 

The story of their struggles and privations in this new and wild 
region reads like a romance. After they had begun to enjoy the 
blessings of their crops and had erected comfortable buildings, the 
French and Indian war was begun, and they were in the midst of 
the greatest dangers for a number of years. Later the War of the 
American Revolution came on, and their difficulties and dangers 
were even greater. Then in the time of the organization of the new 



2460 The Academy. 

republic they were very nearly banished from lands and homes, and 
thus through many trials and difficulties the section known as Wa- 
chovia has grown to be what it now is. The celebration in Novem- 
ber is intended to commemorate this event, and carefully devised 
plans are being made to signalize the event itself and to mark the 
places about which so much history clusters. The plans for this 
celebration are as follows : 

In the first place, it is proposed in each congregation to do 
something which will be a memorial of the event. One congrega- 
tion has placed a fine pipe organ in its place of worship. Another 
is erecting a steeple. Still another is covering the building with 
slate, and so on throughout the Southern Province memorials are 
being erected to this one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the 
beginning of the work in Wachovia. K 

The celebration of the occasion in November will cover several 
days. November 13th will be " Bethabara Day." The train will 
leave Salem about 9 o'clock, and return about 5 o'clock in the after- 
noon. The exercises on this day will be the dedication of the mon- 
uments which it is proposed to erect at Bethabara, and sketches will 
be read and addresses delivered relating to the events connected 
witb the early history. 

Saturday evening, Nov. 14, a meeting of the Historical Society 
will be held, when the history of the founding of Wachovia will be 
a feature of the occasion. This meeting will be public, and will, no 
doubt, be held in the Moravian Church. 

Sunday, November 15, will be Provincial Day, that is, the 
entire Province will be invited to Salem, to engage in the services 
of the day. A memorial discourse will be delivered, a lovefeast will 
follow, and the exercises of the day will close with the celebration 
of the Holy Communion. 

The last service in the series will be held at 3 o'clock, Tues- 
day, 17th, the exact day and hour when the weary and travel-worn 
band entered the hunter's hut at Bethabara. It is suggested that a 
service be held in every church in the Province, at three o'clock, 
and thus, with united prayer and praise, the one hundred and fiftieth 
anniversary be commemorated. 

The event will be signalized by more than a celebration. It is 
proposed to erect substantial monuments to mark the spots where 



The Academy. 2461 

the settlers experienced their first joys and sorrows. The Wacho- 
via Historical Society will erect a substantial monument on the lawn 
beside the church, with the names of the exploring party who 
selected the site in 1752, and the names of the first settlers in 1753. 
This will be a large granite block, suitably mounted on one or more 
massive slabs as foundation stones. 

It has been discovered that the great millstone is still at the 
place where the mill stood a century and a half ago. This will be 
taken to the town and also placed near the church, and on this will 
be fastened an iron tablet with the story of the experiences of the 
French and Indian War briefly given. In addition to this stone 
and iron tablet, the site of the stockade fort will be marked by stone 
pillars. This fort was a place of refuge from the Indians for settlers 
a hundred miles around. 

Then, too, the ground on which stood the first hut will prob- 
bly be purchased, and it is propesed to roll an immense boulder to 
the spot and on this huge rock to fasten a tablet of iron, on which 
will be told the story of the arrival and early years of the little col- 
ony. If possible a sufficient piece of land will be bought to afford 
a place for visitors and excursionists to stop when in old Bethabara. 

Thus it will be seen that the celebration will be enjoyable, but 
at the same time there will be lasting results. We may also add 
that many are praying that great spiritual blessings may be received 
during these days in addition to the enjoyments of which we have 
just spoken. 



— Dr. Clewell, accompanied by Clarence, John, Jr., and 
Reginald, made a 200-mile trip afoot through the beautiful moun- 
tain section of Western North Carolina. Mrs. Clewell accom- 
panied the party to Asheville, where the party started on the long 
tramp. They visited Mt. Mitchell, Roan Mountain, Grandfather 
Mountain, Blowing Rock, passing over the great Yohnalassa Road ; 
thence down the Yadkin River, from its source to Wilkesboro, 
where they again took the train for Salem. It was a great trip, 
educational as well as enjoyable, and all stood the journey without 
mishap or accident. Truly North Carolina can boast of the beau- 
ties of her mountain scenery which is, without doubt, the grandest 
both in altitude and panoramic view east of the Rocky Mountains. 



2462 The Academy. 

ororrcspcmtmue. 



FROM ALUMNA AND OTHER FRIENDS. 



All communications for this Department should be addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
from former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 

— Several letters have come to us during the past months which 
we would have been pleased to have published earlier, but as they 
are really just as cordial and welcome now as they would have been 
in the earlier part of the year we feel sure our readers will be inter- 
ested in perusing them. Our first is a communication from a dear 
friend in Wilmington, N. C. , who speaks of that excellent organi- 
zation "The King's Daughters," and we feel that all members of 
this society will be interested in the following letter : 

' ' There was, peahaps, no meeting held during the Centennial 
Commencement so fraught with sweet memories as was the reunion 
of old '• King's Daughters." 

" Miss Fogle was in her old place in the circle which gradu- 
ally widened and widened until all who came were made part of the 
whole, and faces somewhat older, but strangely familiar, greeted us 
with the smile of long ago. A precious gathering, a little foretaste 
of those promised reunions where ' ' severed friendships shall be 
"knitted again," where partings are no more. 

"Especially appropriate and happy was this Commencement 
occasion to gather together members of those little bands who stood, 
in the Academy, for God and may this reunion, so happily begun 
be a feature of each succeeding Commencement. 

" There was not much time left after the Alumnae Banquet to 
have an extended meeting, but a few present spoke of their spiritual 
life since they graduated and it was good to hear that they were 
King's Daughters still. 

' ' There was a desire, a beautiful desire, to put a memorial in 
the new Alumnae Chapel which would be fitting Daughters of the 
King and after considering various things it was decided to begin 
to collect funds, and when the Chapel is completed a choice of a 
memorial will be made by those King's Daughters then in the 



The Academy 2463 

Academy. Any one who has been a King's Daughter during their 
life in Salem who would like to have a share in a royal gift is invited 
to join us in this sweet privilege. 

Miss Vogler came in before our circle separated, and we said 
our mottoes and sang our dear old hymn and had a parting prayer, 
and so we separated, the links in the chain fell apart, and we went 
away. 

' ' Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, 
Lest we forget, lest we forget. ' ' 

"Jeanie Wood, Pres. '94-' 95." 

— The letters which follow each give information from former 
esteemed pupils, and we are certain that they will be a pleasant 
greeting to former companions who are scattered over the Southern 
States : 

" I have eagerly read everything that I have seen in the papers 
about dear old Salem. I certainly wish that I could have attended 
the Centennial. I was there in '71-' 72-' 73. I remember your 
wife well and the circumstances about her leaving school. She was 
in the First Room and I was in the Fourth. I was in the Second 
Room when I left. Miss Emma Lehman was one of my room 
teachers. If she is still with you ask her to write me a letter ; there 
is nothing in this world that I would appreciate more than a letter 
from her. I wrote her a letter about ten years ago, but have never 
heard from it. Tell her that I have a son, Don Strong, who spent 
two years in Manila, P. I., and was still holding a responsible posi- 
tion there when Congressman Grigg appointed him to West Point. 
Gen. Corbin cabled to him, and he came right away last summer, 
and is now a cadet at West Point. I have another son who is a 
soldier in the P. I. now. Will you please be kind enough to send 
me a copy of The Academy and a Catalogue after Commencement. 
If I possibly can I am going to send one of my daughters to you in 
three years. I sent some money several years ago, when the girls 
had the endless chain circle, but I don't know whether that is the 
hall you dedicated or not. I particularly want the paper to see if I 
can tell how many of the girls attended the Centennial that were in 
school with me. I was Allie Blocker. 

"Mrs. Allie Strong." 

Blakely, Ga. 



2464 The Academy. 

' ' A friend was asking me about your school this morning, and 
if I knew the price, &c. Of course, I spoke a good word for the 
Academy as I had been a pupil there. I offered to write for Cata- 
logue and Circulars, which I would be glad if you would send me 
as soon as possible, -and I think you may probably get a pupil. 
The girl is quite young, but think her mother is anxious to send 
her if tuition isn't too high, and she is of one of the best fami- 
lies of the place, You will remember me as Lillie Hodnett, of 
Martinsville, Va. , but am married and living here. My father's 
health got so bad that we moved south to see if a change would 
help him, and since moving he hasn't had asthma at all, and im- 
proved so much he went to work again, and now is living at Norfolk, 
Va. My mother and sister joined him there last summer after the 
big fire here had burned their home. I am happily married, and 
have a good, devoted husband. Hope you and yours are doing 
well. Remember me kindly to your family, Mr. Pfohl, Misses 
Lehman and Shaffner. With best wishes for yourself and the 
Academy, Very sincerely, 

' ' Mrs. Frank S. Moseley. ' ' 

Clinton, Sampson County, N. C. 

' ' Being an old Alumna of Salem Academy and College, I feel 
greatly interested in the Centennial celebration. I was a member 
of the Select Class of 1865, Mrs. Denke, teacher : name Emma E. 
Denton, of Laurensville, S. C. ; was married in 18(jl to John H. 
King, of Georgia ; moved to the " Lone Star" State in 1874 ; am 
the proud mother of five worthy sons and one daughter ; nearly 63 
years have silvered my hair, but, oh, how fondly in memory I live 
over again the happy days of my girlhood spent in the ' dear Alma 
Mater. The wise counsel, thorough instructions and tender, loving 
care of the dear old teachers can never be forgotten. I fear very 
few, if any, are living now that were there in 1856. 

' ' Since leaving school I have had the pleasure of meeting only 
a few of my old classmates, and often wonder how many are living 
and where they are ? 

' ' Will any of them be at the Centennial ? and will they remem- 
ber me ? To those who can attend it will be the one happy event 
of a lifetime. We that cannot will certainly be with them in spirit 



The Academy. 2465 

and wish them all the joy possible. Doubtless, many changes and 

great improvements have been made in 46 years ; we old girls would 

not know the place ; but as long as we live we will love her, and 

wish and pray for her the most abundant success and prosperity, I 

feel it a great honor to be numbered among her Alumni. 

" If it is not asking too much I enclose $1.00, with the request 

that you send me a late Catalogue and local paper containing an 

account of the Centennial celebration, and greatly oblige an old 

friend and well wisher. 

"Mrs. Emma E. King (Denton)." 

Pilot Point, Denton Co., Tex. 

' ' Your kind letter reached me some time ago, and should have 
been answered sooner. We have been all excitement for some time 
and I do not think you can guess the cause. My marriage will 
take place April 15. Cannot you come and be with us on this im- 
portant occasion ? I know we can make your visit a pleasant one. 

' ' After the ceremony we will take the train to Washington, 
D. C. , where we will reside. Later I will send you our address, 
also a paper with an account of the wedding. 

' ' I thank you for sending The Academy. I enjoy reading 
it so much. 

' ' Recently I have been helping father in his church work, with 
the music, and also in raising funds for a new organ. I am glad to 
have been able thus to aid him. 

' ' And now, with much love to all, I remain, 
' • Your fond pupil 

" Annie Vaughan." 

Tracy's Landing, Md. 



— Poor " Nannie," the pet deer, is no more. A section in the 
park, just north of the spring, was surrounded by a high wire fence, 
and about a year ago she was placed in her new home. It was 
later discovered that certain dogs were straying into the park, and 
trying to get into the enclosure in which ' ' Nannie ' ' lived. Although 
it was thought that she was safe, the contrary was true, for some 
weeks ago the dogs broke in and attacked and killed the deer. Of 
course there was great sorrow, but regrets were of no avail since 
this well known pet is now no more. 



2466 The Academy. 

liersonal Sterns. 



— We sympathize deeply with Clara Robinson, (Mrs. A. A. 
Watson) late of Baltimore, Md. , in the loss of her husband. He 
was an electrician and killed instantly by grasping a live wire. They 
have one child about 3 years of age. 

— Joy and sorrow, happiness and misery tread closely on each 
others' heels in this world of ours. We are happy to chronicle the 
marriage of Miss Mittie Taylor, of Alabama, to Mr. Ogletree, of 
Uniontown, Ala. Mittie taught school a year ago, but has now 
settled down to work in the home. Our best wishes attend them. 

— We have been very pleased during the Summer to receive 
calls from a number of our former pupils. It is a special pleasure to 
see them after years of faithful work, to see how well they are filling 
their places in this world of active usefulness. 

Among these esteemed pupils we note Mrs. John H. Leigh, 
formerly Mary Clark, of Snowdon, Ala. She was a pupil here 
30 years ago, and has now been widowed for some 3 or 4 years. 
Out of a family of 12 children she has three boys remaining. 

— Edith Philbrick, of Lowell, Mass., called to see us. She 
was visiting Winston friends, and has been teaching during the past 
months. 

— Mary McMullan, of Elizabeth City, N. C. , spent some 
time with Margaret and Frankie Hanes, of Winston. She has 
not forgotten how to talk, and is the same bright, happy girl that we 
remember very affectionately. 

— Miss Mary Critz is a trained nurse in a large female school, 
and enthusiastically devoted to her work. 

— Ida Rogers now Mrs. Jones, of Atlanta, Ga. , brought her 
daughter Laurie to the Academy as a pupil and spent a week with 
her old school friend, Mrs. Vance (Anne Pittman). 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Howell (Julia Meachum, ) of Navasote, 
Tex. , spent some time here in Salem, during the months of July and 
August, with their two little ones, Vivian and Elizabeth. They ap- 
peared to enjoy their stay greatly, and it is needless to say that we 
enjoyed having them here. 



The Academy. 2467 

— Robbie Mickle and Mary Lee Joyner are both making a 
fine record in teaching. 

— Miss Adelaide Fries with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Fries and cousin, Eleanor Fries, returned Aug. 20th, from a very- 
enjoyable European tour of several months. A postal card sent us 
from Caniston, in the lovely lake region of England, contained a fine 
picture of the tomb of John Ruskin, the great English essayist and 
art critic. It was one of these tall Gaelic or Celtic crosses on which 
was noticeably engraved the seven branched golden candlestick, 
illustrative of the seven lamps of architecture. 

— We were glad to receive letters from Pauline Sessoms, of 
Waycross, Ga. , who is now absent on a five months' European tour. 
She says : "I am the happiest girl in the world." To a girl of 
Pauline's intelligence such a journey is a continual feast of good 
• things. One letter came from London, her hotel being just oppo- 
site the British Museum. Her last was written at the Red Horse 
Tavern, Stratford-on-Avon, doubly immortalized both by Washing- 
ton Irving and by Shakespeare. 

— Mrs. F. P. Wilde, of Jamaica, West Indies, visited her 
daughters, Helen and Jennie, and her sister Mrs. Clewell, this 
summer. She enjoyed her visit very much, indeed, and after a so- 
journ of some weeks returned to Pennsylvania and Boston, Mass. , 
and thence to her home in Jamacia. When Mrs. Wilde was on 
her way to Salem she was mercifully preserved in a terrible wreck 
which occurred on the Southern Railway, in Virginia. In the col- 
lision between the two trains the car in which Mrs. Wilde and her 
little boy were riding was uninjured, but in the car immediately in 
front more than twenty people were killed and the car itself com- 
pletely demolished. It was a wonderful preservation in the midst 
of the terrors of the wreck. 

— Miss Slayden, of Asheville, spent some days in Winston- 
Salem, when she brought her niece to the Academy. 

— Miss Bessie Crist has taken a position in the Salem Boys' 
School. We wish her much success in her new and responsible 
field, and we feel certain that the faithfulness and ability which she 
always displayed while a member of our School company will bring 
to her abundant success in her new duties.. 



:2468 The Academy. 



Written for the Charlotte Observer. 

THE CALL OF THE WILD. 



A deadly weariness h' Ids me in thrall, 

Through the pent up city street, 
Till, lo! the "Call of the Wild " stirs the blood, 

As it pulses and throbs with each beat. 
Again — like the note of some sweet, shy bird, 

Comes the strange, soul-stirring call ! 
Louder and clearer it strives to be heard, 

Till it rules and dominates all. 

It calls to the woods — to the fresh, sweet woods, 

Bathed in the dewy sheen; 
It thrills and echoes in every breeze, 

Whispering through aisles of green. 
The heathery slopes, rich wi h golden rod, 

Invite with their treasures rare; 
The Orchid woos with its pure sweet breath 

Over reaches of Maiden-hair. 

'Tis the call to the hills — to the ferny dells, 

Where the red-deer lies hid in the morn 
W'hile ever and anon, so clear and shrill 

Peals the sound of the hunter's horn. 
'Tis the call of the pines — of the evergreen trees 

With their soulful, murmuring sound. * 
An imprisoned Dryad is making her moan, 

To be freed from her woody bound. 

'Tis the call of the pixies and gnomes as they dance 

' Mong the roots of the grand old trees, 
Guarding the gems that glitter and glance 

Far down amid springing leaves. 
'Tis the call of the wood pee-wee to her mate, 

As she croons a soft lullaby; 
Or the thrush as she poises on pinion fleet 

Outlined 'gainst the crimsoning sky. 

Oh, the gladness, the joy of this " Call of the Wild," 

Away from the homes of men ! 
'Tis strong as the love of friend or of child, 

As it sounds from the deep forest glen ; 
It lures to the Klondike mountains of snow, 

It woos to the distant West, 
It is borne on the winds of a sun-kissed land 

To a tragical, dream-filled Rest. 

E. A. LEHMAN. 
Winston- Sal em, N. C, Aug. 26, 1903. 



The Academy. 2469 

<Eijrmitcle anii (feosssip. 



— The Room Companies are in charge of the following teachers 
this year ; 

Seniors — Miss Lehman. 

Juniors — Miss L. C. Shaffner and Miss Vest. 

Vogler Hall — Miss Heisler and Miss Smith. 

Park Hall — Miss Winkler and Miss Rice. 

Fourth Room — Miss S. E. Shaffner and Miss Carter. 

Fifth Room — Miss Speas and Miss Kapp. 

Sixth Room — Miss Wolle and Miss Greider. 

Eighth Room — Miss Bonney and Miss Ackerman. 

Ninth Room — Miss Chitty and Miss Rouche. 

Tenth Room — Miss Bessent and Miss Wharton. 

As the Seniors and Juniors each occupy two rooms, the total 
number of rooms this year is twelve. 

The Day School Department is in charge ol Miss S. Shaffner 
and Miss Heisler. 

The Music is in charge of Prof. Shirley, Miss Morrison, 
Miss S. Vest, Miss Van Vleck, Miss Jeter, Miss Johnston, Miss 
Lewis. 

The Art Department is in charge of Miss Siedenberg. 

French is taught by Miss Thomas. 

Elocution by Miss Ackerman. 

Domestic Science by Miss Wolle. 

Care of the Sick by Miss Henderson. 

Stenography by Miss Barrow. 

The Supervision of the Library by Miss Meinung. 

German by Miss Siedenberg and Miss S. Shaffner. 

Book-keeping by Miss L. Shaffner. 

Industrial Sewing by Miss Bessent. 

In addition to the above instruction is given by Bishop Rond- 
thaler, Dr. Clewell and Miss Jones. 

The total number of teachers on the list this year is thirty-four. 

— A number of our teachers attended the summer school at 
Knoxville, Tenn. Among the number were Misses L. and S. 
Shaffner, Miss Bonney a id Miss Lewis. 



2470 The Academy. 

— The list of girls who remained in the school during the vaca- 
tion is as follows : Bessie Bowden, Helen Blanford, Ida Rich- 
ard, Hattie Richard, Lucile Bury, Dorris Bury, Rebecca 
Ladd, Kathleen Griffith, Ruth Kilbuck, Helen Wilde, 
Jennie Wilde, Dorothy Privatt. They were in charge of Miss 
Heisler a portion of the time, also Miss C. Vest and Miss Emma 
Smith. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, with their family, moved into the 
school during the vacation months, and they made Main Hall seem 
more like a home than a school building. The vacation girls, and 
the teachers who spent the summer months in the Academy, com- 
posed quite a numerous family circle. 

— Miss Mamie Lewis is this year teaching in" her home-town, 
Montezuma, Ga. 

— The new campus, east of annex, is nicely covered with grass, 
and presents a most attractive appearance. It is 200 or more feet 
long, and from 50 to 70 wide. The east side is buttressed by a 
substantial stone wall, and the ground is, in part, surrounded by a 
neat white fence. Two summer houses are conveniently located on 
this portion of the campus, in which spectators can comfortably 
watch the games as they progress in autumn and spring. Nothing 
in recent years has been added to the grounds which has had as 
marked an effect on the beauty of the already attractive grounds. 
This large level space will be used chiefly for basket ball and cro- 
quet. The lawn tennis ground has been greatly improved during 
the summer, and is now a delightful spot on which to play this fas- 
cinating game. Of course, the park is just as beautiful as ever, and 
one who is not delighted with the grounds of the Academy would 
be hard to please. 

— Mrs. Westbrook, an esteemed Alumna, brought her grand- 
child to Salem, and is spending some weeks renewing old friend- 
ships and visiting the scenes of her school-days. Mrs. Westbrook' s 
home is in Hearne, Texas. 

— Miss Bessie Brook accompanied her sister to Salem, and 
though her stay was very brief, it was a great pleasure to her many 
friends to welcome her aijain to her former school home. 



The Academy 2471 

— Mr. and Mrs. Corbin paid Salem a visit end of September, 
and it is needless to say that Ethel was happy to welcome her 
parents. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Leibert, of Bethlehem, Penn., spent a 
few days as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Brickenstein. Mrs. 
Leibert is an accomplished vocalist and sang in the chapel service 
Monday morning, September 21st. 

— Elizabeth Davis has been teaching near her home in Ox- 
ford, N. C. She writes that she greatly enjoys her duties. 

— Mrs. Aird returned to Salem early in September, and is vis- 
iting friends in the Twin-City. She is happy to see so large a num- 
ber of Jacksonville girls, and, we may add, so are we. 

Miss Minnie Lee Curtis came to Salem with her sister, at 
the opening of the term, and was the guest of the Fourth Room. 
It is a great pleasure to us to welcome our former pupils, and, judg- 
ing by appearances, the pleasure is mutual. 

— The ladies of the Alumnse Association were unusually active 
this Summer in raising funds for the Memorial Hall and incidentally 
giving pleasure to a large number of our people. Three public 
occasions were on the programme for the summer. The first was a 
' ' Goose Party. ' ' One of the attractions was a great goose which 
industriously quacked in a natural voice, and as it extended its head 
from the screen which sheltered it, took in the nickles and returned 
packages containing gifts for old and, young. The second occasion 
was a silhouette party, when the old silhouette machine of a hun- 
dred years ago was brought into use again, and many pictures were 
made for the large company of visitors. The third evening was 
signalized by a lecture by Dr. Bahnson, illustrated with stereopticon 
views. Mr. Laugenhour used his fine lime light instrument to show 
the views of Yellowstone Park. On all these evenings there were 
refreshments at moderate prices, and one of the chief features was 
the evident enjoyment of all of the visitors. The campus was bril- 
liantly lighted, and an hour or two in this lovely spot on a warm 
summer evening, with refined and congenial company, could not be 
otherwise than pleasant. 



2472 The Academy. 

— The annual day of praise and prayer for the children of the 
Moravian congregation closed this year with a service on the Acad- 
emy Campus. A very large congregation assembled, the singing 
and addresses were fine, and the numerous Japanese lanterns made 
the scene indeed a lovely one. A deep impression is made on the 
minds of both young and old by a service such as this was in the 
open air, with many bright lights and stirring music and with strong 
addresses. 

— It is with great pleasure that we acknowledge the gift to our 
College Library of the Poems of the lamented John H. Boner, by 
his wife, Mrs. Lottie Boner. Mr. Boner was a native of Salem, and 
the most highly lyric poet of our old North State. In 1883 a col- 
lection of his poems styled " Whispering Pines," was published, but 
at the time of his death March 6th, 1903, it was entirely out of 
print. It was therefore with much gratification that we received this 
neat volume, partly compiled by the author before his death, but 
published since by his devoted wife. 

The book entitled " Boner's Lyrics," was illustrated by A. G. 
Heaton, dedicated to Theo. H. Hill, of Raleigh, while the introduc- 
tion was written by another warm personal friend, Henry Jerome 
Stockard. There is a portrait of Mr. Boner on the title page, also 
a cut of the house in which he was born on what was then, in 1845, 
Salt Street, Salem, N. C. 

jf&attien. 



Martin— Riggs. — On August 6, 1903, Mr. C. M. Martin, of Moberly, 
Mo., to Miss Mamie Riggs, of Winston, N. C. 

Ogletree— Taylor —On July 15, 1903, Mr. D. L. Ogletree to Miss 
Mittie B. Taylor, of Hairston, Ala. 

Harllee— Fulmore —On July 30, 1903, in Austin, Tex., Lieut. Wil- 
liam Curry Harllee, U. S. Marine Corps, to Miss Ella Fulmore. 

Utefc. 



Matthews.— On May 24, 1903, Mrs. Antoinette C. Matthews, of 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Regennas — On Sept. 11, 1903, near Bethania, N. C, Mrs. Anna Eliz- 
abeth Regennas, who taught for a time in the Academy as Miss Anna 
Demuth, about 1855. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



Agnes Belle Goldsby — Editor-in-Chief. 



1Eti ito rial. 



— Our Editorial Staff has not yet been completed. We thought 
it best to wait at least until the next issue of our paper before 
appointing the other officers because we may find great literary 
ability among the new members of our Society. 



— Though this is not the anniversary of the New Year still as 
our new school year is yet in its infancy we extend greetings to all 
and sincerely hope that Success will place her glorious crown upon 
the furrowed brow of this season's honest toil. 



Wise and Otherwise. 



— " Live and let live" is a good maxim, but "live and help 
live " is a better. — Anon. 

— Truth is as impossible to be soiled by any outward touch as 
the sunbeam. — Milton. 

— Macaroni originated in Italy, of course, and the name is said 
to have been given to it by a wealthy man, who had a cook possessed 
of real genius for his art. One day he devised the flour-tubes and 
served them palatably. ' ' Cari ! " ( " the darlings ! " ) cried the 
epicure, and the second mouthful he called ' ' Mascari " ( " oh what 
darlings ! ") With the third he exclaimed with emotion, " Macaro- 
ni ! " (" oh, my dearest darlings ! ") and the name has clung to it 
ever since. — Copied. 



2474 The Euterpean. 



AGNES BELLE GOLDSBY. 



OFFICERS. 

President — Mary B. Gudger. 

Vice President — Frances Powers. 

Secretary — Agnes Belle Goldsby. 

Critic — Lila Little. 

Chaplain — Elizabeth Jeffries Bowden. 

Treasurer — Corinne Baskin. 

Librarian — Emma Greider. 

— The first meeting of our Society this year was held on Fri- 
day evening, the eleventh of September, nineteen hundred and three. 
We were more than glad to welcome the twenty-eight girls who 
were then admitted into our Society and it goes without saying that 
they will thoroughly enjoy being Euterpeans. 

The following Friday we assembled in our hall at the usual hour 
and again several new members were received into our midst. Be- 
cause of the initiation we were obliged to shorten our program. 

— Miss Lita Young, one of last year's Seniors, a loyal Euter- 
pean, former Secretary of our Society, etc., has returned to her 
Alma Mater where she will continue her course in Elocution. 

— We are pleased to have Miss Laura Hairston, another 
old Euterpean, with us once more. 

This session our membership has been unusually large and we 
found that the number of chairs in our hall was not sufficient to 
comfortably accommodate the entire company so the officers have 
sent an order to the factory for more and we trust that they will be 
here before many days have passed. 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Florence Moorman — Editor-in-chief. 
Cammie Lindley — Assistant Editor. 
Ora Hunter — Literary Editor. 
Brietz Thom — Exchange Editor. 
Rusha Sherrod — Business Manager: 



3Et»ttorial JBepartmettt 



— It is with genuine pleasure that we, the Editorial Staff of this 
year, begin our work. 

We begin by promising you that we will do our best to make 
this year, 1903-1904, a credit to our Society and of universal inter- 
est to our readers. We ask that you in return, our readers, will 
judge and criticise this, our first attempt leniently as possible. This 
is a new field which we are entering now, but we hope that ere long, 
through the combined efforts of editors and readers, that the pres- 
ent standard will be replaced by a much higher one. It is utterly 
impossible for us to work separately, girls, so we beg in the begin- 
ning that each one of you, individually will help as much as she 
can. Criticise ' ' constructively but not destructively. ' ' 

We want you, our old girls of years gone by, to take an inter- 
est in our department of The Academy. Help us by sending news 
of yourself and other Alumnae of your day. 



2476 The Hesperian. 



Sonets Netos. 



Mary Culpepper — President. 
Brietz Thom — Vice President. 
Nataline Haynes — Secretary. 
Florence Moorman — Critic. 
Ruth Matthews — Chaplain. 
Cammie Van Lindley — Treasurer. 
Bess Gold — Librarian. 

— So far we have had only two meetings in Society. Our pro- 
grams have been short but interesting, what they lacked in quantity 
they more than gained in quality. 

We expect to accomplish wonders in our literary course this 
year. Our object is to have a highly interesting program for each 
Friday night, and at the same hold largely to literature. And in 
that way have our meetings pleasing and instructive too. Our lit- 
erary course will begin Friday, September 25th, with a ' ' Shakes- 
peare Evening. ' ' A sketch of Shakespeare will be read and each 
member of the Society will answer to her name with a quotation 
from Shakespeare. 

We have had nineteen new members, and there are others 
ready to join next Friday night. These new members were wel- 
comed most heartily by us all, and we hope that they enjoy being 
with us as much as we enjoy having them. We expect to enjoy 
every evening that we spend together. 

We shall try to publish some sketch read in Society in each 
month's edition of The Academy. 

Then too, " humor " will not be entirely forgotten, for we shall 
publish any "bright (?) saying of any bright girl." 



The Acad-emy. 2477 



HISTORY OF WACHOVIA 

IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

By Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N„ C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title 
Printed by Doubleday, Pagedf Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 
sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils- 
will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 
careful!)' written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure 

The Charlotte Observer publishes an extended review of the above 
work, concluding with the following lines : 

"A very instructive chapter comes near the close of the volume, giv- 
ing a history of the Moravian Church, or " Unitas Fratrum," as they styled 
themselves. The last chapter gives a sketch of the lives of the eleven 
Principals of Salem Academy and Col ege, from Samuel Kransch, in 1802*,. 
down to the present incumbant. This chapter is written by Miss Lehman. 

" We are still indebted to Dr. Clewell for giving us the history of this 
unique and interesting people. Whoever has visited o d Salem, and seen 
its unique houses, its shaded groves, its vener *b!e graveyard with recum- 
bent tombstones, its church with its beautiful and impressive ceremony, its 
venerable gi veyard with recumbent tombstones, its church with its beau- 
tiful and impressive ceremony, its far famed schools, its evidences of thrift 
and sobriety, whoever has seen all these things has wished that he might 
learn more of the simple, earnest, Christian people that h >ve builded here 
so well. 

"Dr. Clewell has made judicious use of his sources in writing this his- 
tory, nnd has U Id his story in a st aightforward, scholarly manner. He has 
evidently gone th ough with much pa ient and laborious research in the 
prosecution of his task. The result, a handsomely bound volume in cloth 
and gold, stands very much to his credit, and is a cause for just pride both 
to himself ;ind the people he represents." 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. r 

Winston-Salem, N„ C. 



2478 




The Academy. 

James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Corresponde?ice solicited 






ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream' Puffs, ~) 20 cts. 
Crescents, V per 
Cup Cakes, j dozen. 



Vanilla Wafers, ^ 10 cts. 
Kisses, > per 

Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



a- 



m 



The Academy. 



2479 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment of rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs. Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others that hnve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a st .ck that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others fiat will 
please the most exclusive and exacting taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as weil cared for and invite inspection. 

SOBOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



2480 The Academy. 

102d YE^lR 



$ALCm ACADGIDY 

. ADD tfOLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, IN", C. 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown, 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos .Comenius, and, throngh the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parents who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the Schooi, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ing of a true home within Salem Academy and Collegk, esen very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors, 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared- 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons ill the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year"a copy of which will 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



The Academy. 



2481 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writiftg. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogua. 

J AS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 




HOTEL CTOlsTIES- 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 
At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



2482 The Academy. 

OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, JST. C. 



D« 



WINSTON-SALEM. N C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 



The Academy. 2482 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 

T ID MOST IIP Tfl ME LIS 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

ROSENBACHERS 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



2484 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGKAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 



When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized. Scholarships prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomely illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1S93. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



1793-The Bingham SchooM902-03 

Located on the AshtviUe Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Offi<e' de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented th s year, from Massachusetts and I. a ;t >ta 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
#125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office,' Ashev ]!e, N. C. 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol. 27. Winston-Salem, N. C. , October, 1903. No. 232. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College ; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



IBtittortal. 



— We hope to receive a report from the Special Departments 
next month. All the departments are well filled this year, and we 
anticipate fine work during the session upon which we have entered. 



— As will be seen upon the lower corner of the envelope the 
subscription of many of our friends has expired. We hope that 
during this month we may receive a large number of welcome letters 
with the subscription price enclosed. 

— We have received from the well known Huyler firm a box 
containing specimens of the cocoa bean in the various stages of 
preparation for mercantile use. The samples are placed in neat 
bottles, and will be a fine addition to the Cooking School depart- 
ment. In addition to the bottled samples there are a number of 
large sheets on which are beautiful illustrations of the growth and 
methods of gathering and shipping cocoa. Altogether the gift is 
a very acceptable one, and we return thanks to the firm for the 
donation. 



2486 The Academy. 

— The weather during the early part of the month of October 
has been ideal. Just cool enough to be bracing and at the same 
time dry and bright, with a warm sun during the day. The weather 
called for many excursions into the neighboring forests. 



— The preparations for the celebration of the Sesqui-Centen- 
nial continue. The spot of ground on which was located the origi- 
nal cabin has been purchased by a committee, and will be retained 
as a permanent memorial of the first dwelling-house of the settlers 
in 1753. 



Faithfulness- --Wisdom-- -Sue cess. 



A large school is a miniature world. Within the school are all 
.the ambitions, the successes and, we may add, at times also the 
neglects and failures to be found in the busy, wider world about us. 
Here within the school .can be found the opportunity of studying 
the successes and failures much more readily than in the case of the 
wider world which is usually termed real life. 

Every one strives to attain to success. This is the natural po- 
sition. The fact that all do not attain to success is due as much to 
lack of wisdom or of judgment as to any other cause. When a 
pupil enters upon a course of study she has no other idea but that 
she will ' ' get through. ' ' The frequenting of the infirmary for some 
slight or even imaginary ailment seems to her a natural thing to do, 
and in her own mind it is not considered an element in the question 
of ultimate success, yet it does play an important part in the 
decision. 

Again, the use of occasional evenings for social pleasures, when 
they should be employed in study, does not impress the pupil as 
being a dangerous thing, yet many a vessel has been wrecked by 
the improper use of the time belonging to the so-called study 
period. 

A still more insiduous danger is that which palliates neglect. 
A study is not pleasant to the pupil. She fails to study as she 
should. This is neglect, and is fatal to class-room interests. The 
recitation, perchance, brings to her a general question or possibly 



The Academy. 2487 

no question. This seems to be a success, and the plan is tried 
again. Possibly again all turns out well by some accident. Soon, 
however, the evil appears in the steady decline of the standing of 
the pupil, until success trembles in the balance. 

All these difficulties are due to a lack of wisdom. As a rule 
the road to success is lost sight of because of unwise conclusions, 
because of lack of wisdom on the part of the pupil. 

The positive side of the matter shows a very simple remedy. 
Success is not so dffficult to attain. The elements of success depend 
more upon day by day faithfulness in little matters than by any 
great effort at any one time. Among these conditions to success in 
school-life we note the following as some of the many which might 
be mentioned : 

Regularity in class attendance. Faithful observance of the 
time allotted to study periods. A wise and judicious conception of 
the tasks to be performed and of the ends to be attained. Armed 
with these three strong points success is assured to every one who 
has received ordinary intellectual gifts. 

Each pupil should aim high, and should strive for success. 
Each pupil should test her position to ascertain whether wisdom 
dwells with her in her plans and in her methods of work. Add to 
this wisdom of methods faithfulness in the discharge of duties and 
there is no reason why a happy and worthy end to her course of 
study should not be attained by every pupil within the school. 



— The list of historical events published elsewhere will, no 
doubt, be of "interest to many of our readers, since they will recall 
many interesting experiences, and will be convenient as a place of 
reference in deciding the time when certain events took place. 



— The Winston Fair was held early in October, and was favored 
with the best weather. The attendance was very large, and many 
of our friends came to take in the Fair and to greet the young 
people in the school. We are always glad to welcome our friends 
from a distance, and to have them spend a season in our city. 



2488 The Academy. 

The Caps and Gowns. 



Very promptly were the caps and gowns sent to us this year, 
and happy was the company which received them. The day when 
the Seniors received this special symbol of leadership within the 
school is an epoch in the history of their school experience. When 
the express wagon drove around the corner from Main Street, one 
of the members of the Class was near the office door, and, with a 
wild shriek, the announcement was made that something extraordi- 
nary had happened. Then there was hurrying to and fro, and ex- 
citement reigned supreme. This excitement continued to increase 
until the contagion had spread to other classes, and the whole 
school seemed to realize the situation. 

At last the long boxes had been taken out and distributed, and 
one after another donned the becoming costume. In an hour the 
Seniors of yesterday became the more dignified Seniors of to-day, 
and the Freshmen and Sophomores looked on admiringly. Of 
course, the Juniors stood on their dignity somewhat, and did not 
say very much, but even they felt the importance of the hour, at 
least to some extent. Later, the entire company took the famous 
walk through the town, feeling that they were the observed of all 
observers. That walk ! The Seniors of earlier years will realize 
just how the company felt -as it passed up Main street and around 
Court House Square. May the Class prove itself to be worthy of 
this leadership in this important year of the school's history. 



Improvements. 



The motto of our school is to make everything better from year 
to year. With this object in view the class rooms and dormitories 
are receiving special attention at the present time. Neat iron bed- 
steads have been placed in Vogler Hall and in the large dormitory 
in Main Hall. These white enamelled bedsteads, with the fine bed 
springs, and the new and comfortable mattresses which have been 
placed in Vogler Hall, add greatly to the department. In the 
class rooms in Society Hall new single desks with chairs are being 
placed in the Sophomore and Freshmen classes. These desks are 



The Academy. 2-189 

a great improvement on the ordinary school desks, especially the 
chair part. Both desks and chairs can be raised or lowered to suit 
the needs of each pupil, and the chairs are made according to the 
best health principles, combined with absolute comfort. We feel 
sure these efforts will be appreciated by the excellent Sophomore 
and Freshmen classes, and the school expects specially good work 
in view of these efforts which are being put forth for their material 
comfort and happiness. 



Class Elections. 

The various Classes have organized by the election of officers. 
The following is a list of the names : 

Senior Class. 
President, Mary Culpepper ; Vice President, Nellie Bu- 
ford ; Secretary, Mary Gudger ; Treasurer, Corinne Baskin ; 
Poet. Agnes Belle Goldsby ; Historian, Feances Powers. 

Junior Class. 
President, Annie Sue LeGrand ; First Vice President, Jen- 
nie Cardwell ; Second Vice President, Mittie Perryman ; 
Secretary, Mattie Baynes ; Treasurer, Bessie Gold ; Poet, 
Helen Blanford ; Historian, Pearl Carrington ; Monitors, 
Gertrude Tesh and Mary Sherrod. 

Sophomore Class. 
President, Elizabeth Archibald ; First Vice President, 
Louise Bahnson ; Second Vice President, L. Jones ; Secretary, 
Ruth Siewers ; Treasurer, Lily Domnan ; Librarians, Lois 
Brown and Carrie Levy ; Monitors, Eleanor Fries and Lila 
Little. 

Freshman Class. 
President, Emma Gudger ; First Vice President, Grace 
Siewers ; Second Vice President, Jennie Wilde ; Secretary, Anna 
Brown ; Treasurer, Mary Hassell ; Historian, Opal Brown ; 
Librarian, Mary Frost ; Monitors, Mary Cobb and Zilpha 
Messer. 



24£0 The Academy. 

1884-1885--1886. 



Nearly ten years ago there was published in The Academy a 
historical summary of events as they took place in the onward march 
of time. The object at that time was to make a reference table to 
which any one could go to establish the time when a certain event 
took place. It will be our object during the coming months 
to complete this list, but in order to make it more satisfac- 
tory as an historical reference table we will copy the sketches pub- 
lished a number of years ago, and then finish the items to the pres- 
ent time thus completing the reference list for a period of twenty 
years. The need of such a list is shown by the fact that we are 
often asked questions which require much research to answer. For 
instance, the question will be asked : ' ' When were the pianos 
moved from the basement ?" " When was Annex Hall built ?' ' 
' ' When were the alcoves introduced ?" " When were the present 
names of Senior, Junior, Sophomore and Freshman given to the 
Academic classes ?' ' These and many similar questions have been 
asked, and this little sketch of the historical events will enable the 
reader to refer to many of the incidents of the passing years. The 
exact month may not be correct in every instance, since The Acad- 
emy from which the information is gleaned sometimes gives in 
March an event which took place in February but fails to indicate 
this latter fact. In such instances we have given the month of the 
record of the event, as that is sufficiently near for our purpose : 

Rev. J. T. Zorn, Principal, with his family, moved from Salem, 
N. C. , to Nazareth, Penn. Rev. Edward Rondthaler assumed the 
Principalship of Salem Female Academy, Rev. J. H. Clewell, Assist- 
ant Principal ; the latter, with his family, residing in the Principal' s 
house. August, 1884. 

Lieut. S. C. Lemly lectured on the subject of the Greeley 
relief party, of which he was a member. September, 1884. 

Wachovia Park opened and named at a Sunday School picnic. 
September, 1884. 

Prof. Agthe began his duties as Professor of Music, Prof. 
S. D'Anna having withdrawn earlier. September, 1884. 

Senior Class visited the North Carolina Exposition. The dis- 
play of articles by the Academy was the best school exhibit. Octo- 
ber, 1884. 



The Academy. 2491 

Mamie Purcell died. November, 1884. 

" Autumn Leaf Holiday" instituted. November, 1884. 

Christmas Concert. December 18, 1884. 

Large Christmas decoration in the old ' ' Town Girl' s Room' ' . 
December, 1884. 

Dr. Mayo, of Boston, lectured in the Academy. Jan'y, 1885. 

Pianos moved from basement of Main Hall. January, 1885. 

"Louise Fund" created by a gift of $1,000, by Col. F. H. 
Fries, to the Art Department. February, 1885. 

Rev. Edward Rondthaler visited a number of Northern 
Schools. 

Miss Lewis took charge of Art Department. February, 1885. 

Calisthenic Entertainment. March, 1885. 

Balustrade around the fountain removed. April, 1885. 

Former day school room cut up into smaller practice rooms. 
April, 1885. 

Class rooms separated from living rooms. Later exchanged 
long tables for three smaller tables ; sofas, carpets, etc. , added. 
April, 1885. 

Outdoor sports inaugurated. April, 1885. 

Teachers entertained at Rev. Edward Rondthaler' s residence. 
May, 1885. 

Senior's entertained at Principal's house. June, 1885. 

Commencement, June 7 — 10, 1885. Sermon by Rev. Dr. A. 
W. Miller, of Charlotte. Diplomas presented by Gov. A. M. Scales. 
Senior Class numbered twenty-four. Number of pupils, faculty not 
included, for school year was 187. 

The Academy enlarged to eight pages, commencing with the 
June number, 1885. Edition was three thousand copies. 

Six girls remained in the Academy during the vacation, 1885. 

Vacaiion girls visited the mountains. August, 1885. 

The Academy suggests the organization of an Alumnee Asso- 
ciation. September, 1885. 

Dr. Rondthaler presented the Academy with $300, later invested 
in a fountain. 1885. 

Changes of the summer : Alcoves built ; large range in kit- 
chen ; roof painted. 1885. 

Industrial department organized. September, 1885. 



2492 The Academy. 

Repousse brass works commenced in Studio. October 1885. 

Rear basement floor of Main Hall used for Calisthenic Drill. 
1885. 

Industrial Department moved to the fourth floor of Main Hall. 
November, 1885. 

Office Of Night Watchman created in the Academy. John 
Chadwick the first incumbent. November, 1885. 

Founder's Day holiday. October 27, 1885. 

Calisthenic drill transferred to chapel. December, 1885. 

Geographical Society organized. December, 1885. 

Old fire engine (1784) discovered in the cellar, beneath the 
dining-room. December, 1885. 

Christmas concert. December 17, 1885. 

Cold, 3 to 5 below zero. January, 1886. 

Tableaux, recitations and music in chapel, followed by recep- 
tion in dining room. New Year's Day, 1886. 

Principal's hour instituted. January, 1886. 

Dr. Rondthaler visited educational institutions, north and east. 
March, 1886. 

Park enlarged to the south ; game grounds arranged. April, 
1886. 

Calisthenic entertainment. April, 1886. 

" Golden Fours" given out for the first time. June, 1886. 

Senior reception. June, 1886. 

Commencement, June 13 — 17, 1886. Dr. Rondthaler preached 
the sermon. Senator Z. B. Vance made the address ; Rev. Robert 
de Schweinitz presented the diplomas. Twenty-six graduates in 
the college department. Alumnae Association organized. 

Three vacation girls. 1886. 

Earthquake. August 31, 1886. 

Former downstairs teachers' room changed to senior class 
room. September, 1886. 

Dressing-room opened in basement of Main Hall. September, 
1886. 

Classes now named Senior, Middle, Junior and Preparatory. 
September, 1886. 

Prof. Markgraff entered upon his duties in Language and 
Music. September, 1886. 



The Academv. 2493 

New foundation placed near main gate in Park. September, 
1886. 

The "Extension," a new dormitory in South Hall, opened. 
September, 1886. 

Senior Class occupies two study parlors, named ' ' North ' ' and 
"South" Senior. September, 1886. 

Five new practice rooms made between South Hall and Dining 
Room. September, 1886. 

Part of lower hall in main building changed so as to be used as 
a teachers' room. September, 1886. 

Picnic at Reid's farm, birthday of Assistant Principal. Septem- 
ber, 1886. 

Electric bells placed in Class Rooms. September, 1886. 

Autumnal Picnic, November 4, 1886. 

Government Weather Signal Service Department opened at the 
Academy. December, 1886. 

Fire in Principal's House, December 17th, 1886. Only slight 
damage. 

Christmas Concert, December 22d, 1886. 

' ' The Sleeping Car, ' ' an Entertainment given on New Year' s 
Day, 1887. 

Prof. Agthe resigned. January, 1887. 

Four degrees below zero to forty-five . degrees above, within 
twenty -four hours, January 6, 1887. 

Faculty entertained at Dr. Rondthaler's home. March, 1887. 

Calisthenic Entertainment, May 9 and 10, 1887. 

Class Rings introduced by Class of '87, instead of the Badges 
heretofore used by other Classes'. 

Commencement, Monday, June 13, to Wednesday 15. Sermon 
by Rev. John E. Edwards, D. D., Danville, Va. Commencement 
Orator, Hon. R. R. Ayers, of Va. Number of Graduates in the 
College Course, 27. Alumnae Society adopts constitution and 

by-laws. 

New safe placed in Principal's Office. June, 1887. 

Three vacation girls remain in the Academy. 



— The fountain which occupied the knoll near the entrance to 
the Park has been removed. This delightful spot has been greatly 
improved by this change. 

— A series of special services preparatory to the celebration of 
the Holy Communion were held in the Home Church during the 
early part of October. They were largely attended and much inter- 
est was manifested. 



2494 



The Academy. 



List of Pupils and Teachers. 



The following is a partial list of the registrations for the first 
month of school. A number of names in the Special Departments 
will appear next month : 



Alspaugh, Stella 
Alspaugh, Frankie 
Aird, Emma 
Adams, Mary 
Anderson, Sallie 
Archibald, Elizabeth 
Bailey, Blanche 
Bailey, Mary 
Bahnson, Louise 
Bahnson, Pauline 
Barber, Emorie 
Barnard, Julia 
Barnard, Florence 
Baskin, Corinnel 
Baugham, Pattie 
Baynes, Mattie 
Bennett, Nellie 
Bennett, Annie 
Bewley, Luta 
Bitting, Bessie 
Blandford, Helen 
Blum, Mary 
Blum, Minnie 
Bowden, Bessie 
Boyd, Sallie 
Brewer, Carrie 
Brietz, Ethel 
Blount, Muse 
Brooke, Fanny 
Brower, May 
Brown, Louise 
Brown, Jenkie 
Brown, Anna 
Brown, Lois 
Brown, Eloise 
Brown, Opal 
Bryant, Norfleet 
Bryant, Ethel 
Buck, Helen 
Buford, Nellie 
Bulluck, Maud 
Bury, Lucile 
Bury, Dorris 
Bynum, Julia 
Cardwell, Jennie 
Carmichael, Maud 
Carrington, Pearl 
Carter, Mary 
Casey, Catherine 
Chaney, Ethel 



Cheatham, Birdie 
Citrenbaum, Nettie 
Clinard, Lollie 
Clodfelter, Allle 
Clodfelter, Floge 
Cobb, Mary 
Cook, Ada 
Cook, Sadie 
Corbin, Ethel 
Crews, Lillian 
Crist, Ruth 
Crist, Louise 
Culpepper, Mary 
Curtis, Lena 
Cuthrell, Mrs. C. F. 
Cromer, Mary 
Chisman, Pescud 
Chisman, Pattie 
Coe, Ida 
Daniels, Louise 
Dean, Cora 
Deane, Myrtle 
Dickinson, Nannie 
Domnau, Lillie 
Dunkley, Lucy 
Dunlap, May 
Dunlap, Minnie 
Dalton, May 
Dalton, Rums 
Easterling, Kittie 
Ebert, Emma 
Ellis, Lillian 
Erwin, Ellie 
Fain, Louise 
Farish, Mary 
Farish, Lily 
Farmer, Annie 
Farrow, Stella 
Farthing, Georgia 
Ferebee, Louise 
Ferrell, Lora 
Fetter. Lizzie 
Flinn, Lelia 
Follin, Ruby 
Foust, Emma 
Fries, Eleanor 
Fries, Marguerite 
Frost, Mary 
Fulp, Mamie 
Fulton, Bessie 



Follin, May 
Groves, Nannie 
Gaither, Mary 
Garner, Haydy 
Glenn, Loula 
Glenn, Rebecca 
Gold, Bessie 
Goldsby, Agnes Belle 
Gudger, Mary 
Gudger, Emma 
Greider, Emma 
Greider, Hattie 
Greider, Ruth 
Griffith, Kathleen 
Gray, Alice 
Groves, Ruby 
Grunert, Louie 
Graves, Sarah 
Hairston, Laura 
Hall, Bertha 
Hall, Irene 
Hampton, Esther 
Hanes, Frank 
Hanes. Ruth 
Hanes, Claudia 
Harris, Eva 
Harris, Leonorah 
Hassell, Mary 
Haynes, Nataline 
Haynes, Katie 
Hege, Pearl 
Hege, Ethel 
Hege, Connie 
Helsel, Tillie 
Hine, Louise 



Jones, Mattie 
Kerner, May 
Kerner, Annie 
Kilbuck, Ruth 
Kimel, Ethel 
Kime, Joy 
King, Blanche 
King, Alma 
Koerner, Kathleen 
Knouse, Bessie 
Knox, Eliza 
Ladd, Rebecca 
La Beet, Lucile 
Le Grand, Annie S. 
Lentz, Margaret 
Leslie, Grace 
Levy, Carrie 
Liles, Mary 
Liipfert, Theo. 
Lindley, Cammie 
Lineback, Lucy 
Little, Lila 
Little, Fannie 
Little, Alice 
Little, Rosa 
Little, Sadie 
Lockett, Sadie 
Lott, Dorcas 
Lott, Mildred 
Louhoff, Elsie 
Lyon, Clyde 
Lewis, Janie 
Lichtenthaeler, Annie 
Mangum, Fannie 
Matthe ws, Ruth 



Hollingsworth, Lettie May, Millie 



Hollinger, Aline 
Hopkins, Margaret 
Horton, Louise 
Howard, Maidie 
Hunter, Ora 
Johnson, Delia 
Johnson, Lillian 
Johnson, Erline 
Jones, Treva 



McCorkle, Ruby 
McDonald, Glenn 
McEachern, Lula 
McEachern, Mamie 
McMurray, Mary 
McMillan' Gussie 
Meinung, Ruth 
Mendenhall, Vivian 
Mendenhall, Myrtle 



Jones, Mary Newman Merrimon, Nancy 
Jones, Mary Messer, Zllpha 

Jones, Cynthia Hickey, Annie 

Jones, Laurie R. Mickle, Margaret 

Jones, Ina Miller, Zeta 



The Academy. 



2495 



Miller, Ida 
Miller, Sudie 
Miller, Nelleen 
Miller, Trula 
Miller, Agnes 
Miller, Emma 
Mock, Sarah 
Moore, Rachel 
Moorman, Florence 
Moorman, Corinna 
Montgomery, Louise 
Morgan, Lula 
Morrison, May 
Myers, Dorothy 
McLain, Aline 
Nicholson, Annie P. 
Nicholson, Blanche 
Nicewonger. Ivy 
Nichols, Ada 
Norryce, Edna 
Ormsby, Anna 
Owens, Evelyn 
Owens, Alice 
Owens, Vivian 
Ogburn, Anna 
Page, Katharine 
Palmer, Mary 
Parish, Ava 
Partin, Pearl 
Patterson, Ethel 
Payne, Sallie 
Peebles, Julia 
Perryman, Mittie 
Peterson, Giace 
Peterson, Pauline 
Petree, Mamie 
Petty, Martha 
Petty, Rachel 
Pfaff, Mamie 
Pillans, Laura 
Powers, Frances 
Purdy, Edith 
Pratt, Lisora 
Price, Carrie 
Pfaff, Erma 
Pierce, Mary 
Privatt, Dorothy 
Parker, Lillie 



Rauhut, Minnie 
Reed, Laura 
Richard, Ida 
Richard, Hattie 
Reynolds, Maud 
Reynolds, Marie 
Rhea, Nell 
Robertson, Nannie 
Robinson, Luclle 
Rose, Alice 
Reich, Luna 

Reaves, ■ 

Smith, Edna 
Seddon, Joey 
Sheppard, Missie 
Sherrod, Rusha 
Sherrod, Mary 
Sheetz, Sue 
Shutt, Ruth 
Siewers, Ruth 
Siewers, Grace 
Simpson, Kathleen 
Sink, Mamie 
Sizer, Anna 
Slayden, Mary Agnes 
Smith, Helen 
Smith, Kathleen 
Speas, Bessie 
Spencer, Mary 
Spencer, Mildred 
Spencer, Lillian 
Spillars, Mamie 
Spillars, Lula 
Stafford, Cleve 
Stein, Hebe 
Stewart, Effle 
Stewart, Lois 
Stewart, Mary 
Stipe, Loula 
Stockton, Florence 
Stone, Mary W. 
Snyder, Mr. H. 
Sheek, Nora 
Shipley, Stella 
Swink, Edna 
Tatum, Clara 
Tay, Kathleen 
Tay, Marguerite 



Taylor, Kate 
Taylor, Grace 
Tesh, Gertrude 
Thomas, Mabel 
Thomas, Claude 
Thomas, Marybell 
Thomas, Rea 
Thomas, De Los 
Thomas, Mary Lou 
Thorn, Brietz 
Thorp, Lucy 
Tomlinson, Margaret 
Traxler, Blossom 
Vaughn, Tuchie 
Vaughn, Cassandra 
Vaughn, Margaret 
Vaughn, Lora 
Vick, Vera 
Vance, Lucy 
Warren, Bessie 
Ware, Clara 
Ware, Nellie 
Watson, Mami e 
Watson, Mary 
Watlington, Mary 
Watson, Atha 
Webster, Katheiine 
Welfare, Drudie 
Welfare, Hattie 
Wharton, Eva 
White, Esther 
White, Ethel 
Whittingten, Lizzie 
Wilde, Jennie 
Wilde, Helen 
Willingham, Ruth 
Wilson. Etta 
Wilson, Margie 
Wilson, Julia 
Wilson, Annie S. 
Wil.son, Edna 
Wilson, Elsie 
Wohlford, Bertha 
Woosley, Pearl 
Wurreschke, Naomi 
Young, Lita 
Young, Nell 



hi Domestic Science. 
Miss Etta Shaffner, 
Miss Adelaide Fries, 
Miss Ellen Ebert, 
Mrs. F. H. Fries, 
Mrs. H. E. Fries, 
Mrs. Henry Starbuck, 
Mrs. J. D. Laugenour, 
Mrs. James Sloan, 
Mrs. Henry Vogler, 
Mrs — Coan. 

Members of Faculty. 
Mis; Ackerman, 
Miss Bessent, 
Miss Barrow, 
Miss Bonney, 
MissChitty, 
Miss Carter, 
Dr. Clewell. 
Miss Greider, 
Miss Heisler, 
Miss Henderson, 
Miss Jeter, 
Miss Johnston, 
Miss Jones, 
Miss Kapp, 
Miss Lehman, 
Miss Lewis, 
Miss Meinung, 
Miss Morrison, 
Mr. Pfohl. 
Miss Roueche, 
Dr. Rondthaler, 
Miss Rice, 
Miss Smith, 
Miss Speas, 
Miss L. Shaffner, 
Miss S. Shaffner, 
Prof. Shirley, 
Miss Siedenberg, 
Miss Thomas 
Miss C. Vest, 
Miss S. Vest 
Miss Van Vleck, 
Miss Wolle, 
Miss Wharton, 
Miss Winkler. 



— The brick for the Alumnae Centennial Memorial Hall are 
now being placed upon the vacant lot made by the excavation, and 
before another number of The Academy will have been printed 
the work of erection will be under way. 



2496 The Academy. 

$tt Etgijter Vein. 



' ' Why is a woman like an umbrella ?' ' asked the exchange 
editor. 

" Because she's made of ribs and attached to a stick," replied 
the information editor. ' ' Why is — ' ' 

' ' Wrong. Guess again. ' ' 

"Because she always has to be shut up when — " 

' ' Naw ! You fatigue me. 

" Because she stands in the hall, and — " 

" Naw ! it's nothing about standing in the hall." 

' ' A woman is like an umbrella because nobody ever gets the 
right one. Why is — ' ' 

. " Ring off ! That isn't the answer, either." 

" It's a better one than you've got." 

"Don't you reckon I know whether it is or not? Whose 
conundrum is this, yours or mine?" 

"Well, she's like an umbrella because — It isn't because she 
fades with age, is it ?' ' 

' ' You ought to be ashamed of yourself. 

" I am. Is it because you have to put up when it's cloudy and 
threatening — no, that can't be it. Because she's a good thfng to 
have in the house. Why is — ' ' 

" You're not within four counties of it." 

" Because you can't find an) r pocket in either. Why is — " 

' ' No choice. Vote again. ' ' 

" I won't. A woman isn't like an umbrella. There is not the 
slightest resemblance. Go on with your work and let me alone. 

" I knew you couldn't guess it. It's because she's accustomed 
to reign. ' ' 



— The Cooking School has opened a " Tea Room," which will 
be ready to receive visitors from school and town from time to time. 
Refreshments will be sold, and the guests will be given a pleasant 
time. All proceeds will be used to pay for the work now in prog- 
ress on Memorial Hall. 



— A large, new piano has just been received by the Music De- 
partment. This piano is one of the best which have recently been 
placed in the practice rooms, and the large and enthusiastic music 
school will know how to place this excellent instrument to the very 
best use. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF : 
Agnes Belle Goldsby, '04— Editor-in-Chief. 

Mary B. Gudger, '04, 1 ft •„«. * t^,-<-~ 
Frances Powers. '<£ f Assist ^t Editors. 

Helen M. Blandeord, '05— Literary Editor. 
Carrie Levy, '06- Exchange Editor. 
Corinne Baskin, '04— Business Manager. 



The Editor's Song. 



How dear to my heart is the steady subscriber, 
Who pays in advance at the birth of each year : 
Who lays down a half-dollar, and offers it gladly, 
And casts 'round the office a halo of cheer. 

Who never says, " Stop it, I cannot afford it !" 
Or, "I'm getting more papers than I can read," 
But always says, ' ' Send it, the family all like it, 
In fact, we regard it a household need !" 

How welcome is he when he steps in the sanctum, 

How he makes our hearts throb ! How he makes our eyes 

dance ! 
We outwardly thank him, we inwardly bless him, 
The steady subscriber who pays in advance. 

— Selected. 



— Let our lives be pure as snow-fields, where our footsteps 
leave a mark but no stain. — Mme. Swetchine. 



— College bred is sometimes a four-years' loaf. — Ripton Col- 
lege News. 



2498 The Euterpean. 

Archery. 



B. G. 



Since time immemorial the bow has been the weapon of all 
peoples, both civillized and uncivilized. 

' ' The Greeks and Romans employed archers to draw the ene- 
my into action, and the exploits of the Egyptians rivalled those of 
the archers of the Middle Ages. ' ' 

About the eighth century, during the reign of Charlemagne, 
the French began to use the bow. 

The defeat of the Britons at the battle of Hastings was cer- 
tainly due to the skill and dexterity of William the Conqueror and 
his archers. • 

It was under Norman rule that England's archers gained great 
renown, and were recognized by the world as being superior to 
those of any other nation. 

In the Holy Land Richard the Lion Hearted, with an army of 
seventeen knights and three hundred bowmen, performed many 
glorious deeds. Upon one occasion the heroic Christians withstood 
the charge of the entire Turkish and Saracen forces. While this 
monarch was on the throne, Robin Hood and his merry men led 
their happy-go-lucky lives, free from care and unmolested beneath 
the sheltering boughs and protecting shades of Sherwood Forest. 

The Royal Company of Archers, the king's body-guard for 
Scotland, as it is to-day, was constituted in 1676. 

The lithe Indian lad sent his cruel shaft straight to the heart 
of the panting deer, and the valiant warrior employed the arrow to 
protect his wigwam from the hands of the merciless white man. 

Archery is among England's chief sports, and it is fast becom- 
ing one of America's favorite pastimes. 

The St. Louis society girls are being instructed in this art by 
War Eagle, a full-blooded Indian, who claims to be the champion 
archer of the world. It is believed that these young ladies wish to 
have an amateur archery contest at the World's Fair. If this plan 
is carried out, doubtless numerous sportsmen and women from var- 
ious portions of the Laiited States will be glad to test their skill and 
ability in this delightful, graceful and beneficial exercise. 



The Euterpean. 2499 

From days of long ago down to the present age the little god 
of Love has been represented with a bow and arrow clasped tightly 
between his chubby fingers. There is no telling what havoc this 
wee rascal may have wrought or what joy he may have brought to 
the hearts of blushing maid and blissful youth, and even to men 
and women in the prime of life ; what sweet and tender memories 
he may have left with those upon whose heads Winter has sprinkled 
her purest snowflakes — for who is proof against Cupid' s mischievous 
darts ? 

Beautiful Diana has come to earth again. We discovered her 
last Spring when she, with her fair attendants, consented to mingle 
with the stately dames and lordly squires who gathered at the Kir- 
mess to dance the minuet. Not only her gilded arrow but the darts 
flashed from her radiant eyes pierced and conquered the hearts of 
all who beheld her. Diana of Ephesus could have done no more. 



3£arijanp Department. 



C L , '06 



— Exchanges do not seem to be coming our way at present, 
but we hope that by next month our exchange table will be filled. 

— He : " Will you have a little lobster?" 

She : ' ' Oh this is so sudden. 

— An Irish baronet one day observed to a friend that he had 
an excellent telescope : 

" Do you see that church," he said, " about half a mile off? — 
it is scarcely discernable — but when I look at it through my teles- 
cope it brings it so near that I can hear the organ playing. ' ' 

— A bicycle rider with one eye was arrested for having his 
lamp out. 

— " They say corporations have no souls." 

' ' How about the Shoe Trust?' ' 

— Curate : ' ' Now, children, let us have ' ' Little Drops of 
Water" with a little more spirit in it." — Oak. 

— What is the longest word in the dictionary ? Rubber : you 
can stretch it. 



2500 The Euterpean. 

j5octctg Kotes anti Hocals. 



— Seventy-four girls now answer to the roll call of the Euter- 
pean Society, and it is the most earnest wish of the officers and all 
the other members to make this year one of the happiest, brightest 
and most prosperous the Society has ever known. With this feel- 
ing abroad among us we feel confident of success. 

— On Friday evening, Sept. 2oth, a very interesting Shakes- 
perian game was played and heartily enjoyed by those present. 
Miss Ellie Erwin won the prize. 

— We have noticed that the word Euterpean is so often mis- 
spelled. Our Society was named in honor of Euterpe, one of the 
Muses. She presided over music, and is generally represented as 
holding two flutes. The invention of the tragic chorus was ascribed 
to her by the poets. 

— Mrs. Farthing and Mr. Farthing came from Durham to 
spend a few days with Georgia during the Fair. 

— Mrs. Carrington is here on a short visit to Pearl. 

— All the girls are delighted to have Muse Blount with them 
again. 

— This year Dr. Clewell's birthday came on Saturday the 
nineteenth of September, so he decided to give the school the usual 
holiday on the twenty-second, which came on Tuesday. And a 
very happy day it proved to be. Most of the girls were lazy, and 
did notget up until late. At the appointed time, after luncheon, the 
cars lined up in front of the Academv. and both girls and teachers 
went out for a most enjoyable ride over all the car lines. Dinner 
was delightfully served at half-past five, with Bishop and Mrs. 
Rondthaler as guests. At eight o'clock Mr. Sigg, who has long 
been an acknowledged friend of the Academy girls, entertained us 
by a particularly amusing display of stereopticon views. 

Thus, the first holiday of this school term drew happily to a 
close. 



The Euterpean. 2501 

Football. 



H M B 



How excited we all are when we see a good football game, and 
even when we see one that, in the strictest sense, would' nt be called 
a. good game. We are always so anxious for " our side " to win, 
and if we can encourage them by our shouts we are sure to do so. 
Many a time have I heard the words and said them, too, "I'd 
sooner see a good game of football than eat. ' ' The Princeton-Yale 
games are always interesting and a number of special trains are run 
to Princeton on the day of days when these two universities vie with 
each other. All college games are of interest to some of us, but I 
mention Princeton especially as I have a tender spot in my heart 
for it. 

What about the origin of this game ? It, like every thing else, 
must have originated some how or some where, and let us see 
where. It comes from the Greeks, as a number of good things do, 
and age has not kept it from being popular. About two thousand 
years ago a game called harpastum was played in Greece, and to 
this pastime we owe our game of ' ' football. ' ' 

We will find, by looking up the word harpastum that it is 
derived from a word meaning ' ' to carry, ' ' showing us that then as 
now the ball was carried around. It was very like our game of the 
present day, being played by two opposed companies, but an in- 
flated bladder or skin, called ' ' follis ' ' was used in place of a ball. 

When Britain fell into the hands of the Romans in the third 
century B. C. , and the victorious nation settled there, many of their 
customs were introduced, and, undoubtedly, harpastum was among 
them. At first it was played principally by the Britains of the North, 
but very soon spread all over the country. 

Shrove Tuesday, the day before Lent, must have been much 
like our Thanksgiving. In the morning all confessed their sins to 
the priest, and then went home and made merry with a feast, after 
which the young men played harpashtm in the fields. While the 
game was in progress the house shutters had to be barred and the 
houses closed entirely to protect them from the damages which 
would otherwise hc.ve bee .1 clone by the men, women and children 



2502 The Euterpean. 

who took part in the sport. James I. describes it as " meeter for 
laming than making able the users thereof. ' ' As the game was not 
greatly indulged in by the higher classes, about 1830 we find it was 
in vogue only among the schools. We all know from ' ' Tom 
Brown's School Days " it was a popular game at Rugby. 

In I860 there was a great athletic revival, and it was then that 
football was organized as a national game in England. Its fame 
soon reached the United States, and it is now the most popular 
game of the age. 

Our greatest football game is the Army and Navy contest, 
which is played about Thanksgiving time each year on the grounds 
of the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. Seats for this 
game have always been engaged weeks before hand, and those who 
obtain them are considered very fortunate. The officials from Wash- 
ington and other places are always present and add dignity to this 
grand occasion. The streets around the grounds are black with 
men, women and children, all eager to get even one glance at the 
players. 

The games have only been in progress a few years, and the 
report that was out last year that they would be discontinued 
brought sorrow to many hearts. The events are always looked 
forward to with much pleasure as it is such a splendid way to bring 
the Army and Navy boys together to try their strength. Last year 
as well as the years previous the Navy was successful, but we think 
if the Army will stick to it, as Sir Thomas Lipton sticks to yacht 
racing, they'll win by and by. A game like this means a great deal 
of work and faithful work, too, as the honor is very great for the 
victors, and each boy feels a personal responsibility in the game. 
Do not be discouraged, girls, because you cannot take part in an 
Army or Navy or any other large football game. Basket ball is 
growing in favor every day, and if you devote a portion of your time 
to it you will obtain health and pleasure from this sport. 



AN IRISH EPITAPH. 



Here lies the body of Jonathan Ground, 
Who was lost at sea and never was found. 



THE HESPERIAN 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Florence Moorman — Editor-in-chief. 
Cammie Lindley— Assistant Editor. 
Ora Hunter — Literary Editor. 
Brietz Thom — Exchange Editor 
Rusha Sherrod — Business Manager. 



IBtritortal department. 



Be Careful What You Say. 



In speaking of a person's faults, 
Pray, don't forget your own ; 
Remember those with homes of glass 
Should never throw a stone. 
If we have nothing else to do 
But talk of those who sin, 
'Tis better we commence at home, 
And from that point begin. 

We have no right to judge a man, 

Until he's fairly tried ; 

Should we not like his company 

We know the world is wide. 

Some may have faults, — and who has not? 

The old as well as young ; 

Perhaps we may, for aught we know, 

Have fifty to their one. 

Then let us all, when we commence 
To slander friend or foe, 
Think of the harm that we may do 
To those we little know. 
Remember, curses sometimes like 
Our chickens "roost at home." 
Don't speak of other's faults 
Until you have none of your own. 



2504 The Hesperian. 

William Shakespeare. 



In this day of excessive literary production when two years is a 
ripe old age for a book, it is refreshing to turn back to Shakespeare, 
to whose name instead of dimming the years have only added lustre. 

The meagre facts of his life are too well known to need more 
than a brief mention. Stratford-on-Avon has the honor of being his 
birthplace, and April 23, 1564, is the supposed date of his birth. 
This is three days before his baptism, the date of which we surely 
have, and as it was the custom then to baptize children when they 
were three days old, we may safely rest upon this date as a correct 
one. 

He had little schooling, his father's financial difficulties making 
it necessary for him to quit school when about thirteen, and though 
he had "small Latin and less Greek," his well of pure, undefiled 
English is inexhaustible. 

At the age of nineteen he married Anne Hathaway, a woman 
seven years his senior. It proved to be an unhappy union, but it 
was probably the best thing that could have happened for the 
development of his genius, since this uncongeniality in his home 
drove him to London. There he plunged into the stage life at 
once, and was an actor for a time before he found he could write 
plays infinitely better than he could act them. He was not inventive, 
the first idea of a play was rarely his own, but the plot was worked 
over so differently and made to glow so brightly with his rich imag- 
ination that the finished play is entirely his own. How he could 
take such unpromising material, the story of a dreamy, moody boy, 
' one part wise and three parts coward,' and from it evolve his deep- 
est tragedy, ' Hamlet, ' can scarcely be imagined. Could any one 
but this master genius have produced * Romeo and Juliet ' from a 
worn and tattered story of two lovers ? His best coined}-, ' The 
Merchant of Venice,' is the result of his combining two old stories 
with which all England was familiar, and in the bright alembic of 
his genius they formed the comedy of all the ages. 

His work has been attributed to any one but himself, but it has 
not nor ever will be proved any one's but Shakespeare's. 

His knowledge of professions and classes is wonderful. He 
could portray a queen or a scold, a soldier or a lawyer, with equal 



The Hesperian. 2505 

ease. It has been claimed that he was a soldier at one period of his 
life, and also that he studied law, but as these assertions are un- 
proven it is useless to believe them, for he exhibits sufficient knowl- 
edge of pursuits that we know he did not follow, to allow us to 
think he had made no special study of the two mentioned. 

He knew intuitively how every faculty and feeling would de- 
velop in any conceivable change of fortune. His genius enabled 
him to give being in his pages to all the shapes of humanity that 
present themselves on the stage of life. Each of his characters 
gives voice to a thought or passion with an individuality and a nat- 
uralness that rouse in the intelligent reader the illusion that he is 
hearing men and women speak unpremeditatedly among themselves 
rather than that he is reading a written speech. He delineates the 
supernatural with the same potency, — the ghost in 'Hamlet,' the 
witches in 'Macbeth,' and the fairies in " A Midsummer Night's 
Dream," all make the reader feel that they could not have spoken 
or acted otherwise than as Shakespeare represents them. 

He worked for twenty-eight years and produced in that time 
thirty-seven plays. The plays of "the sweet bard of Avon," as 
Jonson called him, were written nearly as rapidly as our modern 
novels ! Some defects must, of course, be acknowledged, but they 
are so small when measured by the magnitude of his achievement 
that they sink into insignificance. ' ' There is sometimes an atmos- 
phere of obscurity, but the intensity of the interest with which he 
contrives to invest the personality of his characters triumphs over 
halting or digressive treatment of the story in which thev have their 
being. ' ' 

It is generally inferred from his ' Sonnets ' that Shakespeare 
scorned the conditions of an actor's life, and pitied himself for hav- 
ing nothing better to gain his livelihood by than ' public means that 
public manners breed. ' If such passages are to be interpreted liter- 
ally they reflected only a passing mood. He was keenly alive to 
all that touched his profession and an able critic of actor's elocution. 
In ' Hamlet ' he shrewdly denounced their common failings and 
hopefully showed them how they might improve. 

Shakespeare was very successful in the last years of his life, 
and his later plays which are filled with a gentle melancholy show- 
that he had risen above the trivial things of life. 



2506 The Hesperian. 

His dramas brought him a considerable revenue, and he accu- 
mulated a comfortable fortune in middle age, part of which he in- 
vested in a home, " New Place," at Stratford. Here, in the quiet 
beauty of his beloved birth-place, he hoped to spend many happy 
years, but Fate had decreed otherwise. He had been at home five 
or six years, visiting London occasionally and receiving visits from 
his friends, when, during a visit of Jonson and Drayton to him, a 
drinking bout occurred, which, it is said, gave him a fever, result- 
ing in his death. He was buried in the little church in peaceful 
Stratford, and above his tomb is the epitaph, written by himself, 
which has kept his dust undisturbed for nearly three hundred years. 

" Good friend, for Jesus' sake forbeare, 
To digg the dust enclosed heare, 
Blest be ye man yt spares these stones, 
And curst be he yt moves my bones. ' ' 

Nell C. Rhea. 



— " Every one can master a grief but he that has it." 

— "Silence is the perfected herald of joy: I were but little 
happy if I could say how much." 

— " How bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through an- 
other man's eyes." 

— "Her voice was ever soft, 

Gentle and low — an excellent thing in woman." 

— " Virtue is bold and goodness never fearful." 



— We are glad to see the girls taking so much interest in out- 
of-door games, such as basket-ball and tennis, but we are hardly 
surprised since the tennis court and basket-ball grounds have been 
so much improved during our vacation. 

— Before the end of the month we hope to have established in 
the school what will be known as the " Tea Room,!' under the full 
direction of the Cooking School. It will be open to the school and 
to our friends in town. A small entrance fee will be charged, the 
proceeds of which will go to Memorial Hall. 



The Hesperian. 250'i 

iitteran? jfrotes. 



ORA HUNTER. 



' ' Silver Linings, ' ' the story of a blind girl is especially inter- 
esting because Nina Rhodes, the author, is herself blind. 

— "The Voice in the Desert," by Pauline Brandford Machie, 
is an interesting story of the Great Southwest. It is most original 
in its characters and thrilling in its weirdness. 

— "The Mettle of the Pasture," by James Lane Allen, is one 
of those annoying books whose plot depends on a complication that 
ought never to have arisen. Most people find it rather hard to 
sympathize with the suffering which ' ' Isabel ' ' brought upon herself. 

— In "The One Woman," Mr. Dixon has fallen so far below 
the standard of "The Leopard's Spots" that it seems hardly pos- 
sible for the two to have been written by the same person. This 
story is almost if not entirely sensational, and it seems quite safe to 
say that it will not be very long-lived. . 



Some New Books. 



The Master Rogue. Phillips. 

The Long Night. Weyman. 

The Chameleon. Linn. 

Stories of Married Life. Cutting. 

Man Overboord. Cranford. 

The Triumph. Pier. 

Gordan Keith. Page. 

The Shadow of Victory. Reed. 

The Call of the Wild. London. 

The Beaten Path. Makin. 



— Our old girls, of course, remember Ethel Bryant, the 
young lady from Washington, N. C. , who was so homesick last 
year. It seems impossible that she should return. But here she is, 
with her sister, Norfleet Bryant, and six new girls. 



2508 The Hesperian. 

Hocate. 



CAMMIE LINDLEY. 



— Rachel Moye Borden, a former Hesperian, is now at the 
Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, Va. Our wishes 
for a most successful year go with her, though we are sorry indeed 
to lose her. 

— We are glad to welcome Miss Isabelle Rice back, now as 
a teacher. 

— Pescud and Pattie Chisman have returned. We hope 
that the latter' s health is so much improved that she will not have 
to repeat last year's programme and leave us before the end of the 
school-term. 

— The Seniors are rejoicing that their robes and caps have 
come. 

— We are more than glad that Muse Blount's health is so 
improved that she is able to be with us again. 

l&xcjjange department. 

Brietz Thom. 

— We hope to make this department of the paper for the year 
1903-04 just as strong and interesting as possible. We shall ex- 
change with all of our old magazines again this year with much 
pleasure, and hope to see so many old and new exchanges coming 
in that our exchange table will be full to overflowing. 

— "The Crimson," from Manual High School, Louisville, Ky. , 
is our first welcome visitor. We hope that this will not be the last of 
many more such ' ' Crimsons ' ' that will find their way to our table. 

— We shall certainly get The Academy out by the fifteenth of 
each month. In that way it will be safe to say that our exchanges 
will all be sent from here much earlier than was the case last year. 



— All of us are wise in our own estimation, but most of us were 
somewhat surprised when one of the wisest among us spoke of 
' ' ascending downward. 



The Academy. 2509 4 



HISTORY OF WACHOVIA 

IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

By Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N.. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title 
Printed by Doubleday, Page df Co., New York. Price , delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into clost 
sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 
will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this- 
carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure 

The Charlotte Observer publishes an extended review of the above- 
work, concluding with the following lines : 

" A very instructive chapter comes near the close of the volume, giv- 
ing a history of the Moravian Church, or " Unitas Fratrum," as they styled' 
themselves. The last chapter gives a sketch of the lives of the eleven 
Principals of Salem Academy and Col ege, from Samuel Kransch, in 1802,, 
down to the present incumbant. This chapter is written by Miss Lehman, 

" We are still indebted to Dr. Clewell for giving us the history of 1 his- 
unique and interesting people. Whoever has visited o d Salem, and seen 
its unique houses, its shaded groves, its vener >ble graveyard with recum- 
bent tombstones, its church with its beautiful and impressive ceremony, its 
venerable gi veyard with recumbent tombstones, its church with its beau- 
tiful and impressive ceremony, its far famed schools-, its evidences of thrift 
and sobriety, whoever has seen all these things has wished that he might 
learn more of ihe simple, earnest, Christian people that h ve builded here- 
so well. 

"Dr. Clewell has made judicious use of his siurces in writing this his- 
tory, and has ti Id his story in a st aightforward, scholarly manner. He has- 
evidently gone th ough with much pa ient and laborious research in the 
prosecution of his task. The result, a handsomely bound volume in cloth 
and gold, stands very much to his credit, and is a cause for just pride both 
to himself nnd the people he represents " 

Address, Rev J. H CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

V\ inston-Salem^ N_ C. 



2510 




The Academy. 

m James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C,, 

REAL ESTATE 

AZS'D 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Correspondence solicited. 






ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream' Puffs, ^ 20 cts. 
Crescents, >- per 
Cup Cakes, j dozen. 



Vanilla Wafers, ~) 10 cts 
Kisses, [ 



Macaroons, 



per 
dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



iwe 



m MM 



The Academy. 



2511 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment oi rich .radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of otlrs. Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others tnat have a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a st .ck that includes a full line of h gh class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others t at will 
please the most exclusive and exac ing taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOKOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



2512 The Academy,. 

lO'Qd YEA.R 



$ALGm A(£ADGmY 

ADD (JOLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, 1ST, O. 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown, 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos k Comenius, and, throngh the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parents who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School; the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of & 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ing of a true home within Salem Academy and Collegk, even very young girls. 

The patticularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have gro-n and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors, 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers- and shorthand writers arc prepared- 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work "f the School at the pres-nt time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue of last year "a copy of which will 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is de cribed in detail- 
Address 

Rev J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem. N. G_ 



The Academy. 



2513 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED t?94. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter Scate University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution . Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogua. 

JAS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 

YOU 

WANT 

THE 

SHOE 

THAT'S 

ALL 

THE 

GO? 



IP 

SO 

SEE 

US 

lll©e> 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOISTES. 

J. L. J(XNES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

«1U modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best lhat the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

+At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

I Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



2514 The Academy. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE : 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLEE & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 



WINSTON-SALEM. N C. 

PLTTMBEB, 

TINJSTEB, 
COKKECE WORKER 



The Academy. 2515. 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 

imium n ist m tb mi m 

we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and-we 
guarantee every pair of them. 



ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



5516 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 



When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized Scholarships prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms 5330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Ptincipal. 



1793-The Bingham School-1902-03 

Located on the Ashtvitte Plateau since 1891. Milit try. U. S. Army Offi<er de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented ths yeak. from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
#125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office.; Ashev "e, N. C. 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol.27. Winston-Salem, N. C, November, 1903. No. 232. 

Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College ; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

iSiittoriai. 



— Adarge part of this edition of The Academy is given to 
Sesqui-Centennial matters. We believe the story of the founding of 
Wachovia will be of interest to all of our readers, to those who have 
lived in Salem, "and also to those who have not visited our section. 
The Sesqui-Centennial Ode, by Miss Lehman, was published, in 
part, some months ago, but it has been changed somewhat from its 
original form, and our Sesqui-Centennial edition would not be com- 
plete without it.^The picture of the Bethabara Church is given to 
our readers because of the fact that it is the oldest church building 
in the Province (1788), and because around this building the 
Bethabara^day programme will arrange itself. A handsome medal 
has been made under the direction of Mr. W. A. Blair, and is not 
only a fine souvenir but contains on a small space much that should 
be remembered. Mr. B. J. Pfohl has been very active in promoting 
the interests of the occasion, and much' credit will be due him for 
any successes§which may attend the celebration. All that now seems 
to be desirable is fine weather, and if that is given the celebration 
of the completed 150 years of the history of Wachovia will be a 
a mcmorable^one. 

In~this^number we give only the historical sketch of Wachovia. 
In our next we will outline the celebration itself. 



2518 



The Academy. 




BETHABARA CHURCH. 



Sesqui-Centennial Ode. 



BY E. A. LEHMAN. 



It was a dark November day in Seventeen fifty-three 
When, just at eve, a stalwart band were gathered wearily : — 
All travel-stained and worn they came to these Wachovia Hills, 
To found a home, a brotherhood, beside its flowing rills. 
The leaden sky above them bent, in benediction rare, 
As in Hans Wagner's cabin rude, arose their evening prayer. 
Their lullaby that storm v night was the fierce panther's cry ; — 
Like some lost spirit's eerie shriek, — the howling wolf crept by. 
But, safe as bird in quiet nest, sheltered, secure from harms, 
Around them and beneath were spread the everlasting arms. 

No peaceful homes, no busy mills, no sprouting" corn were there, 
But desolation's wildest fugues played through the wintry air : 
The storm-king's banners proudly spread were flaunting, fierce and 
high, 



The Academy. 2519 

And levin bolts came crashing across the darkening sky. 

But God — our fathers' God was there — the same for us and ours, 

And guarded them as he guards us, in danger's trying hour. 

They labored long and patiently, laid their foundations deep, 

And we, in Nineteen hundred-three, their faithful sowing reap. 

We hear it in the busy hum of countless shops and mills ; — 

We see it in the bending grain of fertile fields and hills ; — 

We prize it in the treasured lore of Academic halls ; 

Which for a century has shone forth from our college walls, — 

We hail it in the liberty so highly prized by them, — 

Which echoes from the mountain top to each sequestered glen. 

'Tis right to do them honor, and to their memory twine 
Our fadeless wreaths of laurel, of cypress and of pine ; 
To raise our granite columns, in this Centennial year, 
And thus in three-fold jubilee, honor their memory dear. 
When deadly pestilence its wings of terror o' er them spread, 
And long the scales were poised between the living and the dead. 
Their faith and courage sorely tried, — their trust in God was still 
Their anchor-sheet, as erst they stood upon their graveyard hill. 
About them were twelve new-made graves, of those so dearly prized, 
While, lurking in the shadows deep, the murderous Indians hide. 
What kept them then in darkest days even round that burial sod 
But a strong and child-like leaning upon their covenant God ? 

And so we stand in later days, while they have fallen asleep, 
To guard this noble heritage, that now is ours to keep. 
Methinks they call in gentle tones across the gulf of years, 
Lest we neglect, lest we forget what they have sown in tears, 
They wrought in faith and patience, on an oft-times weary road, 
But they gained a welcome entrance to the presence of their Lord, 
There, free from toil and sorrow, they've joined the whitu-robed 

band 
Mid the uncreated brightness of the glorious heavenly land. 
But we who still are treading the rugged paths of life 
Should bear ourselves as nobly in its daily stress and strife ; 
Should fill our days with action from busy sun to sun, 
Till for us, too, the eventide shall bring our Lord's Well Done.! 



2520 Thh Academy 

The Story of the Founding of Wachovia. 



Many of our readers are strangers to our section and others 
may be young readers to whom the events commemorated by the 
celebration this month are only in part familiar. Hence in this brief 
sketch we will assume that the founding of Wachovia is not a famil- 
iar subject, and will give the chief events of one hundred and fifty 
years ago. 

This date takes us to a time prior to the American Revolution, 
when few settlements had been begun in North Carolina. A godly 
man and eminent scholar, Spangenberg by name, undertook the 
task of selecting a large tract of land suited for the settlement of a 
colony. With surveyors and guides he traversed the entire State 
from Edenton west beyond the present towns of Hickory and Mor- 
ganton, and north nearly to the Virginia line. After untold suffer- 
ings in the wilderness, with hunger and cold, wild animals and hos- 
tile savages threatening them, they at last discovered the well -wa- 
tered tract of land which now forms a large part of Forsyth County. 
This tract was surveyed and purchased, and consisted of a tract of 
land not far from 10 by 15 miles in extent, embracing 100,000 acres, 
or about 150 square miles. This was in 1752. 

A company of brave pioneers left Bethlehem, Penn. , in the 
following year, and, after a journey of 6 weeks, arrived in Wachovia 
at 3 o'clock p. m., Nov. 17, 1753. They found a little cabin, six 
miles north of the present site of Salem, and, taking possession of 
this humble abode, they cheerfully began the work of founding a 
home in the wilderness. 

There were twelve men in this first band of settlers, and they 
at once began the difficult and tedious task. To fully realize what 
this meant we must recall the fact that they had not a single com- 
fort or convenience except what they brought with them in their 
wagon. Bravely they toiled and labored, and earnestly they prayed 
as they toiled. Success soon attended their efforts. Land was 
cleared, houses built, more settlers arrived, and ere long they had a 
prosperous village, which they called Bethabara, the word meaning 
' ' house of passage. ' ' This name was given because they intended 
later to establish the chief town in the center of the large tract of 
land. This was done in 1766, and the new town received the name 
Salem. 



The Academv. 2521 

The first inhabitants of Wachovia were not to have an easy 
time. They did not fear toil and hardship, nor did they shrink from 
summer heat nor winter cold. But when the French and Indian 
War broke out for a long period they were beset by so many dan- 
gers that they dared not call their lives their own. All around them 
men, women and children were brutally murdered by the red men. 
The settlers of Wachovia were men of peace, and we think we see 
in their experiences the fulfillment of the promises of scripture in the 
divine protection given them. Though men- of peace they believed 
thoroughly in the law of self-protection, and early in the war they 
surrounded their village with a palisade of heavy timbers, which not 
only afforded them protection, but the ' ' fort ' ' was a place of refuge 
for the settlers a hundred miles around Bethabara. Many are the 
Indian stories which might be told of those days, when the men sat 
in church with their rifles on their knees, ready for instant action ; 
when the underbrush all around the town had to be cleared to pre- 
vent a surprise ; and when guards had to be sent in every direction 
around the quiet little graveyard before a burial could take place. 
Though numerous victims in the neighborhood fell beneath the 
deadly tomahawk, not one member of the Wachovia colony perished 
by violence. 

Later a deadly illness brode out in their midst, and a number 
of the most useful men and women were called home, with only a 
brief illness of a day or two. Even in this dark and terrible time 
their faith never wavered. 

Then came the American Revolution. In 1776 and the follow- 
ing years the troubles and dangers seemed to multiply. It is prob- 
able that there were a thousand people in Wachovia at this time and 
great prosperity had rewarded their thrift and industry. But their 
firm adherence to a peaceful position brought upon them the suspi- 
cions of both Americans and British, and with the passing of thou- 
sands of troops, under Cornwallis and Green, as well as under minor 
officers of both of the contending armies, not only was their property 
taken from them, but their very lives were threatened. Peacefully 
and fearlessly these pious Moravians continued their industrious life, 
feeding the passing troops, nursing the sick and wounded from 
King's Mountain, from Guilford Court House, and from other scenes 
of violence and carnage, and by the time the war was at an end 



2522 The Academy. 

they had won the friendship and esteem of all good men from far 
and near. 

One more great danger overshadowed them in those early days, 
and that was the hostility of the lawmakers of the newly organized 
republic. They had the friendship of men like Washington, who 
personally visited Wachovia, and of all prominent national states- 
men and generals. But in the State Legislature there was a strange 
and unaccountable animosity which for a time seemed to threaten 
banishment. The story of this struggle is a long and interesting 
one, and yet in this, the last of the great struggles of early days, 
they were mercifully protected and were finally saved from impend- 
ing ruin. Twice was the Legislature later called to meet in Salem, 
and on these occasions the officials met the citizens. After these 
two occasions Wachovia was fully protected, and was never again 
threatened with widespread calamity till the days of the Civil War 
in 1861—65, when it was once more beset by contending armies. 

The story of Wachovia is not only a story of struggle and dan- 
ger, but it is also a narrative of thrift and prosperity. Had we space 
we could tell of the various lines of effort which brought happiness 
to themselves and to those about them. 

Music they loved, and in the very earliest days we read of beau- 
tiful singing, and of trumpets, stringed instruments and organs. The 
pipe organ in the Salem Moravian church was built in 1800, and has 
been in continual use for 103 years. The list of musicians and their 
compositions would be a large and creditable one. 

So, too, the professional men, in medicine, in science, in edu- 
cation, in oratory were equally well known as men of success and 
ability. 

The same is true of men in business and in the trades. As 
builders we see the results of their efforts in the many houses more 
than a century old which are in a state of fine preservation to-day ; 
the Bethabara church was erected in I78S, yet after 115 years it has 
just received a new slate roof, and seems to promise another century 
of usefulness. 

In education, Salem Academy and College and the Salem 
Boys' School each have their uninterrupted history of a century, 
and yet are both more largely attended now than ever before. 

Thus we could go on telling of the history of Wachovia, in 



The Academy 2523 

peace and in war, but from the above brief outline the reader will 
recognize the fact that the 5000 Moravians in Wachovia, reinforced 
by their many friends, will do well to celebrate the founding of the 
colony in a proper and becoming manner. 



A Rare Treat. 



We give below a communication from Prof. Shirley. It will 
at once be seen that this will be a rare treat for entertainment-loving 
people during the winter. There is not a number which is not of 
the highest order, and the price of the tickets, $2.00 for the entire 
five occasions, is remarkably low when the nature of the attractions 
is considered. The single ticket admissions will be 75 cents. The 
following is the communication : 

concert course. 

Arrangements are being made for a series of concerts to be 
given at the Academy. The proceeds above expenses to be given 
to the Auditorium organ fund. These concerts will have the great- 
est artistic and educational value, and no pupil can afford to miss 
hearing so fine a series, especially at the price which we have been 
able to make for the course. 

The Schubert String Quartet will give the first concert on 
November sixteenth. Opportunities of hearing chamber music in 
its purest and most perfect form are deplorably lacking, and the 
wide reputation of this Quartet assures us of an evening of unalloyed 
pleasure. 

A second evening's entertainment will be given by Misses 
Hartley and Priest, pianist and violinist, who are among the most 
promising of the younger artists ot the day. 

One evening will be given to Readings by Mrs. Miriam Frances 
Bagley. Mrs. Bagley's style of reading is being described as en- 
tirely different from that of the stereotype elocutionists, and a 
delightful evening may be expected. 

The simple announcement that Mr. J. Fred Wolle, of Bethle- 
hem Bach Festival fame, has consented to give an organ recital, is 



2524 The Academy. 

sufficient to give an interest to the series amongst not only all Mora- 
vians, but also all musical people of the vicinity. 

Last comes the Song Recital by Mr. Frederick Martin, the 
eminent baritone, who will appear the first week in February, and 
the glowing reports of his singing by those who have heard him 
lead us to expect much of this closing recital. 

It is some years since such an artists' course has been given at 
the Academy, and it is hoped that the success of this series may 
lead to an establishing of an annual course. 

The faculty of the Music Department have charge of the enter- 
prise. H. A. Shirley. 

1887— 1888— 1889. 



Death of Rev. M. E. Grunert, former Principal, at his home in 
Nazareth, Penn. June 4, 1887. 

Vacation girls start to the mountains. July 26, 1887. 

Death of little Harold, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Clewell. 
Aug. 20, 1887. 

• Electric lights used on the streets of the Twin City for the first 
time. August 26, 1887. 

South-west room of the Principal's house fitted up for Dr. 
Rondthaler's private office. Oct. 1887. 

Part of the reading-room converted into dormitory space, and 
new accommodations provided for the Library. Connection made 
between the second story of Main Hall and South Hall. Septem- 
ber, 1887. 

The large pulpit taken out of the Academy Chapel. Novem- 
ber, 1887. 

New silverware supplied for the dining-room. November, 
1887. 

Literary Society organized among the pupils. November, 
1887. 

The " Home" opened in the Southern part of Salem. 

Merit cards for day pupils used for the first time this term. 

An exodus took place from the Euterpean Literary Society, 
recently organized. The name taken by the new organization is 
the Hesperian Literary Society. 

" Founder's Day" holidav. November 16, 1887. 



The Academy. 2525 

Euterpean Literary Society entertainment. November, 1887. 

Time of the Mid-Winter Concert changed from December to 
the middle of January, 1888. 

Two pianos purchased for the Music Department. January 1, 
1888. 

Large new stove placed in the lower hall of the main building. 
January, 1888. 

Wax tapers graced the dining-room at the Christmas dinner, 
which was an occasion of unusual interest. 

Studio removed to the fourth story of Main Hall, and the old 
studio in South Hall alcoved and changed into a dormitory. Feb- 
ruary, 1888. 

Dr, Rondthaler resigned the Principalship of the Academy, 
Mr. Clewell being his successor. May, 1889. 

New catalogue shows 237 pupils for the year (faculty not in- 
cluded in the list of names. ) 

Public calisthenic drill. April, 1888. 

Fence around the square in front of the Academy removed. 
April, 1888. 

Commencement date June 3-6, 1888. Dr. Thomas Hume 
delivered the Baccalaureate Sermon. Number of graduates, 30. 
Dr. Rondthaler delivered the address. Col. A. H. Belo, of Gal- 
veston, Tex., presented the diplomas. 

Society banquet, May 24, 1888. 

No vacation girls this year. 

Reception to Senior and Middle classes in the Academy by 
Mr. and Mrs. Clewell. May 25, 1888. 

Special parlor car, " City of Birmingham," ran from Texas to 
Salem, N. C. , with pupils from that State and intermediate points. 
Distance, 1900 miles without change. August, 1888. 

Trip to mountains by teachers and pupils. August, 1888. 

Alumnae Society adopted badge for the society. 1888. 

Day School department moved from Main Hall to South Hall. 
September, 1888. 

Sick room, large room, made into two rooms. The infirmary 
thus has five rooms for its use. August, 1888. 

Large mail box placed in the lower hall of Main Hall. Sep- 
tember, 1888. 



2526 The Academy. 

" How to Get to S. F. A." published. August, 1888. 

Miss Katharine W. Evans enters as head of the Vocal Depart- 
ment. September, 1888. 

Annex Hall commenced. August, 1888. 

Rev. Mr. Pearson visited the Academy. September, 1888. 

Physiological plates added to the collection. October, 1888. 

Annex Hall finished. November, 1888. 

Square in front of the Academy ploughed preparatory to im- 
proving the entire plot of ground. December, 1888. 

Prof. Markgraff married. December, 1888. 

Mid-winter Concert. January 22, 1889. 

Euterpean Society moved to the fourth floor of Main Hall, 
purchased piano and other articles. February, 1889. 

Mr. R. Chitty, night-watchman, stricken with paralysis. Jan- 
uary, 1889. 

Dr. Rondthaler started on a trip to the Holy Land and other 
countries in the Orient. February, 1889. 

Dr. DuFour lectured in the Academy. February, 188& 

Euterpean Society gave entertainment in the Chapel. Febru- 
ary 22, 1889. 

Hesperian Society located on first floor of Main Hall, 4 stories 
above Euterpean Hall. March, 1889. 

Library Annex added to Library. March, 1889. 

Small bell on portico cracked. February 25, 1889. 

"Mendelssohn Evening" given by Prof. Markgraff in chapel. 
March 9, 1888. 

Hesperian Society Entertainment in chapel. April 5, 1889. 

Seniors visited Pilot Mountain. April, 1889. 

Calisthenic drill (public). April, 1889. 

Main and South Halls painted. May, 1889. 

Commencement, May 31 to June 4. Sermon by Rev. Thomas 
McCallie, D. D. , of Tennessee. Oration by Dr. Charles Lee Smith. 
Diplomas presented by Rev. W. W. Moore. 

Post graduate course established. Summer, 1889. 

Senior and middle classes entertained at Principal's house. 
May 28, 1889. 

Society Banquet. May 24, 1889. 



The Academy. 2527 

OTijrrmtcle antr (^osistp. 



— We were glad to have Mrs. Speas with us on a brief visit 
recently. 

Mrs. Kime spent a few days in Salem quite recently with her 
daughter. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ware, of Florida, spent a few days with their 
daughter, Nellie. 

— Mrs. Peebles (Belle Chaffin) was in Salem in October, 
and was with Julia, much to the joy of the latter. 

— The first vesper service was held the end of October, Rev. 
J. K. Pfohl delivering the address and Miss Morrison furnishing 
the solo. On the first Sunday in November the special song was 
furnished by the 10th Room pupils, with Miss Bulluck as the 
soloist. 

— Work on the new union passenger depot has been begun. 
The location is the same as that of the old depot, but the new 
modern structure will be a great convenience to the travelling public. 
The station will be used by both the Southern and the Norfolk & 
Western Railways. It is needless to say that this improvement will ■ 
be welcomed by the members of the school. 

— We acknowledge with thanks the presentation of a copy of 
Blum s Farmer s and Planter s Almanac for the year 1904 to each 
room in the school. This publication is a most interesting and use- 
ful one. Prof. Wurreshcke was accustomed to say that the scien- 
tific information contained in the month pages was far more valu- 
able than was usually supposed by the general reader. This publi- 
cation was begun in the year 1827, and has been continuously issued 
each year since that time. The circulation is 50,000, a large edi- 
tion when we consider that Blum' s Almanac is always sold for a 
fixed price, while other almanacs are given away by the thousand. 
The publishers, Messrs. Crist & Keehln, will please accept our 
thanks for their courtesy in this matter. 



2528 The Academy. 

■ — We most cordially endorse the Winter Evening Entertain- 
ment Course under the direction of the Music Faculty of the Acad- 
emy. Every programme will be of the highest order of artistic ex- 
cellence, and we can assure our friends that they will have no rea- 
son to regret an investment of $2.00 for a season ticket. 

— A description of the delightful celebration of Founder's Day 
at Nissen Park was crowded out by press of other matter. It will 
appear next month. 



Special Offer. 



From the present time till January 4, 1904, we will make the 
following special offer to the readers of The Academy in connec- 
tion with the renewals of subscriptions and the History of Wachovia : 

The regular price of History of Wachovia is $2.00 
Subscription for The Academy, . . .50 



$2.50 



To any one sending us $1.50 and 16 cents for postage we will send 
the book to any address in the United States and will send The 
Academy one year. This applies to new as well as to old sub- 
scribers. 



Subscriptions. 



Miss Bettie Cox, Mr. Salem Wilder, Mr. W. B. Hatcher, Miss 

Mae McMinn, Mr. Matthews, Harvey, Miss Kate Kilbuck, 

Miss Carrie Ogburn, Miss Nellie Clark, Mrs. Wra. Conrad, Mrs. 
D. S. Ogletree, Mrs. Kate Fuller, Mrs. W. D. Downs, Miss Adah 
Petway, Miss Lena Sessoms, Miss Annie Walker, Mrs. W. O. Cox, 
Mrs. H. T. Bahnson, Miss A. VanVleck, Mrs. Susan V. Hart, Miss 
Fannie Goodman, Miss Marvin Cole. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 

This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 

EDITORIAL STAFF : 

Agnes Belle Goldsby, '04 — Editor-in-Chief. 

Mary B. Gudger, '04, ) A ■ . . -,-, ... 
Frances Powers! '04, I Asslstant Edltors - 

Helen M. Blandford, '05 — Literary Editor. 

Carrie Levy, '06 — Exchange Editor. 

Corinne Baskin, '04 — Business Manager. 

IHtutorial. 



No shade, no shine, no fruit — 

No flowers, no leaves — November." 



— In the last issue of our paper we noticed that both the Eu- 
terpean and the Hesperian began in rhyme. Neither editor 
knew that the other had chosen a ' ' pom " as a suitable beginning, 
so we have come to the conclusion that it was another case of great 
minds running- in the same channel. 



— We hope that when The Academy offers you its Christmas 
and New Year' s greetings that it will be ' ' clothed anew ' ' this time 
in green and gold, and that within its covers you may catch a 
glimpse of some portion of our Alma Mater or peep into some pic- 
turesque nook or corner of this quaint Moravian town nestled among 
the hills of North Carolina. 



— Woman's first duty is to be beautiful. Her second is to 
remain so. 



2530 The Euterpean. 

Critique on •' Boner's Lyrics." 



A. B. G. 



In the September Academy mention was made of "Boner's 
Lyrics. ' ' We wish to call attention to the fact that this collection 
of beautiful poems deserves a recognition and praise such as it has 
not heretofore received. 

Had the author been endowed with a little of that force and 
passion which Byron so lavishly wasted, he might have ranked with 
Edgar Allen Poe and other great lyric poets. We might then fitly 
apply to him the very words which he himself used in his poem on 
' ' Poe' s Cottage at Fordham ' ' : 

' ' Fate found a rare soul pliant 
And rung her changes well — 
He struck high chords and splendid, 
Wherein were finely blended 
Tones that unfinished ended 
With his unfinished days." 

The picture of Poe's Cottage is almost an exact representation 
of the Nathaniel Vogler homestead on Walnut Street in this dear 
little town of Salem. 

Among Boner's other best poems we cite the tragical one, 
' ' The Wolf, ' ' rooted deep in his own sad experiences. ' ' The 
'Moon-Loved Land" is exquisite. "Home from Camp-meeting" 
and ' ' Moonrise in the Pines ' ' are descriptive pieces, and in them 
both we can plainly see our beloved Southland as she appears on a 
lovely, still summer night. 

In "The Silver Wedding" he tells how " the lordly Potomac 
comes down through the hills," wrapped in his " mantle of green." 
This ' ' gay young cavalier ' ' merrily pursues his way, foaming and 
splashing joyously onward until he hears the ' ' sweet voice of the 
fair Shenandoah." He meets the " beautiful nymph of the valley," 
and together they dash through the mountain gate of Harper's 
Ferry, and at last are wed in Nature's great cathedral. 

" Hunting Muscadines" is a peaceful little idyl of the Yadkin. 

The tender beauty and pathos contained in these poems must 
touch every heart. 



The Euterpean. 2531 

Troubles in the East. 

H. M. B. 



Just how Japan and Russia are goiing to settle their great ques- 
tion regarding Korea and Manchuria is difficult to ascertain, and 
negotiations are now being conducted between the Japanese govern- 
ment and the Russian minister at Tokio. 

More than eighteen months ago Russia agreed to evacuate 
Manchuria entirely by October 8, 1903, but she has not even in 
part carried out this agreement, and gives as her excuse that China 
would not agree to certain demands which we feel sure no nation 
would grant, and when she promised to evacuate in the first place 
no concessions were made known. What business she has there no 
one knows, but if Japan and Russia go to war China will do her 
best to put her out. As far as Japan is concerned Russia may hold 
Manchuria, but she could never permit her to have a single foot of 
Korean soil. Japan is determined to have a settlement with Russia 
by a treatv which she must keep or war will be the result. Surelv 
Russia's ever increasing military preparations and Japan's nearly 
completed equipments point to a settlement in some way. 

This trouble between Japan and Russia is not merely an Eastern 
trouble, but Western nations, too, are interested in it. Great Brit- 
ain and France are trying to hold back their allies as they do not 
care to have their new friendship thus broken. That Russia has a 
larger fleet on paper than Japan is true, but Japan's fleet is more 
modern, and has proved worthy of service. 

Russia has made us a promise by guaranteeing to us an open 
door in Manchuria, but her promises to us may fail as do her prom- 
ises to China. 

The distance between us and the Spaniards, Turks or Chinese, 
or any other country is very great, and we are so apt to get a wrong 
impression. Think of the idea the Northerners have of the ill- 
treatment of the colored race in the South, and the distance between 
the North and the South is very small compared to that of the 
United States and other nations. The stories cabled us concerning 
the massacres of the Christians by the Turks, and the greed of Rus- 
sia in trying to gain territory to which she has no right are very 
wonderful, but we ought to hear both sides of the story before pass- 
ing judgment. 



2532 The Euterpean. 

Bcrofts of tlje 23ag. 

"The Call of the Wild," by Jack London, stands forth among 
the numberless books constantly issuing from the press, like a clear 
cut gem among very common pebbles. The life in the Klondike 
gives a freshness to the book which we are not apt to find elsewhere. 
Its psychological trend, with the primordial longings, the ' ' call of 
the wild" instincts in Buck, the dog,' that finally lead him back to 
his wild brethren, give a raciness and a charm to the book which is 
difficult to define. 

"The Mettle of the Pasture," by James Lane Allen, is rather 
disappointing, though it has undeniable beauty of description. 

" Gordon Keith," by Thomas Nelson Page, is a pleasing story, 
but Page's best work was done in his shorter stories. 

' ' The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come ' ' was written by 
John Fox, Jr. It is causing quite a sensation in the reading world. 
The simplicity and pathos of a boy's life among the Kentucky 
mountaineers is shown as Chad Buford kneels in the woods and 
prays : ' ' God, I haint nuthin' but a boy, but I got to ack like a 
man now. I'm goin' now. I don't believe you keer much, and 
seems like I bring every body bad luck, but thy ways is inscrutable, 
leastways that's what the circuit rider says, an' I haint got a word 
more to say. Amen." 

Life in the blue grass college in the simple days before the war ; 
class feeling between the mountaineer and the ' ' furriner ' ' ; the way 
in which Kentucky was rent asunder by the civil strife, and the fa- 
ding glory of Morgantown are all bound together in a beautiful love 
story. 

The book has many attractive qualities and Mr. Fox has shown 
sdmirable writing. It is potent with the wine of Kentucky life, as 
he outlines the steady development of a Southern gentleman from a 
waif, as blood tells in the mountain foundling and intellect, dignity 
and fine feeling grow with years. 

There is a splendid cut of Mr. Fox in the September number 
of The World. 



Joe — " My brother had over fifty thousand men under him. 
Alex — " He must have been a great general." 
Joe — " No. He was up in a balloon." 



The Euterpean. 2533 

j&ocictp Notes anti ?iocals. 



M. B G AND F P. 



We have been trying to make Society meetings as pleasant and 
enjoyable as possible. 

A few evenings ago we had quite an interesting debate : ' ' Re- 
solved, that married life is happier than single. ' ' The affirmative 
gained their point. Many good arguments were given by the con- 
testants of both sides, and the hot discussion caused much amuse- 
ment. An especially rfdiculous incident was related by the nega- 
tives of a woman with seven children whose husband left her when 
he was most needed. At the close of the debate the poor woman 
had been married and divorced many times, and her husband — 
well, he was torn to pieces. 

The extra chairs which we ordered some time ago arrived the 
latter part of October, and have been placed in the hall. We also 
put up our stove last month, and we begin to realize that winter 
really is near at hand as we gather about the cheery hre on these 
chilly, autumnal evenings. 

We still find it necessary to have initiations each month. We 
are always glad to welcome new girls. 



— Miss Blanche Holt, of Oak Ridge, N. C. , a former Acad- 
emy girl, spent a day in Winston last week. Many of her old 
friends were delighted to see her. 

— The friends of Mary Agnes Slayden were very sorry to 
hear that she will not return to school again this vear. 

— Bessie Bowden, who has been ill for the past two weeks, is 
some better. We hope she will continue to improve, and soon be 
able to resume her studies. 

— Kathaleen Page, who has been quite ill, is improving 
rapidly, has left the Infirmary. 

— On Friday evening, Oct. 23d, the Sixth Room girls enter- 
tained in honor of Miss Wolle's birthday. Dr. Clfavell and 
Bishop Rondthaler were among the few friends invited. Refresh- 
ments were served, and the evening proved to be quite a pleasant 



2534 The Euterpean. 

— The first Vesper Service of the year was^ held in the Acade- 
my Chapel, Sunday afternoon, Oct. 25th. Rev. J. Kenneth Pfohl 
was with us, and spoke a few encouraging words. 

— Kittie Mae McDonnell, Glenn's sister, arrived a day 
or so ago, and will remain here the rest of the term. 



Old Blandford Chapel. 



H. M. B. 



The murmuring winds seem to be speaking the requiem of the 
scattered worshippers who knelt before the shrine of the old "Bland- 
ford Chapel," now only a pile of ivy-covered ruins. The sun, that 
in the days of ' ' auld lang syne ' ' shone brightly upon the paths of 
many of the noblest men this country has ever known, now gilds 
their lonely graves around and about the sanctuary. Only these 
picturesque old walls, covered with names and verses, remain of the 
church where many of our ancestors gathered to offer praise to God 
in times of peace and in times of war. How our hearts would be 
stirred if we could call back the many who have carelessly roved 
about as we do now among these old ruins. 



En Passant. 



A. b. G. 



' ' Kind reader, do not think it strange, 
If our department boasts no exchange ; 
We have hoped, are hoping still 
The next month surely will 
From every college and school in range, 
Bring us proof — " Exchangers do exchange." 



— " Say, Jack, do you know what is worse than a giraffe with 
sore throat ?' ' 
"No." 
"Why, a centipede with corns." 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Florence Moorman — Editor-in-chief. 
Cammie Lindley — Assistant Editor. 
Ora Hunter — Literary Editor. 
Brietz Thom— Exchange Editor. 
Rusha Sherrod — Business Manager. 



?£trttorial Department. 



Another Snooze. 



First we eat an' next we eat an' next we eat an' then 
We go to bed an' git right up an' start to eat again. 
One-half our life we eat an' sleep, an' I'm a tellin' you 
'At them's about the slickest things we mortals have to do. 
Fer eatin' ain't no work at all, an' sleepin's better yet, 
And once we're cuddled up in bed we feel just right, you bet ! 
An' when the mornin' comes we try to rigger out some ruse, 
In that warm bed to turn just once an' take another snooze. 

It's work a-feedin' growin' boys ; they never git enuff, 

An' eat most anythin' that comes an' never call it tough. 

Dispepsy's suthin' they don't have — no trouble on that score — 

They eat an apple, skins an' all an' never leave no core. 

You'll never git 'em off to bed while they can keep awake ; 

An' when there's suthin' goin' on don't try, for goodness' sake ; 

You'll need your strength to git 'em up ; of course, they won't 

refuse, 
But say : " All right, we'regittin' up !" — then take another snooze. 



— Mrs. W. L. Moorman, of Lynchburg, Va. , tp^nt several days 
this month with her daughters, Florence and Corinna. 



2536 The Hesperian. 

— We are indebted to the Euterpeans for one of the most en- 
joyable evenings that we have ever spent in the Academy. On 
Friday, October 15th, we "dressed in our best" and gathered in 
the Academy Chapel for an evening of pleasure. As we entered 
the door we were welcomed by the officers of both Societies, and 
then passed on to promenade or chat gaily as we chose. The chapel 
was more attractive than we deemed possible. Masses of brilliant 
autumn foliage hid the rostrum, while around the walls and over 
the doors were twined the Society colors, blue and white with the 
yellow and white of the school. Everywhere were easy chairs, cosy 
corners and nooks under the grand old palms. In the centre of 
the chapel, under the blue and white, was served by two of the So- 
ciety's most charming young ladies, that most popular of all popu- 
lar drinks, punch. 

Later in the evening delicious refreshments were served, and 
it is needless to add, enjoyed. A black triangle, with the gold let- 
ters, " E. L. S.," reproducing the Society pin, made a dainty sou- 
venir of the pleasant evening, which will ever be remembered. 



-Man's sole support — leather. 
-Latest thing in boots — stockings. 
-Faint purse ne'er won fair lady. 
-Improving your time — clock repairing. 
-The greatest business on earth — farming. 
-Question of the hour— what's the time? 



— Last Sunday night we were very much frightened by an 
alarm of fire so near us. We are all sorry for Uncle Aleck, but 
are rejoicing it was not the Academy. 

— We are glad to know that we have enough chairs now to 
accommodate all of our new members. 

— Pescud and Pattie Chisman spent last Saturday and Sun- 
day at their home in Pine Hall. 

— We are very sorry to know that Ethel Corbix, one of our 
members, continues to be confined to her room. 



The Hesperian. 2537 

The Natural Bridge. 



F. M., 05 



The Falls of Niagara and the Natural Bridge are justly esteemed 
the most remarkable curiosities in North America. So unusual is 
the beauty, mingled with sublimity of these natural curiosities, that 
thoughtless people have sometimes been known to characterize them 
as "freaks of Nature." But in Nature, — great, beneficent and do- 
ing all things in order — there are no freaks. She shows her power 
in the great waterfall of Niagara and arch of Natural Bridge as she 
shows her beauty and grace in the sweetest flower that blows. 

Since about the middle of the last century the Natural Bridge 
has been an object of curiosity and admiration, not only in America 
but in Europe as well. Nearly every traveller from foreign coun- 
tries who comes to this western world to compare its natural gran- 
deur with the grandeur of art and architecture in the countries he 
has left, goes first in the north to visit the grand old cataract, span- 
ned with its rainbow, and then in the South to visit the world- 
famous arch. 

The Natural Bridge is in the south-eastern corner of Rock- 
bridge county, Virginia, in the midst of the wild scenery of the Blue 
Ridge region, so near, on the western side, as to be almost under 
the shadow of those mountains. 

What is the mystery of the origin of this wonderful structure ? 
Science can do nothing toward giving a positive answer to this 
question. It cannot be possible that this prodigy was caused by a 
volcanic upheaval, for the whole arch seems to be formed of one 
and the same stone. Nor could it have been caused by a current 
of water, for in supposing the current we must suppose likewise that 
this current has had the force to break down and carry to a great 
distance a mass of five thousand cubic fathoms, for there certainly 
remains no sign of such an operation. 

Therefore, perhaps, the safest and best conclusion is that of 
De Chastellux, that " it is to the labors only of the Creator that we 
owe the magnificent construction of the Natural Bridge. 

If we consider this bridge simply as a picturesque object, we 
are awed at the majesty with which it towers in the valley. It is 



253S The Hesperian. 

at the foot of the great arch, on the edge of the little stream which 
flows under ft, that we can best judge of its structure. There we 
see the spurs, backbendings and profiles which so strongly resemble 
architecture. The arch is not complete, the eastern part being 
smaller than the western on account of the elevation of the mountain 
on the eastern side. 

But let us pass to circumstances connected with this great nat- 
ural curiosity. One instance of the daring in venturing to the edge 
•of the precipice has been kept alive by tradition. In the early part 
of the past century Miss Randolph, a lovely belle of Virginia, with 
a party, visited Natural Bridge. Reaching the summit of the 
Bridge the party cautiously approached the brink and were gazing 
into the gulf below when a young man, pointing to the broken 
stump of a huge cedar, separated by an intervening cleft from the 
main structure, expressed his opinion that no human being lived 
daring enough to stand erect upon it. A cry of terror arose from 
the entire party as Miss Randolph brushed past and, with one bound, 
stood upon the dizzy pinnacle. For an instant the daring young- 
girl stood erect, and then at a single bound regained her former 
position, and asked if any gentleman dared do .as much. 

It remains only before closing to speak of the hazardous 
attempts made by many to climb the rocky sides of the arch and 
reach the summit. This has never been done, but some have gone 
a considerable distance and recorded it by cutting their names on 
the surface at the highest point reached by them. High up among 
these names, it is reported, may be found that of no less great a 
personage than George Washington, who, strong and fond of manly 
sports, was seized with the ambition to ascend the precipice and 
inscribe his name upon the surface of the rock. 

The highest point ever reached by any venturesome climber is 
said to have been attained by Mr. James Piper, at the time a stu- 
dent of Washington College, later a State Senator. Determining 
to ascend as high as was possible for human being to ascend, Mr. 
Piper commenced climbing the precipice. Taking advantage of 
every ledge and cleft, he finally reached a point which seemed 
directly under the great arch. Far above the names — fully fifty 
feet above that of Washington — on up the steep sides he climbed 
.until he stopped at an elevation of one .hundred and seventy-five 



The Hesperian. 2539 

feet from the earth below. His heart had failed him. His only 
ambition now was to descend with safety from his frightful perch. 
Under these circumstances the young gentleman acted with nerve 
and presence of mind. Slowly and cautiously he divested himself 
first of one shoe, then the other, next drew off his coat and threw 
these articles down into the gulf below, without daring to look in 
the direction in which they fell. Then, clinging closely to the face 
of the precipice and balancing his body carefully, he tottered inch 
by inch, hanging between life and death, until he reached the ground 
below — safe, sound and smiling, after his perilous feat, during which 
he had stood face to face with one of the most horrible of deaths. 



iExdjange department. 



Brietz Thom. 

— It gives us much pleasure to see our exchange table filling 
up so rapidly. 

— We are very glad to find the Doane Owl, from Crite, Ne- 
braska. It contains several well-written articles. 

— The special opening number of The Crimson is particularly 
interesting. 

— We bid a hearty welcome the Hall Boy. The October num- 
ber is of special interest on account of a letter from the ' ' Oldest 
Living Hall Boy, ' ' telling all about him. 

— From Bethlehem, Pa., we have The Comenian. "As She 
Saw It " is an interesting story. 

— The Davidson College Magazine is unusually good. We 
find several instructive and at the same time interesting articles in 
the October number. 



— One of our number wishes to know if Shakespeare wrote 
"To Have and To Hold." 

— Another rushed into one of the study-parlors and announced 
' ' There is red fever all over Winston. ' ' 



2540 The Hesperian. 

ILiterarg i^otes. 



ORA HUNTER. 



— " The Red Keggers," by Eugene Thwing, stands out promi- 
nently as a master-piece of dramatic fiction. It is an intensely in- 
teresting story, full of thrilling scenes of the Michigan lumber camp. 
The tale is not only an interesting and an amusing one, but it also 
has a healthy moral tone which is quite refreshing and rather unus- 
ual. It reminds one of Ralph Connor's pure, wholesome stories. 

— "The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come," by John Fox, 
Jr. , is one of the most popular novels of to-day. It is full of the true 
Southern courtesy and the crudities of mountain life. It would be 
hard to find a fresher or more interesting book among the new pub- 
lications. 

— "The Trifler",is a delightful little love comedy, by Archi- 
bald Eyre. It is a very witty tale, clothed in good English, and 
bids fair to be very popular. 

— "An April Princess," by Constance Smedley, is a very 
amusing, racy little affair, the very thing to make one forget the 
blues and worries. 



— The Juniors are very proud of their new picture of the Statue 
of Liberty, presented by Dr. Clewell. 

— We are very proud of our sister Society in the way they en- 
tertained us on October 16th. 



" I Just Keep Still." 



"How is it, Mary," asked one girl of another, "that y 
never get into scrapes like the rest of us?" 

" Because I don't talk back," answered Mary prompth 
" When a girl says hard things to me I just keep still." 



ou 



The Academy. 2541 



Special Price till Jan., 1904. $1 50. 

HISTORY OF WACHOVIA 

IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

By Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

. Cloth bound, 4.00 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title 
Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 
sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils- 
will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 
carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure 

The Charlotte Observer publishes an extended review of the above 
work, concluding with the following lines : 

"A very instructive chapter comes near the close of the volume, giv- 
ing a history of the Moravian Church, or " Unitas Fratrum," as they styled 
themselves. The last chapter gives a sketch of the lives of the eleven 
Principals of Salem Academy and Col ege, from Samuel Kransch, in i8o2 r 
down lo the present incumbant. This chapter is written by Miss Lehman, 

" We are still indebted to Dr. Clewell for giving us the history of this 
unique and interesting people. Whoever has visited o d Salem, and seen 
its unique houses, its shaded groves, its vener ible graveyard with recum- 
bent tombstones, its church with its beautiful and impressive ceremony, its 
venerable gr veyard with recumbent tombstones, its church with its beau- 
tiful and impressive ceremony, its far famed schools, its evidences of thrift 
and sobriety, whoever has seen all these things has wished that he might 
learn more of the simple, earnest, Christian people that h: j ve builded here 
so well. 

" Dr. Clewell has made judicious use of his scurces in writing this his- 
tory, and has told his story in a st aightforward, scholarly manner. He has 
evidently gone th ough with much pa ient and laborious research in the 
prosecution of his task. The result, a handsomely bound volume in cloth 
and gold, stands very much to his credit, and is a cause for just pride both 
to himself und the people he represents " 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



2542 The Academy. 

James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Correspondence solicited 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream'Puffs, ~\ 20 cts. Vanilla Wafers, ~) 10 cts. 

Crescents, > per Kisses, V per 

Cup Cakes, J dozen Macaroons, ) dozen 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



Iwqww WmMm Yea M&e« 



The Academy. 



2543 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment ot rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs. Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others ttiat httve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a stock that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others that will 
please the most exclusive and exacting taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOBOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



2544 The Academy. 

10 2cl YEA.R 



ADD COLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, N, C. 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos (.Comenius, and, throngh the four 
centuries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parents who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the- 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ing of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors, 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which will, 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



The Academy 



2545 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED U794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogus. 

J AS. P. BROWER, A. M. ( Head Master. 



THE 
SHOE 



ALi 



IP 
SO 

SEE 

US 



GO? 



way m mmm 

WINSTON, 
N. C. 



Bi 



HOTEL CTOZLsnSS- 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DA.Y. 

At Depot ask/or Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



2546 The Academy. 

OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE ; 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, N~. C. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBEE, 

TINNEE, 
COENICE WOEKEE. 



The Academy. 2547 

HEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought 10 the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 



EOSENBACHEE'S 
DEPAETMENT STOEES. 



2548 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 



"When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place vour son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country borne in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railwa}'. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized. Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful out door 
■sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomely illustrated catalogue, sent free. 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins fanuary 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S , J . BLUM . Principal. 



1793-The Bingham Schooi-1902-03 

Located on the Asheville Plateau shee 18.91 Milit try. ['. cf. Arnijj Oflne'- de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, fiom Massayhu«ets n\ ■! ! a >> ".1 
on the North to Texas and Florida on thin South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., P <t Oth. e. Ashev .lo, N ' '. 



THE AC ADEMY. 

Vol. 27. Winston-Salem, N. C, December, 1903. No. 233. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



ISiutotial. 



The celebration of the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of 
the arrival of the first Moravian settlers in Wachovia, North Caro- 
lina, was an occasion of great interest and was a marked success. 
The plans were carried out in all respects as previously arranged, 
and all things united to contribute to the enjoyment of those who 
participated. The weather was fine, the crowds were large, the 
interest was marked, and the results will be felt for many years in 
the increased interest in the Christian work of the province. We 
devote a number of pages to the account of the celebration since 
the occasion was one of more than local interest. 



— We call attention to the special offer, which is made till Jan- 
uary 1st, to give one year's subscription to The Academy and a 
History of Wachovia in North Carolina for $1.50. The regular 
price of these two is $2.50. Former pupils will be interested in the 
history of the section where they attended school, patrons will find 
it will provide them with information about the school and section, 



2550 The Academy. 

and those who reside in Winston-Salem should be provided with 
the history of their own home. The price of the history after Jan. 
1 will be $2.00 as in the past. In case the book is sent by mail 16c. 
should be added for postage. 



— The task of caring for two hundred young people on the 
occasion of the recent visit to Bethabara was not an easy one, but 
everything passed off nicely and without accident. The special cars 
provided by the railroad authorities were utilized on the journey, 
but upon the return the company sought accommodations at the 
wrong end of the long train, and hence our own cars were not occu- 
pied. We were thankful that our day was not marred by any 
accident. 



— The two new Vesper Services, one prepared for general occa- 
sions and one for the Advent and Christmas season, have been 
received very heartily by the school. The manner in which the 
responses are read and the hymns sung shows the interest, and the 
carefully prepared special programmes contribute much to the en- 
joyment of the half-hour of worship. 



— The continued arrival of new pupils has necessitated pro- 
viding more space for the Annex Hall company. A very neat and 
cosy room has been fitted up for a number of pupils on the upper 
floor of the infirmary. Four girls occupy this space, which gives 
them an attractive sleeping-hall and sitting-room. With two south 
and one west window, and with the newly finished surroundings, 
and, we may add, with the jovial little party who chose to occupy 
these new quarters, we feel sure their winter will be comfortable and 
happy. 



— The Christmas recess will begin Friday, Dec. IS, at 2 p. m. , 
and recitations will begin at 8:45 a. m., Monday, Jan. 4. This 
recess has been made longer than usual with the expectation that 
parents and pupils will cooperate with the school in having a full 
attendance till the close of recitations and in beginning promptly 
at the day and hour named. Any deviation from the above will 
come under the head of unexcused absences. 



The Academy. 2551 

— The number of pupils who remain in the school during the 
Christmas holidays is large, and a Christmas in Salem carries with 
it pleasures and experiences which will be remembered for many 
years. When it is the pleasure of pupils to remain in the school 
every effort will be made to supply the brightest Christmas cheer. 



—It is a source of regret to the management of the school that 
in a few instances the rule prohibiting the sending of boxes of pro- 
visions from home is not observed. Both patrons and pupils should 
heartily unite to carry out this wise provision ; except at Christmas 
no boxes of provisions can be received by pupils without transgress- 
ing this rule, which has been in force for many years. We trust 
that we will not be further embarrassed in this respect. 



— The Star Course which has been arranged by Prof. Shirley 
and a number of those connected with the Music Department, prom- 
ises to be not only a source of enjoyment to the pupils, but also a 
positive profit. The Schubert Ouartett of Boston certainly made a 
fine impression in the opening concert, and with the number made 
up of such attractions as Wolle, of the great Bach Festival fame, 
and other interesting programmes, we predict a series of evenings 
far in advance of anything given in recent vears. The school and 
the community owe a debt of gratitude to Prol. Shirley and his 
associates for their disinterested work in connection with the Star 
Course. 



The Sesqui-Centennial Celebration. 



Last month we gave a brief sketch of the plans of the celebra- 
tion of the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the arrival of the 
first settlers in Wachovia. Since then the celebration has taken 
place. The occasion was one of deep interest, and was thoroughly 
enjoyed by the school as well as by the community. 

The programme covered four days. The first was the unveil- 
ing of several monuments, and the reading of appropriate papers at 
the very spot where the first buildings were erected. This was at 
Bethabara, 6 miles north of Winston-Salem. 



2552 The Academy. 

The second was the meeting of the Wachovia Historical Society 
which took place on Saturday night in the Salem Church. 

The third was on Sunday, and was called Provincial Day, be- 
cause on this occasion all the ministers and members throughout 
the Province were invited to gather at Salem for appropriate reli- 
gious exercises. 

The fourth occasion was the celebration of the actual day and 
hour of the arrival of the first settlers 150 years ago. 

THE FIRST DAY. 

This was, in some respects, the special day, because the cele- 
bration took place on the historic ground itself. The fears were 
that as it was so late in November the day would be too cold to 
enjoy an outdoor exercise. Hence many hearts were filled with joy 
when Friday, Nov. 13, dawned bright, clear and warm. Arrange- 
ments had been made with the Southern Railway to run a special 
train to and from Bethabara. Three special cars were reserved for 
our company of two hundred, and on the entire train were nearly 
800 passengers. In addition to this company many drove up to 
Bethabara in private conveyances, and from the entire surrounding 
country representatives came, till the historic spot had gathered a 
company of three thousand or more. 

The music was furnished by the church musicians of Salem and 
of Bethania, and as these strong, fine bands played the grand old 
chorals in the open air, the effect was inspiring. 

The morning exercise was conducted by Bishop Rondthaler, 
and included the unveiling of the large granite memorial, dedicated 
to the surveying party of 1752, and to the twelve men who made up 
the party of first settlers in 1753. A very fine photograph of this 
part of the day's ceremony was secured by Mr. Leslie and will be a 
permanent souvenir of the occasion. 

Then an hour was devoted to the necessary ministration to the 
physical nature, and a picturesque scene it was, as on hillside and in 
meadow the groups were gathered for the noon-day luncheon. The 
school team had brought up sandwiches and pickles, cakes and 
fruit, and full justice was done by the young ladies. All were happy 
and all were well cared for. 

At two o' clock the strains of music called the company together 



The Academy. 2553 

at the spot where stood the first house. A large granite block had 
been placed in position at this place, and on this was fastened an 
iron tablet telling the story of the first hut. Gathered in a large 
hollow square the people listened attentively to the paper read by 
the Rev. C. D. Crouch. 

In orderly procession the company passed to the site of the old 
stockade fort which had protected these men from the Indians in the 
French and Indian war, and this spot was marked by a peculiar 
monument. In addition to the stone pillars indicating the outlines 
of the fort, one of the original millstones was placed in an upright 
position, on a granite base, and on this is fastened a plate with 
an appropriate inscription. On this stone Mr. B. J. Pfohl' stood as 
he read an account of the fort and the mill in times of peace and of 
war, in the French and Indian war and the v/ar of the American 
Revolution. 

At the close of this second part of the afternoon's exercises, the 
great procession moved solemnly up the hillside to the graveyard, 
and gathered on this sacred spot, with the sighing pines all around, 
with the evening sun making its way slowly down the western sky, 
and with the graves of the early heroes all about them. Rev. Ed- 
ward Crosland read the story of how in triumphant faith these great 
men and women sealed their good works in the noble death they 
died. As the voice of the preacher rang out in the solemn stillness 
an impression was made which will not pass from the memory. 

Just as the sun passed beneath the horizon the sound of the 
special train was heard and all were reminded that the events which 
had engaged our attention were events of the long distant past ; and 
though all day the fact of the attack of British soldiers and cruel red 
men seemed to be singularly near and real, now that the engine on 
the Southern came puffing along, with rumbling of wheels and clang- 
ing of bell, we realized that we were in the year 1903, not in 1803, 
still less in 1753. 

Dinner was awaiting the school as all entered the halls of old 
Alma Mater, and it was the unanimous decision that a more enjoy- 
able day had seldom fallen to the lot of the school. It is proper to 
add that in point of enjoyment, numbers, inspiration and general 
enthusiasm, it is probable that Bethabara day, Nov. 13, 1903, will 
go down in history as one of the most successful celebrations in the 
century and a half of the. history of the Province. 



2554 The Academy 

second day. 

Saturday evening was the date of the meeting of the Wachovia 
Historical Society. The speakers were Rev. Paul de Schweinitz, of 
Bethlehem, Penn. , and the Hon. C. B. Watson, of Winston, N. C. 
In addition to these addresses papers were read which had been pre- 
pared by Mr. C. T. Pfohl and Mr. W. S. Pfohl, and the Sesqui- 
Centennial ode was read by Miss Lehman. The music on this 
occasion was fine and the interest good, and in addition to the pleas- 
ures of the evening one good work was the decision of the Society 
to purchase the site of the original hut at Bethabara, and to improve 
the ground so that it will serve as a small park to accommodate 
the visitors of the future to historic Bethabara. 

On this occasion special attention was called to the handsome 
medals which had been prepared to commemorate the occasion. 
The price is small, (25 cents) and the work very fine. The Acad- 
emy will be glad to furnish any of its readers with these medals, 
delivered at the price named above. 

third day. 

The Provincial Day, Sunday, Nov. 15th, was also one blessed 
with beautiful weather. On this day the members and friends gath- 
ered from town and neighborhood, and from the festal service, at 
10 a. m., till the close of the exercises at 5 o'clock in the afternoon, 
the greatest interest was abroad. It was a day long to be remem- 
bered. The festal sermon was preached by Rev. Paul de Schweinitz, 
and Bishop Rondthaler presided at the various services. Rev. 
James E. Hall delivered the address at 10 a. m. All of the pupils 
of the school attended the lovefeast, and very many who are church 
members remained to celebrate the Holy Communion. When the 
day closed it was apparent to all that it was another successful day 
in the series of festal days. 

FOURTH DAY. 

Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1753, at 3 p. m. , the first settlers arrived 
in Wachovia, at the present site of Bethabara. It was proposed to 
make this hour one of praise and prayer. All the churches in the 
Province were to be opened, and, in case it was impossible to attend 
the church service, it was suggested that it would be well to pass 



The Academy. 2555 

that partic .ilar hour as a" silent hour, ' ' spent in meditation and 
prayer. Unfortunately the weather was not as it had been on the 
previous days. Bright and warm sunshine had favored the celebra- 
days, but on Nov. 17th the rain came down in torrents, and in the 
country at least it was almost impossible to gather in the churches. 
The celebration as a whole was a marked success, one which 
was interesting because of the rich historical associations and one 
which was spiritually uplifting, because the results of the works and 
prayers of the heroes of early days were apparent to all who studied 
the lessons of the celebration ; and to one and all was evident the 
truth of that Scripture which says, ' ' Blessed is the nation whose 
God is the Lord." 



HISTORICAL ITEMS. 
1889— 1892. 



Five pupils spent the summer vacation in the Academy, 1889. 

Trip to Carolina Beach by vacation girls. July, 1889. 

Mr. Clewell visited the Southern States, but returned homesick, 
and spent the summer as an invalid. 1889. 

A number of the teachers visited Europe. July and August, 
1889. 

Mr. C. B. Pfohl accepted position of Secretary of Salem Female 
Academy. August, 1889. 

Post Graduate Course, with the degree of A. B. , opened with 
a class of nine members. September, 1889. 

Linoleum placed on floor of Main Hall. September 8, 1889. 

Chapel temporarily used as a dormitory ; morning prayers 
conducted in Moravian church. 1889. 

Another room company opened with study-parlor in north-east 
room, 1st floor, Main Hall. September, 1889. 

Owing to the large attendance several pupils moved to the 
Principal's house., September, 1889. 

The silver plates, " North Senior" and South Senior," placed 
on the doors. October, 1889. 

The Academy enlarged to 12 pages. November, 1889. 

Work on the new Gymnasium commenced. November, 1889. 

Seniors made a trip to Old Town. November, 1889. 

Students' tour to Northern cities. October 28 — November 9, 
1889. 



2556 The Academy. 

A large number of new books added to the Library. October, 
1889. 

Covered walk between Annex and Main Halls finished. De- 
cember, 1889. 

Gertrude Jenkins accepted position as stenographer in Princi- 
pal's office, in place of Eliza Clark, resigned. December, 1889. 

Winter Evening Course of Entertainments commenced. Pro- 
ceeds for benefit of Salem Orchestra and Salem Philharmonic So- 
ciety. January, 1890. 

Another large list of books added to the Library. February, 
1890. 

Hesperian Society received piano. March, 1890. 

Work on Electric Street Car lines commenced. April, 1890. 

Granite curbing and other improvements in Salem Square. 
April, 1890. 

Fountain presented to Academy by Bishop Rondthaler. May, 
1890. 

Fire in South Hall, 4th story ; extinguished by Sallie McLean. 
May, 1890. 

Society Banquet. May 15, 1890. 

Post Graduates' reception to Seniors ; reading of ' ' Posteid, ' ' 
etc. May 23, 1890. 

Commencement, May 30, — June 3d. 1890. Sermon by Rev. 
Mr. Byrd, of Fayetteville, N. C. Oration by Hon. G. W. San- 
derlin, of N. C. Graduates, 37. Electric design, " S. F. A., 90," 
used in church. 

Electric lights used in school first time. May, 1890. 

Death of Mrs. Landstreet (Belle Patterson), who presided over 
the White House during the administration of Andrew Johnson. 
July, 1891. 

Death of Mrs. James K. Polk. August, 1891. 

N. C. Press Convention entertained in Academy. August. 

^y an oversight one school year was omitted. The items will appear next month.) 

Souvenir spoons placed on the market by W. T. Vogler & 
Son. September, 1891. 

Alumnae Fund reached 8500. September, 1891. 

Miss Matthewson entered upon her duties in the Vocal Depart- 
ment. September, 1891. 



The Academy. 2557 

Upper story of Main Hall converted intd Senior dormitory. 
September, 1891. 

Chapel regained for purposes of worship, concerts, etc. Sep- 
tember, 1891. 

Dr. George T. Winston inaugurated as President of the Uni- 
versity of N. C. Mr. Clewell present and took part. 

Seniors' picnic at Old Town. Nov. 11, 1891. 

Unsuccessful effort made to abolish the Salem Post Office. 
October, 1891. 

Educational tour to New York, Philadelphia, Washington and 
other Northern cities. November, 1891. 

Prof. Markgraff stricken with paralysis, October, 1891, and 
sailed for Germany, December 5, 1891. 

Seniors' caps and gowns arrived. Nov. 22, 1891. 

Prof. Schmolk entered upon his duties as Professor of Music. 
December, 1891. 

Hot water heating system placed in Annex and Park Halls. 
December, 1891. 

Miss Scriber entered upon her duties as instructor in elocution. 
January, 1892. 

Special room for book-keeping pupils in wing of Main Hall. 
Hall. January, 1892. 

Walking club organized. February, 1892. 

Remains of Rev. Lewis Rights brought to North Carolina from 
Indian Territory and buried at Kernersville. February 1892. 

Death of Corrie Jones in the Academy. February, 1892. 

Mid-winter Concert. February 19, 1892. 

Celebration in the Moravian Church, commemorating the 300th 
anniversary of the birth of John Amos Comenius. February, 1892. 

Public calisthenic drill. April, 1892. 

Library circle organized. April, 1892. 

Mrs. Frank Leslie visited the Academy. April, 1892. 

Kuri Cottage, at Carolina Beach, rented for the summer. 
April, 1892. 

Dr. William Hall, of New York, lectured in Academy Chapel. 
April 12 and 13, 1892. 

The People' s Press and printing business of L. V. & E. T. 
Blum sold to Crist & Keehln. May 1892. 



2558 The Academy. 

Dr. Hume, of University of North Carolina, lectured in Acad- 
emy Chapel. April 23, 1892. 

Hesperian Entertainment. April 22, 1892. 

Reception tendered Faculty, and, later, Senior and Junior 
Classes at Principal's house. Spring, 1892. 

Commencement, May 21 — 25, 1892. Baccalaureate Sermon 
by Rev. W. W. Moore, D. D. ; Oration by President George T. 
Winston, L.L.D. 

June edition of The Academy 12,000 copies. 

Anna L. Ogburn collection for Museum received. May, 1892. 

Another room added to Library, at the north side. June, 1892. 

Alumnae Fund has reached $1,000. June, 1892. 



Life of Governor William Tryon. 



E. A. LEHMAN. 



It is gratifying to note that our people are awakening to the 
importance of writing up North Carolina history. We have a his- 
tory to be proud of, and yet very few beyond the limits of our own 
State know anything about it. If New England had had the story 
of the first settlement on Roanoke Island, the knightly figure of Sir 
Walter Raleigh to glorify not only ' ' the spacious times of great 
Elizabeth," — but our own times, the first Declaration of Independ- 
ence, an Edenton Tea Party, the first battle of Revolutionary ten- 
dencies, — a Flora Macdonald, and others as noted, the whole world 
would have been notified of the facts in song and story ; but we said 
nothing about them, and, of course, others did not. We had a his- 
toric " Dachstein," as famous in its way as Plymouth Rock, but in- 
stead of making much of it, putting an ornamental fence around it, we 
blasted it up into fragments to build a mill-dam ! We trust this Rip 
Van Winkle sleeping-time is over, and a new spirit of patriotic 
devotion to our State has begun to prevail. 

Dr. Clewell's " History of Wachovia," has had a wonderful 
influence in this section, and the great and enthusiastic success of 
our late Sesqui-Centennial is largely owing to the interest previously 
excited by his book. 



The Academy. 2559 

Recently, we have met with another valuable and interesting 
work by Marshall De Lancy Haywood, of Raleigh, entitled ' ' Gen. 
Vym- Tryon : his administration in the Province of N. C. , 1765-1771. 
His services in a civil capacity and military career, as Commander- 
in-Chief of Colonial Forces, which suppressed the Insurrection of 
the Regulators." The book is handsomely gotten up, bound in 
green cloth, written in a style at once clear, concise and interesting, 
especially because it gives the true, the real life of ' ' the worst mis- 
represented man in our history." 

The frontispiece has a fine picture of the Tryon Palace at New- 
bern, a beautifully executed engraving of what was, at that time, the 
most elegant structure in America, though it was destroyed by fire 
in less than twenty years after it was built. Among the other hand- 
some illustrations are the ruins of St. Philip's church, Brunswick, 
N. C. , a map of the battleground of Alamance, the tomb of Tryon 
at Twickenham, England, very near to that of Alexander Pope, the 
great poet of England's Augustan Age. There is also Tryon' s Sig- 
net and Armorial Seal ; by the way, the original Seal is one of our 
most valued treasures in the Wachovia Historical Society. 

The book fills a long felt want in our early Colonial history, 
and is dedicated to the ' ' Memory of the Revolutionary Patriots of 
North Carolina, who learned a valuable lesson in the art of war 
while fighting under Tryon at Alamance, in 1771, and afterwards 
made use of this knowledge in a way not to his liking. ' ' In read- 
ing this work we are surprised to find that when Tryon left North 
Carolina to become Governor of New York, it was, strange to say, 
rather a coming down for him, for North Carolina was then a more 
populous colony than New York, numbering 393,751, while the 
population of New York was 340,120 ; the governor's salary, too, 
was larger in N. C. , and the Palace at Newbern the handsomest 
structure in America. 

Another feature of interest to us lies in the fact that Hay- 
wood quotes largely from Dr. Clewell's History of Wachovia, 
and thus places our Church records on a level with other undoubted, 
authentic sources of historic truth, such as Colonial Records of North 
Carolina, Lossing' s Field Book of the Revolution, Martin's, Car- 
uther's and other works. 

We owe much to our fathers' exact, painstaking diaries of the 



2560 The Academy. 

occurrences of stirring- times, such as Governor Tryon's celebration 
of King George's birthday at Bethabara, the Regulators, the Revo- 
lutionary troubles ; somehow nearly every notable event touched 
our settlements, and sometimes very heavily too, and these plain, 
simple, truthful statements become more and more valuable as the 
years roll on. 

We hope that Mr. Haywood's admirable work will encourage 
others to go and do likewise. We have abundant material for his- 
torian, poet and novelist. 



— Thanksgiving Day was heartily enjoyed. The splendid ser- 
vice in the morning — with sermon by Bishop Rondthaler, fine 
decorations and happy singing made this again a marked day among 
the Academy's holiday observances. Afterwards there was the 
turkey dinner, with all of the other good things that an Academy 
Thanksgiving feast stands for. 

— The Vesper Service of Sunday, Dec. 6, was specially inter- 
esting. Bishop Rondthaler and Dr. Clewell both took part, 
and some twenty young gentlemen from the Men's League were 
present. The singing was unusually bright and inspiring. 



ifl&atrietj 



Brooks — Cramer. — On November n, 1903, at the M. E. Church in 
Thomasville, N. C , Mr. Bernard Alexander Brooks to Miss Nellie 
Brown Cramer. 

Brown— Conner. -In the First Baptist Church of Tuskegee, Ala., on 
November 11, 1903, Mr Love Johnson Brown to Miss Bessie Lee 
Conner. 

Gorrell — Shelton. — On December 9, 1903, in the Home Moravian 
Church, Sa'em, N. C, Mr Peter A. Gorrell to Miss Bertha Isabelle 
Shelton, both ot Winston -Salem, N. C. 

Smith— Creasy. — On November 15, 1903, in Mt. Airy, N. C, Mr. Sam- 
uel Lee Smith to Miss Minnie Isabella Creasv. 

Efird— Rights. — On November 25, 1903, in ihe First Baptist Church 
of Winston-Salem, N. C, Dr. Lester Efird to Miss Georgia Rights. 



THE EUTERPEAN 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpean Society. 

EDITORIAL STAFF : 

Agnes Belle Goldsby, '04— Editor-in-Chief. 
Mary B. Gudger, '04, ) •■ . . . t?ai<,~ „ 
Frances Powers. '04, \ Assistant Edltors - 
Helen M. Blandford, '05— Literary Editor. 
Carrie Levy, '06 — Exchange Editor. 
Corinne Baskin, '04 — Business Manager. 

Christmas Carol. 



A. B G. 



NATURE. 

Wrapt in her mantle of purest white, 

Her brow encircled with celestial light, 

Innocent and lowly the maiden earth 

Awaits news of her Saviour's birth. 

Hark ! from the heavens comes a joyous refrain, 

A beautiful, melodious, marvellous strain ! 

It rings through the air calm and still — 

' ' Peace on earth, toward men good will. ' ' 

MAN. 

Weary mortal, in garb of guilt arrayed, 
With haggard look and mantle frayed ; 
Oppressed with sin, shame and sorrow, 
Little dreams the golden morrow 
Will bring him joy, ease his pain — 
But list ! He hears the wondrous strain. 
His heart beats light, his pulses thrill ! 
" Peace on earth, toward men good will. 

ENVOI. 

So sinful mortal and sinless earth 
Together hail their Saviour's birth. 
Angel, man and nature raise 
Their triune voice of holy praise, 
Thus they swell the heavenly strain, 
While echo repeats the glad refrain. 
Down through the ages we hear it still — 
Peace on earth, toward men good will." 



2562 The Euterpean. 

Holly and Mistletoe. 



B. G. 



A peep into almost any house decorated for the joyous Yule- 
tide would reveal the bright red holly berries peering out from their 
stiff, green leaves behind some old family portrait or above the 
mantel-shelf, and the branch of mistletoe suspended from the lus- 
trous chandelier, or, mayhap half hidden by the heavy draperies of 
some secluded doorway, into which sequestered spot the shyest of 
blue-eyed maidens might be beguiled ' ' just once ' ' by her ardent 
cavalier, and there requested to pay the penalty of being caught 
beneath the mistletoe — and all the world knows what that is ? 

In " gai Paris " during the Christmas season, the French peas- 
ant decked in his flannel blouse, with a warm muffler of startling 
hue wrapped securely about his throat, trundles his cart-load of ever- 
greens up and down the streets and sells, for a sou or two, bunch 
after bunch of his verdant wares. The flower girls, with their 
baskets piled high, sing the praises of > " houx ' ' and ' ' gui ' ' in 
tones shrill but melodious. Indeed, several provinces of sunny 
France gain a goodly revenue by these sales. 

"In the good old days of long ago ' ' the devout people of 
Catholic countries made their altar candles from the pearl- like 
globes of the mistletoe. Before this time even it was one of the 
Druid's most sacred emblems. The priestesses, in their flowing 
robes, bore aloft boughs of mistletoe in their solemn processions 
through the great forest cathedrals and placed them upon the grim 
sacrificial altars of stone. 

The mistletoe which grows on the oak was held in high esteem 
by the Celts because of the magical virtues which it was supposed 
to possess. 

' ' The name holly is said to be derived from the use of branches 
and berries to decorate the churches at Christmas, from which the 
tree was called ' Holy Tree. ' ' ' 

The custom of employing holly and other plants for decorative 
purposes has come down to us through the ages, and is supposed 
to be the survival of the uses of the Roman Saturnalia or of the old 
Teutonic practice of ornamenting the interior of dwellings with ever- 
greens where the woodland elves and fairies might find shelter from 
the chill winds and icy snowflakes of winter. 



The Euterpean. 2563 

In Germany a bit of consecrated holly was hung over the door- 
way as a protection against thunder. The legend goes that in Der- 
byshire according as the holly was rough or smooth the husband or 
wife would rule supreme in the domestic domain. Then, too, the 
superstitious English matron is careful to preserve a sprig of holly 
which has been used in the church, because she firmly believes that 
it will bring good luck to her and her household during the entire 
year. 

The freshness of holly and mistletoe is enduring, and they have 
been well chosen to add beauty to this great festal season for 
' ' Christmas-tide keeps memory green. ' ' 



Radium. 



H. M. B 



For years a lumpy, reddish powder, regarded as worthless, 
was left to accumulate in heaps, tons of it being carted away by any 
one who so desired. Now this same refuse contains the rarest and 
most precious of the seventy-odd known elements that compose our 
earth. It is like our common salt in appearance. In the whole 
world not more than four grammes, or a good tablespoonful, has 
been obtained and purified. The scarcity and costliness of this 
element is so great that it is worth three thousand times its weight 
in gold. 

M. and Mme. Curie are responsible for this great discovery 
and in it there are many other discoveries. Mme. Curie did as much 
toward discovering Radium as her husband, and even though she was 
a poor Polish student in the Latin quarter of Paris, her talents are 
rare. The properties of Radium are great, but its greatest property 
is that of rendering the air about it a better conductor of electricity. 
It gives great light and heat ; is an inexhaustible source of energy ; 
destroys or stimulates life, and it is thought that it even creates life, 
and, by destroying the bacteria may heal diseases. In fact, it has 
been used in one of the Parisian hospitals and the terrible ' ' Lupus' ' 
has been cured. The metal uranium, having properties similar to 
radium, is the unit chosen for a measuring instrument. A number 
of wonderful experiments have been performed with the new element, 
and in this way many things have been found out concerning it. 



2564 The Euterpean. 

It changes the color of phosphorus from yellow to red, and also 
increases the production of ozone. In certain cases a small quantity 
of radium, dissolved in water, throws off hydrogen constantly. A 
solution of radium gives a violet or brownish tint to a glass vessel 
containing it. It offers a ready means for distinguishing real dia- 
monds from imitation, causing the true stones to cast forth a bril- 
liant phosphorescent light when placed in a darkened room. 

The manufactory of M. and Mme. Curie is just outside of Paris, 
and, owing to the very small quantity of radium, they themselves 
do all the experimenting. A number of lectures have been given 
by M. Curie on this interesting subject, and of the several recent 
discoveries the one concerning Radium will doubtless prove the 
most valuable. 



Last month, when the November wind blew cold, 

A strange thing happened, so I'm told ; 

Two marks were blown from one quotation 

And beside the wrong verse took their station ; 

They blew right through the troubles of Russia and Japan 

Till they rested on the last page of The Euterpean. 

a. B. G. 



iExcljange department. 

C. L . '06 

— The October Red and White is one of the best exchanges 
that we have received. "In Longing Remembrance" is a very 
good article. 

— The Hall Boy has an interesting story, entitled "My First 
Adventure in the West. 

— The Taylor Literary is a very neat magazine, and contains 
some well-written stories. 

— We hope that by the next issue we will be able to addjmany 
more exchanges to our list. 

— While Thanksgiving has its foundation on Plymouth Rock, 
Christmas resis on the Rock of Ages. — Charles Dudley Warner. 



The Euterpean. 2565 

Societp Notes antr florals. 



M. B. G AND F. P. 



Owing to the fact that our mss. were sent to the printing 
office before the thirty-first of last month, we were unable to men- 
tion the delightful reception which the Fourth Room girls gave to a 
few of their friends, on Halloween afternoon. 

Their room was made very attractive by the tasteful decoration 
of autumn leaves, and was brilliantly illumined by red lights. 

Delicious refreshments were served, and we all left feeling that 
we had indeed spent a very enjoyable hour. 



Miss Elizabeth Jeffries Bowden, owing to her prolonged 
illness, resigned her position as chaplain of our Society on the twen- 
tieth of November. We learned with much regret of her resig- 
nation. 



November twenty -seventh being " election day," no program 
was prepared for that evening. The following officers were chosen : 
President — Mary B. Gtjdger. 
Vice President— Frances Powers. 
Secretary — Agnes Belle Goldsby. 
Critic — Lila Little. 
Chaplain — Lita Young. 
Treasurer — Corinne Baskin. 
Librarian — Emma Greider. 



— Miss Nellie Clark, a former member of our Society, spent 
several days in the Academy recently. Her old friends were glad 
to see her again. 

— Miss Marie Reynolds and Miss Cammie Lindley spent 
Thanksgiving in Greensboro. 

— Mrs. Myers, of Jacksonville, Fla. , came to Salem during the 
the latter part of November and was heartily welcomed by her 
daughter, Dorothy. 

' — Misses Luda and Mae Morrison went to their home in 
Statesville for the Thanksgiving season. 



2566 The Euterpean. 

— Miss Ora Lee, from the State Normal, spent a day in the 
school last month. She was the guest of Miss Laura Hairston. 

— Miss Leonora Johnston had a delightful trip to Wilming- 
ton, where she visited her brother. 

Miss Carrie Price returned home for the twenty-sixth of 
November. She had a fine time in Reidsville. 

— Miss Helen Blandford's mother, brother and two sisters 
arrived in Salem recently. They have decided to remain here all 
winter. 

joints anir liointtas. 



— A painter who fell off a scaffold, with a paint pot in each 
hand, said : 

"Well, I came down with flying colors, anyhow." 

— People think it was wonderful that Lot's wife was turned to 
salt, yet in our times people turn to rubber. 

— "Moses keeps the keys of heaven," so one of our Seniors 
remarked. 

— " Tales of the woolly West are usually yarns. 

— " Papa," said little Tommy Taddells, " what is the game of 
authors ?' ' 

"The game of authors, Tommy," said Mr. Taddells, "is to 
sell their books." 

— " Little things tell — children, for instance. 

— Nervous passenger (during a gale) : " Shall I be drowned?" 
Irascible skipper : "I'm afraid not, mum." 

— Clerk : ' ' What kind of a hammock do you wish ?' ' 
Summer Girl : It need not be double size, but it must be double 

strength. ' ' 

— Ted : ' ' What is that actress doing in this wilderness ?' ' 
Ned : ' ' Trying to find the fellow who wrote the advertisements 

of this summer resort, so that she can engage him as her press 

agent. ' ' 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Florence Moorman — Editor-in-chief. 
Cammie Lindley— Assistant Editor. 
Ora Hunter — Literary Editor. 
Brietz Thom — Exchange Editor. 
Rusha Sherrod — Business Manager. 



lEtrtatai department. 



Quizes ! ! ! 



F. M., '05 



The days of quizes now have come, 
The saddest time of all, 
For some will pass, while all will not, 
And some will ' ' flunk ' ' and fall ! 

We study, study, study hard, 
Each morning, night and noon, 
Until we think we know it all 
Alas ! we'll prove (?) it soon. 

And when the " day of reckoning comes," 
We will not fear to lose 
Let no one think that we 1 re afraid 
Though quaking in our shoes ! 

But when the marks are read, ah, me ! 

Then thaf s the time to fear, 

" I've flunked ! I've flunked ! I've flunked aq;ain ! ! 

The same class for next year !" 



2568 The Hesperian. 

Niagara Falls. 



F. M. , '05. 



Who has not heard of this peerless cataract, which is among 
waterfalls what the Himalayas are among mountain ranges, not only 
the grandest but so greatly pre-eminent as to be without rivalry ? 

The essential quality of Niagara is its sublimity. Other falls 
are dashed from more stupendous heights, and lost amid rocky 
chasms of wilder and more savage formation. But none of them 
can even approach this cataract in that first essential of magnificence. 
Nor can we be greatly surprised, when we consider that over the 
limestone ledge at this point, the accumulated waters of four vast 
inland seas hurl themselves madly on their way to the ocean. 

At present, the height is, on the American side, one hundred 
and fifty-four feet, and on the Canadian, one hundred and forty-five. 
There are many waterfalls whose height is greater than this, but it 
frequently happens that the volume of water over such descents is 
very small, as is the case with the "Bridal Veil Fall" in the Yosemite 
Valley. That, however, has advantages of the most striking char- 
acter in its surroundings. Niagara has nothing. All that it boasts 
of the sublime and beautiful is contained within the rock-walls of its 
own chasm. All of its approaches are plain, dull and tedious. The 
country around is almost absolutely flat. There are no forests and 
but few fine trees. The villages that now crowd about its vicinity 
have no recommendations on the score of taste, and though the 
numbers that visit this great natural curiosity have made hotels 
necessary, it has never been thought worth while to surround them 
with gardens. Niagara, it must be confessed, resembles a superb 
diamond set in lead. The stone is perfect but the setting is lament- 
ably destitute of beauty. 

The "Table Rock," on the Canadian side is probably the best 
point of view for the ordinary spectator, though for the artist there 
are several other spots which bring into prominence various inter- 
esting features. Here, at the "Table Rock," is a rustic seat, ar- 
ranged for the accommodation of visitors, who from this point can 
take in at one glance the whole of the Falls. Immediately in front 
of them is the " Horseshoe Fall," where, from the extreme depth 



The Hesperian. 2569 

of the channel, the water has a deep emerald tinge of exquisite 
beauty. Next to it is Goat Island, with which, by bridges of frail 
aspect, is connected, on the right hand, Terrapin Tower, and, on 
the left, Luna Island. Beyond Luna Island stretches the American 
Fall. 

More than a mile below the Falls is the noted Whirlpool, with 
its rapids. Here the water fairly hisses as it undulates, seethes and 
boils. The waves seem to have a life of their own and to be ani- 
mated with human passions. At the points where the whirlpools 
are the scene is fairly terrific. Current opposes current, wave 
fights wave with hideous uproar. 

Some visitors think that the Niagara Falls are more beautiful 
in winter than in summer, but it must be remembered that if winter 
gives much it also takes away much. If it covers the trees and the 
grass with diamonds, and heaps up ice-serpents, and builds colon- 
nades and spires and obelisks, it takes away a great part of the vol- 
ume of the water. 

Those who care for color and light and majesty of sound will 
do well to come in the summer ; those who like the strange, the 
fantastic and the fearful must come in the winter. But the true 
lover of the picturesque in nature will come at both times. Each 
has its special charm ; each has some things which the other lacks ; 
but in both are features of transcendent beauty. 



— By a recent experiment it has been found that potassium 
iodide (K. I.) unites with sulphur (S) (under pressure) with the 
following reaction : 

K I x 2. S— KISS. 

Care should be taken to perform this experiment in the dark, as 
some of the material is explosive and the reaction is very violent. — 
Exchange. 



— Brilliant Senior of '04: "Oh, yes. deliquescence means 
when a tree gives out moisture, and excurrent when it takes in 
moisture. ' ' 



2570 The Hesperian. 

Societg incites anft ILocate. 



CAMMIE LINDLEY. 



— Among the many pleasant evenings that we have spent to- 
gether in society, a ' ' voting contest ' ' stands to the front as being 
especially interesting. Great was the merriment when ' ' our presi- 
dent ' ' announced that we would vote for ' ' this, that and the other 
girl. ' ' Of course, it was understood from the beginning that the 
whole was only a bit of fun, and if, by chance, the cap should fit 
the young lady's head it would only be a huge joke. The accom- 
plishments^) and the accomplished(?) young ladies voted for ran 
as follows : 

Who is the most affected girl in the Hesperian Society ? 

Ans. — Maidai Howard. 
What girl talks most ? 

Ans. — Eliza Knox and Mary Cobb. 
What girl talks least ? 

Ans. — Brietz Thom. 
Who giggles most ? 

Ans. — Mary Stewart. 
Who is the most conceited girl ? 

Ans. — Rusha Sherrod and Florence Moorman. 

— The regular election was held on Friday, Nov. 27th, and 
there was no change made in the officers, all of the old ones being 
re-elected. 

— Cammie Lindley spent Thanksgiving at her home in Po- 
mona, N. C. 

— The Wednesday morning private pupils in Art always enjoy, 
to the fullest extent, the dainty lunches given by Miss Siedenburg 
after lessons. 

— Pattie and Pescud Chisman spent Thanksgiving at their 
home in Pine Hall, N. C. 

— We are very glad that Ethel Corbin, who has been ill, is 
again able to be out. 



The Hesperian. 2571 

IBxcfjange 'department. 

Brietz Thom. 



— It is with pleasure that we take our place at the Exchange 
Table, which is full to overflowing with bright and interesting col- 
lege magazines. In this way we come in close contact with our 
fellow students, and can gfve as well as receive. 

— The November number of Davidson College Magazine is 
very good. It contains several specially interesting articles. ' ' An 
Ambition Realized " is a bright and well-written story. The article 
on ' ' Edgar Allen Poe ' ' gives us a very good idea of our great 
American lyrical poet, and shows that he has been well studied. 

— The Criterion is a very good little paper considering its age, 
and, with more experience, its editors will make it quite good. 

— The Crimson is always fresh and bright, with its athletic 
news and the students' witty contributions, though for this reason 
it is necessarily more interesting to the Manual boys than to others. 



— Old G. (introduced on the train) : "May I inquire, Miss 
Brown, where you live ?' ' 

Miss B. : "I have the honor, sir, to reside in — ' ' 
Old G. : "Ah, I see,- Boston." 



No man can do more than his best. But a good many men 
can do more than what they think is their best. 



— It seems that the cold weather does not prevent the girls 
from playing tennis, since the court is usually occupied. Keep it 
up, girls, it's an excellent way to get warm ! 



2572 The Hesperian. 

Uttetarg Jiotes. 



ORA HUNTER. 



In "The Congressman's Wife," John D. Barry has given us 
a strong and thoroughly interesting study of American politics. It 
is one of the strongest and most subtle studies of political and social 
life of New York and Washington. 

— Mr. David Gray, a young journalist of Buffalo, who knows 
horses thoroughly, has given us the benefit of this knowledge in his 
new book, "Gallops 2." If this book is as interesting, fresh and 
witty as his first stories are, it will be a great favorite with those who 
enjoy a quick racy story. 

— Mr. Crawford's latest book, the " Heart of Rome," is a very 
unusual story, full of the best traits of Italian character. Those who 
have read and enjoyed "The Cigarette-Maker's Romance" will 
look forward with pleasure to this new story. 



ISoots of tije Bag. 



Hearts Aflame Louise Winter 

The Master Rogue David G. Phillips 

The Sherrods George B. McCutcheon 

The Red Poocher Seumas McManus 

Falk Joseph Conrad 

The Call of the Wild Jack London 

The Yellow Crayon E. P. Openheim 

The Vulgarians Edgar Fawcett 

A Puritan Witch Marvin Dana 

Fortunes of Fifi M. Elliott Sewell 

The City of the King Mrs. Lew Wallace 



The Academy. 2573 



Special Price till Jan., 1904, $1.50. 

HISTORY OF WACHOVIA 

IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

By Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title- 
Printed by Doubleday , Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 
sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 
will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 
carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

The Charlotte Observer publishes an extended review of the above 
work, concluding with the following lines : 

" A very instructive chapter comes near the close of the volume, giv- 
ing a history of the Moravian Church, or " Unitas Fratrum," as they styled 
themselves. The last chapter gives a sketch of the lives of the eleven 
Principals of Salem Academy and Col ege, from Samuel Kransch, in 1802, 
down to the present incumbant. This chapter is written by Miss Lehman, 

" We are still indebted to Dr. Clewell for giving us the history of this 
unique and interesting people. Whoever has visited o d Salem, and seen 
its unique houses, its shaded groves, its venerable graveyard with recum- 
bent tombstones, its church with its beautiful and impressive ceremony, its 
venerable gr iveyard with recumbent tombstones, its church with its beau- 
tiful and impressive ceremony, its far famed schools, its evidences of thrift 
and sobriety, whoever has seen all these things has wished that he might 
learn more of ihe simple, earnest, Christian people that h^ve builded here 
so well. 

" Dr. Clewell has made judicious use of his sources in writing this his- 
tory, and has told his story in a st aightforward, scholarly manner. He has 
evidently gone th 1 ough with much paient and laborious research in the 
prosecution of his task. The result, a handsomely bound volume in cloth 
and gold, stands very much to his credit, and is a cause for just pride both 
to himself and the people he represents." 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



2574 The Academy. 

James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C., 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy, sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Correspondence solicited- 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream'Puffs, ~) 20 cts. Vanilla Wafers, ~\ 10 cts. 



Crescents, \ per Kisses, > per 

Cup Cakes, j dozen. Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



M ¥@® lot] 



The Academy. 



2575 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment of rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs. Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others tnat h d ve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a stock that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others that will 
please the most exclusive and exacting taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOBOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



2576 The Academy. 

102d YE^lR 



SALGm ACADGIDY 

ADD COLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, IV, C. 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos jComenius, and, throngh the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parents who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ing of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible ior a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have gro*n and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors > 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which will 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



The Academy. 



2577 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogue. 

JAS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



YOU 

WANT 



SHOE 



ALL 

JL JkLJlo 

GO? 



IP 
SO 

SEE 

us 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOIfcTIES- 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy, 



2578 The Academy. 



OUR SPECIALTIES: 

STERLING SILVERWARK 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 



WINSTON-SALRM. N C 

PLUMBEK, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 



The Academy. 2579 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 

I IIP TO 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 

that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 

LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



2580 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 



"When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place vour son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized. Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomely illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, B.L., Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



1793-The Bingham School-I902-Q3 

Located on the Ashtville Plateau since 1891 Milit ,ry . U. S. An'uy Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty Statics represents.! this yean, i om .\!nssaehu?etts uud Dakota 
on the North to Texa- and Florida on elm rioutn 
$125 per hair-term. Address Col. R. Bjxgham, i xi\ t., P st Office, Asheville, N.JO. 



THE ACADEMY. _ 

Vol. 27. Winston-Salem, N. C, January, 1904. No. 234. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



IS tutorial. 



— A happy and blessed New Year to each and every one of 
■our readers ! 



— A number of new pupils have come into the school in the 
boarding' and the day school departments. The Academy extends 
to each one of these young- friends our best wishes for a prosperous 
and successful term. 



—Our new cover is intended to add one more attraction to the 
various improvements of The Academy. The design and cover 
were selected with great care and with an increased expense. If 
this change gives pleasure to our readers our object will have been 
attained, and we hope ii will be the means of cementing our former 
'friends more closely together with the interests of the publication in 
view, and we also trust that it may be the means of adding new 
subscribers to our lists. 



2582 The Academy. 

— The temperature for November and December was below 
the normal, but because it was so dry the cold did not occasion the 
same inconvenience as would otherwise have been the case. 



An unusually large number of pupils visited their homes dur- 
ing the Christmas recess, but as there were about fifty with us the 
company was large enough to find a bounteous amount of pleasure 
in the happy season just closed. 



— We desire to call the attention of all patrons to the so-called 
box rule as it has existed in recent years. Christmas is the only 
time of year when boxes of provisions from home are received 
within the school. Thanksgiving or birthdays are no exceptions. 
Fruit in reasonable quantities and small boxes of candy are permitted 
if sent only occasionally. Any variation from this rule is embarras- 
sing to the school authorities, and places the pupil in the unpleasant 
light of breaking a school rule. We trust that parents will aid us 
in upholding this as well as all the other regulations which are nec- 
essary in the government of a large body of young people. 

— With the beginning of the New Year new zeal and energy 
enters into the work of the School. Threads which have been 
dropped are picked up ; partial failures in the past are turned into 
successes ; by this final effort of the year. The Academy extends 
its best wishes for a successful year to each and every one of the 
four hundred or more who are members of our school family, and 
trusts that nothing save the word l ' success ' ' may be written upon 
the new page which has been turned by Old Father Time, and 
named " 1004." 



— Our community has seldom been filled with more sympa- 
thetic grief than was the case when the death of the Rev. Dr. Cald- 
well was announced on New Year's Day. A man in the prime of 
life, with rare ability, with a genial disposition filled with sunshine, 
Dr. Caldwell was beloved by all who knew him. He had gone to 



The Academy. 2583 

Philadelphia for an operation, but his friends anticipated no serious 
results, hence the news of his departure was a shock to every one. 
Seldom has the Academy had a warmer friend than Dr. Caldwell, 
and no where has his unexpected demise called forth more sincere 
sorrow than within the school. 



— Death, the reaper, has called home Mrs. L. M. Fries, a be- 
loved Alumna and a devoted friend of the Academy. Her life was 
filled with the one desire of bringing joy and happiness to others. 
There was no child too small to receive a kindly greeting smile from- 
her, and no one of her large circle of friends ever failed to enjoy a 
sympathetic word in regard to family, business or personal interests. 
Verily, the world is made better by a life of purity and devotion 
such as that which was lived by this departed Alumna, and many 
there are who rise up and call her blessed. 



The Star Course. 



A really charming affair was the recital given by the Schubert 
String Quartet, of Boston. This was the opening number of The 
Academy Star Course, and demonstrated the fine artistic value of 
the series and its worth to our musicians and music-students. 

The quartet is composed of four earnest young men who pro- 
pose to make a specialty of playing recitals for colleges and schools. 
Their program at this recital was well chosen, and their work had 
both delicacy and vigor. The audience gave the closest attention, 
and an additional number was given at the end of the program in 
response to the enthusiastic applause. 

The second recital of the series maintained the high musical 
standard of the first evening and was given by Miss Laeta Hartley, 
of Petersburg, Pianist, and Miss Glenn Priest, of Boston, Violinist. 

These ladies gave a delightful recital. Miss Priest has good 
tone, a technic ready for large demands and her temperament 
assures one of an interpretation that holds the interest from the 
cantabile passages of a lullaby to the dramatic climaxes of Vieux- 
temps Appasionata. Miss Hartley has a beautiful singing tone., 



2584 The Academy. 

works up her climaxes without anticipating and has remarkable 
repose for so young a pianist. 

The third number of the series will be the Organ Recital, by- 
Mr. J. Fred Wolle, of Bethlehem, Pa., on Thursday night, Jan- 
uary fourteenth. 



CHRISTMAS. 



The happy Christmas season has come and gone, and we find 
ourselves again in the busy push and drive of a new term. Many 
of the pupils returned to their homes this year, but many remained 
in the school, and we have no doubt but that those who went home 
enjoyed their trip, and we know that those who remained had a 
good time. 

After the close of recitations a day or two were employed in 
finishing the many little tokens of affection which were to add to 
the already overcrowded mails, or were to remain in the school to 
give pleasure to companions or teachers. 

Then came the busy time of decorating. This is always a mys- 
terious time. The rooms are usually kept closed till the happy 
Christmas Eve arrives, and then there is a pleasant rivalry to see 
who has .succeeded in making the most attractive decoration. It 
usually seems that the prize is won by each room, since every one 
is so happy at that time that if a committee were appointed to de- 
cide we are "sure that the Committee would award the medal to each 
and every room. 

Christmas Eve was a veritable Santa Claus. Mysterious pack- 
ages and boxes were being secretly placed here and there for sur- 
prises. The manv boxes from home had contributed their share to 
the store of good and beautiful things. Pupils were busy, teachers 
were busy, and it was long after midnight before the house was left 
to the silence which was broken only by the tread of the night- 
watchman. 

Before the first streaks of the dawn were showing in the East 
there was a stir perceptible in the buildings, and shadowy forms 
were seen here and there, too anxious to inspect the tables to remain 
longer at rest. Soon the buildings were alive with excitement, and 
all knew that Christmas, happy Christmas, was here. 



nr. Acaof.Siv 2535 

How the very air breathed the spirit of the happy season ! The 
evergreens were so fresh and fragrant. The tables were loaded 
with so many beautiful and attractive presents. The surprises were 
so genuine. The variety of gifts represented the tastes of a hundred 
homes from New England to Texas. It was a happy time, a time 
in which good will mingled with mirth and exuberance of spirits. 

At church time all repaired to the elaborately decorated sanc- 
tuary, and there worshipped the Giver of all this joy. The Christ- 
mas services throughout are one of the great attractions of a Christ- 
mas at Salem. Certain it is that the decorations cannot be surpassed, 
the music cannot be sweeter and the Christmas joy more abundant 
than is the case in the old Home church in Salem. 

The Christmas dinner was, as usual, a great success. It might 
appear that the numerous boxes would make this function only a 
partial success. But any one who would count the number of beau- 
tifully browned turkeys, and the number of rich mince pies, which 
are on the tables at the beginning of the meal but are not there at 
the close would be convinced that the home boxes do not interfere 
with the full justice to the Christmas dinner. 

In the afternoon the entire school attended an informal recep- 
tion at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, where the decoration was 
enjoyed, and the Christmas celebration from the standpoint of the 
little children of the family was shared by the visitors. 

The week between Christmas and New Year was passed rather 
quietly. Late breakfasts, box-room meals, walks about the town, 
and — , well, a good time generally was the program. 

The New Year services were very interesting and impressive, 
especially the midnight service. 

January 1st, 1904, a reception was tendered the faculty and 
pupils at the Principal's house, by Dr. and Mrs. Clewell. The 
reception was from four to eight o'clock, the hostess being assisted 
in receiving by a number of the ladies from the School. 

Thus another happy season has come and gone, and is another 
link which binds one and all to dear old Salem. Sometimes a pupil 
will fret under the stress of class room duties, but that is only for a 
time. When years have gone by and the mind turns back to the 
old school home it is with a feeling of genuine affection, and seasons 
like the one we have just described stand out like elevations in the 
landscape. 



2586 The Academy. 

HISTORICAL ITEMS. 
i8g2 — 1894. 



" The Academy Cottag-e " was open at Carolina Beach, below 
Wilmington. All the teachers who desired to spend a week or 
two at the seaside were made welcome. A number of other friends 
visited the seashore in July and August, 1892. 

Miss Tracy began her work in the Academy as head of the 
Vocal Department. September, 1892. 

Mr. Clewell met with a railroad accident in Mississippi, which 
almost cost him his life. June, 1892. 

Bishop Rondthaler's Jubilee celebrated by the Salem congre- 
gation in a very hearty and happy manner. July, 1892. 

' ' Offices of Worship ' ' introduced into the Chapel Service in- 
stead of the hymn books used in the past. September. 1S92. 

Vice President Stevenson visited the Academy. Sept., 1892. 

Ground glass placed in Library windows. August, 1892. 

Rev. Parmenio Lineback, pastor of the Bethania congregation 
and a Trnstee of our Institution, died at his home. Oct. 10, 1892. 

Dr. Peschau, of Wilmington, lectured in Academy Chapel. 
October, 1892. 

Society Hall occupied with appropriate ceremonies. Novem- 
ber 5, 1892. 

Mr. C. A. Fogle, a very warm friend of the school, died in 
New Mexico. 

Disastrous fires in Winston, including Hotel Zinzendorf. 

Columbus Day observed as a holiday by the school. 

The Wachovia Moravian established. March, 1893. 

Teacher's reception. April, 1893. 

New curtains and furniture placed in Society Halls. Apr. , 1893. 

Electric fire alarm box placed at north corner of Main Hall. 
April, 1893. 

Historical sketch of S. F. A. begun by Miss Adelaide L. Pries. 
May, 1893. 

Concert complimentary to Davis School cadets. May, 1<S ( ,)3. 

Commencement, 1893. Sermon by Rev. A. D. McClure, 
Wilmington, N. C. Oration, Hon. G. W. Shell, Laurens, S. C. 



The Academy. 2587 

The Alumnae Scholarship Fund reached $1,500. May, 1898. 

Senior's Reception. May 19, 1893. 

Prof. L. B. Wurreschke died suddenly, July 8, 1893, in the 
Principal's House. 

Prof. Charles Skilton entered upon his duties as Professor of 
Music. September, 1893. 

Mr. Clarence Thaeler entered upon his duties as book-keeper. 
September, 1893. 

Salem Fire Company 50th Anniversary celebration in Academy 
chapel and dining-room. October, 1893. 

Mr. L. V. Blum died. October, 1893. 

Dr. Rondthaler and Mr. Clewell visited the World's Fair in, 
Chicago. October, 1893. 

Kitchen range enlarged and new oven added. October, 1893. 

The second grand piano purchased for the chapel. November, 
1893. 

The General Endowment Fund started with $4000 placed aside 
by the Provincial Synod. November, 1893. 

Reception tendered a number of friends by the Cooking School. 
January, 1894. 

Dr. Kinyoun lectured in the Laboratory. January, 1894. 

Mid-Winter Concert. January, 1894. 

Rev. Mr. Hark, of Bethlehem, Pa., visited Salem and deliv- 
ered the address before the Young Men's Missionary Society of 
Salem. January, 1894. 

Mr. James Garrity, of Corsicana, Texas, donated $200 to the 
Alumnae Society and $200 for the Emma Moore Memorial Steps. 
February, 1894. 

Society plays, — Hesperian Society, "The Chaperon," Feb- 
ruary 12 and 13. Euterpean Society, February 22 and 23, " Re- 
becca's Triumph." 

Lecture by Hannibal A. Williams. March, 1894. 

Rev. and Mrs. Poiet, missionaries from the West Indies, vis- 
ited Salem. March, 1894. 

"Lily Bell, or the Culprit Fay," under the direction of Miss 
Tracy, given April 5th and 6th, 1894. $117 cleared for Alumnae 
Scholarship Fund. 

Zebulon B. Vance died in Washington. April, 1894. 



2588 The Academy. 

Mr. Clewell lectured in Fayetteville. April, 1894. 

Society Banquet. May 4, 1894. 

Complimentary Concert to Davis Cadets. May, 1894. 

Commencement, 1894. Sermon by Rev. T. H. Pritchard,. 
D. D. Oration by Rev. Robert Strange. Alumnae Address by 
Rev. A. D. Thaeler. 

An edition of 50,000 copies of The Academy printed. June, 
1894. 

Scholarship Fund has reached $2,000. June, 1894. 

Eight pupils remain in the school for the summer. 1894. 

Class of 1894 decided to place a stained glass window in the 
chapel as a memorial to the late Governor Vance. 1894. 

Senior Class numbers 55. September, 1894. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clewell visited Ohio. October, 1894. 

Glee Club organized by Prof. Skilton. November, 1894, 

{Items omitted last number. ) 

Tin roof put on chapel building. September, 1890. 

A number of teachers spent the summer in Europe, among 
them Miss Lehman, Miss Louisa Shaffner, Miss Sallie Shaffner and 
Miss Evans. 

Cooking and Dress-Making Department organized. Septem- 
ber. 1890. 

Linoleum placed in second story of Main Hall. September, 
1890. 

Vacation girls visited the mountains with Mr. C. B. Pfohl as 
escort. Mr. Fogle had charge of the party. 

New plan of closing recitations at two o'clock introduced. 
September, 1890. 

Park Hall moved to its present site. September, 1890. 

Col. F. H. Fries adds $1000 to the Studio Fund, called the 
Louise Fund. October, 1890. 

Sciopticon purchased. October, 1890. 

New bell placed on roof of Main Hall. It weighs about 500 
lbs. October, 1890. 

Student's tour to northern cities. November, 1890. 

Formal reception to the returning student's tour party. No- 
vember, 1890. 



The Academy. 2589 

Autumnal Holiday. November 11, 1890. 

Moravian Synod. November 19, 1890. 

Caps and Gowns introduced in Senior Class. November, 1890. 

Rev. Edward Rondthaler elected to the episcopacy. Novem- 
ber, 1890. 

" Marley's Ghost" read for the first time. December, 1890. 

Rev. H. V. Rominger lectured on Alaska. December, 1890. 

Pupils moved into Park Hall. December, 13, 1890. 

Death of Rev. C. L. Rights, one of our Trustees, on the occa- 
sion of his visit to the Indian Territory. January, 1891. 

Fire in Park Hall ; extinguished by Anderson Smith. January, 
4, 1891. 

Edward Wessels lectured on Jamaica. February, 1891. 

Wm. H. Sherwood gave piano recital. February, 1891. 

New apparatus placed in Gymnasium. March, 1891. 

Memorial service for Rev. C. L. Rights, March 15, 1891, in 
Moravian Home Church. 

Seniors planted Class Tree. April, 1891. 

Miss Evans' evening with comic operas. April, 1891. 

Rev. Edward Rondthaler consecrated Bishop. April, 1891. 

Commencement, May 29 — June 3. Sermon by Rev. H. C. 
Morrison, D. D. , Atlanta, Ga. Oration by Rev. William Henry 
Rice, of New York. Bishop Van Vleck was present as a visitor. 

Banquet of Literary Societies. May, 1891. 



— Mr. G. R. Shultz some days ago brought to the Academy 
two specimens of the smallest turtles which it has been our pleasure 
to inspect thus far. They are not larger than a silver half-dollar, 
but in all respects they are fully developed specimens of the turtle 
family. They are in a small glass dish on the desk of the Principal, 
and the new arrivals seem to be quite at home in viewing the large 
number of visitors who come and go, and even the rattle of the 
type-writers does not disturb their equanimity. 

— Rev. H. E. Rondthaler made a brief visit to his parents just 
after Christmas, and greeted his many frtends in Winston-Salem. 
He filled the pulpit of the Home Church the first Sunday of the 
New Year. 



2590 The Academy. 

A Cordial Letter from a Patron. 



' ' I thought I would write in a few days, thanking you and Mrs. 
Clewell for your hospitality to me during my visit to Julia, but 
" time has not waited " for me. It was quite a pleasure to be with 
you all, and go through the school, noting the various improve- 
ment and comfoi'ts. It took me back to the ' ' June time of my 
life ' ' when I was there at school. I was delighted to meet some of 
my old friends as teachers, and make new acquaintances. The 
girls look healthy and happy. 

' ' My little girl represents the third generation of the Chaffin 
family who have patronized this grand old school, which speaks for 
itself, not only as one of the first schools of North Carolina but of 
the South. I am glad to have my daughter there, and may she be 
an ornament to it in every way is my desire. God bless this school 
and all connected with it. 

" I enjoyed Bishop Rondthaler's sermon on " Secret Sins " 
so much and left the dear old home church feeling spiritually bene- 
fitted. You have a treasure in him. With my best wishes to you 
and Mrs. Clewell, I remain, 

' ' Very sincerely yours, 
"Yadkin College, N. C. "Bella Chaffin Peebles." 



Received for the Alumnae Memorial Hall : 

Receptions on Academy Campus under the direction 

of Mrs. H. E. Fries, Mrs. Ebert, Mrs. Clewell, Miss 

L. C. Shaffner, Mrs. Peterson and others, $111.62 

Mrs. Purdy's entertainment 32.85 

Miss Wolle and pupils of her Cooking Class, from 

sales in the School 28. 15 

St. Cecilia Window 1.00 

Miss Geraldine Dessau 2.00 

Previously acknowledged ^ 9113.41 

09289.03 

Miss L. C. Shaffnfk, Treas. 



The Academy. 2591 

<ff1)roiuclr aitU (Hossip. 

Among the many pleasant occasions of the past weeks was the 
entertainment given by Mrs. Purdy ( Fanny e Rice) in the Academy 
Chapel. Mrs. Purdy was on a visit to her daughter, Edith, and 
brought with her the famous "cabinet." The entertainment was 
divided into two parts, the one consisting of recitations by Mrs. 
Purdy and music by members of the school. The recitations were 
master-pieces, and called forth the most hearty applause. But the 
Cabinet ! That was the attraction. It is difficult to describe to our 
readers the charms of this part of the entertainment. The cabinet 
is brilliantly lighted with numerous electric lights. The little figures 
which act and speak are so arranged that they have the face of the 
presiding genius, Mrs. Purdy herself. The figures were the little 
child who did not like to wear " wubbers ;" the jolly Dutchman; 
the Quaker maid, who was so very modest, but in the end per- 
formed the " ta, ra, ra " with great effect ; then there was the great 
cat ; the little child with the pet under the arm, and the favorite of 
the little family was the great opera singer who could reach any high 
note, even if the neck had to be extended to reach it. Mrs. Purdy 
is an artist of national fame, and hence it may well be imagined that 
she gave each and every number with the finish that only a great 
artist can give to a performance. While the entertainment was in- 
tended primarily as a compliment for the companions of Mrs. 
Purdy' s daughter, she was willing to have the general public ad- 
mitted, with the result that there was a full hall, and as a small 
admission fee was charged a snug sum was realized for the Memo- 
rial Hall. The Academy joins the many other friends in thanking 
Mrs. Purdy for her kindness in giving us this pleasure. 

— The Academy acknowledges the receipt of a complimen- 
tary set of postal cards, giving a beautiful view of the Cedar Ave- 
nue, of a corner of the Salem Square, embracing a view of Main 
Hall, the Church, and a part of the Principal's House, and the third 
card being a typical southern tobacco barn, and a colored man in 
the shelter of the building. These cards were planned by Miss 
Adelaide Fries, who arranged with an artist in Nuremberg, Ger- 
many, to print and color them, and they are without doubt the best 



2592 The Academy. 

piece of work in the line of postal cards which has thus far appeared 
in connection with any American town or city. The art of produc- 
ing really artistic postal cards has reached a point in Germany far 
in advance of the same art in America. Miss Fries went to the 
very center of the held in Germany, and with great care secured 
the best to be had in the field. The result is very gratifying to the 
friends of the school and our section, and Miss Fries should be con- 
gratulated on the success of the effort. Not only are the cards well 
suited as Christmas, or birthday or Easter cards of greeting, but 
they are also delightful to preserve as souvenirs of Winston-Salem. 
As the time for renewing the subscriptions to The Academy is 
here we will make the following suggestion : To every one who 
sends us 60 cents, we will credit the name of the sender one year on 
the subscription books of The Academy and will send postpaid one 
full set of three of the colored postal cards. The retail price without 
postage is live cents for each card. 

—Edith Purdy received a pair of little rabbits from her father 
from distant Florida. They came in a handsome little house, and 
received a warm welcome. But, alas for human hopes ! The little 
guardians of the rabbits desired to clean house recently, and it seems 
that the bunnies were replaced in their house while it was still too 
damp, and the next morning the rabbits were not. A great funeral 
followed, with many mourners and some remarkable music ! 

— Clarence and John Clewell, Jr., left Salem after the Christ- 
mas holidays to pursue their duties in Lehigh University. 

— Miss Thomas has been detained by illness in her home in 
Philadelphia. As we go to press we learn that she is rapidly im- 
proving. 

— Miss Bonney did not get the full enjoyment out of the 
Christmas recess, but her sojourn at the Hospital was ended before 
recitations began, Jan. 4. 

— The bright, crisp weather of the past winter has made the 
daily constitutional walks of the different room companies to be 
taken with great regularity, with a corresponding addition to the 
health and vigor of the girls. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 



This department is devoted to the interests of the Euterpcan Society. 



EDITORIAL STAFF: 

Agnes Belle Goldsby, '04 — Editor-in-Chief. 

Maky B. Gudger, 04, J A . „ ~ ... 
Frances Powers. '04! J Assl ^ 9Ilt Ed " ors - 

Helen M. Blandford, '05— Literary Editor. 

Carrie Levy, '06 — Exchange Editor. 

Corinne Baskin, '04 — Business Manager. 



IE tutorial. 



— Old Father Time has turned over another leaf in his history 
of the world, and before us lies the fresh page of a new year. 
Would that we might only imprint on its spotless surface the golden 
character of noble deeds. 



He kissed her : ' ' Sir ! what do you mean ?' 
She cried. He was far from a fool, 
So he answered : "I was trying,, that's all, 
To follow the Golden Rule." 

She smiled and hung her pretty head, 
He longed to hear her speak. 
" I am a Christian, sir," she said, 
And turned the other cheek. 

— Selected. 



— "Wit, like champagne, is sometimes too aristocratically 
frappe to sparkle. ' ' 



2594 The Euterpean. 

Two Views of Winter. A Sketch. 



A. B G. 



"The good old summer time" was borne away on zephyr's 
wings with the roses ; glorious autumn, with the luscious grape, 
nodding aster and crested goldenrod was frightened off by Decem- 
ber's chill breath, and Dame Nature has already arrayed herself in 
mid-winter garments. The water-nymphs plucked the last pond 
lily long ago, and have sealed their submarine dwellings with a 
tnick coat of ice to keep out the prying wintry blasts. When the 
feathered songster spread his wings then each woodland fairy shook 
her gossamer pinions and flew to warmer climes, and the lazy elf 
wrapt in a tattered brown leaf, crept beneath the straggling un- 
derbrush, and closed his eyes for a long nap. Even the brook's 
merry voice is still, and that rogue, Jack Frost, has silenced the 
noisy waterfall, and changed the tumbling cascade into stiff, spiral 
columns of translucent ice, where the rainbow sprites play at hide 
and seek with the dancing sunbeams. The icicles, the chill winds 
and the falling snow flakes all proclaim that grim Winter is indeed 
here ! 

But while peace and quiet reign undisturbed o'er hill and dale, 
in the bustling city all is noise and confusion for there the cold 
season is the busiest time of the year. Great delivery wagons, 
packed almost to overflowing with bundles and queerly shaped 
parcels, lumber along on the slippery streets ; sleighs, brimful of 
light-hearted lads and rosy-cheeked lassies, glide swiftly over the 
frozen pavement, while the jingle-jangle of the bells rings gaily 
through the frosty air, and throngs of ' ' all sorts and conditions of 
men," most of them fur-clad and muffled to the very eyebrow, 
push, jostle and elbow their way through the multitude as they 
hurry to and fro. 

Winter is a great festive season. The Russian court holds its 
revels in the wonderful ice palace which is annually erected in St. 
Petersburg during the months of January or February. Every 
year Toronto is the scene of much merry-making, when people 
from far and near join the Canadians in their great Ice Carnival. 
Just before Lent, two of our Southern cities, Mobile, the " Mother of 



The Euterpean. 25i)-> 

Mystics, ' ' and New Orleans offer to the world as well as to the 
masqueraders, the very Knights of fun and frolic, all the pleasures 
of Mardi Gras, with its gorgeous pageants and numerous balls. 

So, while the blue-eyed forget-me-not lies sleeping beneath a 
downy covering of snow, man, with ceaseless activity, finds outlet 
for his energies in various social and business transactions, yet — has- 
he found no " winter of discontent?" 



A Miracle. 



H M B 



The pathetic story of Jephthah's daughter, a happy and inno- 
cent girl, going to her sacrifice is repeated, and this time the little 
Princess Elizabeth of Hesse has been sacrificed by the miracle which 
saved the life of the Czar of Russia. To-day the Czar stands strong 
and well, but princes and peasants remember that he lives only 
because a child died in his place. Neither money nor power will be 
spared to bring the murderers to justice. Had it not been for the 
wee maiden, royalty and the people of Russia would to-day be 
without a ruler. 

The child's parents were divorced some time ago, and it was 
agreed that the little girl should spend her time with father and 
mother alternately. The Princess was with her father at Darmstadt,, 
when the Czar invited her father and herself to accompany him to 
Skiernewice, there to enjoy the pleasures of hunting. The Czar 
has been doomed for some time, but, as the mother and populace 
think, the child was taken'into the "lion's cage," and the blow 
aimed at him fell upon the light-hearted maiden of eight years. 

A party from Skiernewice had been hunting, and dinner was 
later than usual, which fact greatly worried the little Princess as her 
appetite was keen, so she chided her uncle because of the delay. 
Oysters, the first course, were served to the Czar, who, according 
to custom, must eat one, at least, before the rest of the company 
partake of the dish. But he was very willing to have his small 
guest take his oysters, little dreaming that enough poison was iru 
them to kill two men. In a few minutes the child turned pale, and 



2596 The Euterpean. 

had it not been for the Czar's strong arm would have fallen from 
the table. Every one understood the cause, as no one tastes food 
at the royal board without a feeling of fear. Medical aid was at 
once summoned, but in a short time Princess Elizabeth was dead. 
Her mother and father were at the funeral, but not a word passed 
between them. Great consternation is felt among the people lest the 
mother, who is Queen Victoria' sgrandaughter should lose her mind. 

Zboticty Xotes anfc Hocals. 

— The bazaar given by the members of the Euterpean Society 
on the afternoon of December the eleventh was a great success. 
Everything was sold, not even the vestige of a turn-over remained. 
Think of that ! The proceeds which amounted to more than thirty 
dollars will be used for the improvement of our Hall. 

— On Friday evening, December eleventh, one of the most 
enjoyable entertainments of the season was given in the Academy 
Chapel. The programme consisted of musical selections for both 
piano and organ, and two delightful recitations by Miss Fannye 
Rice (Mrs. Purdy). Last, but by no means least. Mrs. Purdv 
showed us her wonderful ' ' Cabinet of Dolls. " It is a good thing 
that the chapel roof is securely fastened down, for if this were not 
the case it would surely have fallen during the long and loud ap- 
plause which followed the appearance and disappearance of each 
marionette. The girls were so enthusiastic that Mrs. Purdy was 
kind enough to repeat the performance the next evening for their 
especial and exclusive benefit. 

—One page would be scarcely large enough to contain the 
names of all the girls who went home for the Christmas holidays, so 
we shall not attempt to tell you that " Miss So-aud-so " spent the 
" joyous Yule-tide " ''where the orange blossoms grow," or that 
"Misses X, Y and Z" have returned after a pleasant visit to the 
"balmy North," but deem it sufficient to say that most of the 
wanderer shave again gathered within the protecting walls of their 
school-home and that lessons are going on in the same old way. 



The Euterpean. 2597 

— The members of the Art Class met in the Studio one after- 
noon a day or two before the close of the mid-winter session. Dur- 
ing the last few weeks each girl had painted her monogram on a 
dainty glass as a souvenir of 1903-04. These glasses were handed 
to their various owners by Miss Siedenberg, and then the com- 
pany clustered about the punch bowl, and drank the health of the 
Art Class, and toasted the ' ' model pupil ' ' who was so soon to bid 
them not ate revoir but adiezi. 



lExrijange department. 

C. L., '06. 



— We are glad to have among our exchanges The Vail-Deane 
Budget, The Decaturian, Red and White, The Binghaniite, The 
Hall Boy, Orange and Blue, St. Edward' s College Echo, The Bay- 
lor Literary and the Comenian. 

— First Freshman (on a ladder, nailing up picture : " Say, Bill, 
got any thumb tacks ?' ' 

Second Freshman : " No, but I've got finger-nails." — Ex. 

— 'Rastus : "Sambo, what's yo' doin' dese days?£~ 

Sambo: " I' se an oculist in er hotel. " 

' Rastus ! ' ' Yo' doan mean it. ' ' 

Sambo : " Yes, Ah cut de eyes out of de 'taters." — Decaturian. 

— We are awaiting the next number of the Orange a?id Blue 
with much interest, as we are very anxious to see what ' ' Miss Jen- 
nie Reynolds of Auburn ' ' will do next. 

— The cover on the Vail-Deane Budget is very neat, and the 
contents equally as good. 

— Ignorance may be bliss, yet the real self-satisfied chap is the 
one who imagines he knows it all. — College Topics. 

— The Decaturian is one of the best magazines that comes to 
our table. The stories are all clever and worth reading. 

— St. Edward's College Echo would be improved by an Ex- 
change column. 

— "The Beauties of Nature," in the Comenian., is a very good 
article. 



2598 The Euterpean. 

in ILigijtcr Vein. 

A Lover of Trees. 



Harry L. Percy, of the Republican Club House Committee, 
New York, overheard an amusing conversation at the ladies' recep- 
tion in the new club house last week. A very pretty girl was talk- 
ing to an elderly gentleman. They were standing by the window 
in the lounging room, facing Bryant Park. 

' ' Oh, Colonel, ' ' said the young lady, ' ' just look at those trees. 
Aren't they beautiful?" 

" Yes, to some extent," replied the old warrior, " but — " 

" Why, don't you like trees?" interrupted the girl. 

"Indeed, I do! There were times when I positively loved 
them — during the war. ' ' — Philadelphia Ledger. 



She "Was Too Sharp for Him. 



She was a good-natured, happy-looking Irishwoman, who 
walked into a store a few days ago and asked the price of collars 
that were displayed in the shop window. 

" Twenty-five cents for two," said the clerk. 

" How much would that be for one?" the women then asked. 

' ' Thirteen cents, ' ' answered the clerk quickly. 

The old woman pondered, and then with her finger figured on 
the sleeve of her coat. After her efforts she demanded : 

"That would make the other 12 sints, wouldn't it? Jest give 
that one to me." — Philadelphia Ledger. 



The good old summer time has gone. 
Soon on the ice we'll slide ; 
And the man who used to shut the door 
Will leave it open wide. 

— Selected. 



-Flattery may be incense, but it isn't frank-incense. 

— Copied. 



THE HESPERIAN. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Florence Moorman — Editor-in-chief. 
Cammie Lindley — Assistant Editor. 
Ora Hunter — Literary Editor. 
Brietz Thom — Exchange Editor 
Rusha Sherrod— Business Manager. 



35tutorial 23eyartment. 



— New Year again ! Old Father Time seems to hurry more 
nowadays than he once did. It seems only a short while, not over 
two months, since we, the editorial staff of '03 and '04, took up our 
work. It has proved to be very pleasant work indeed, and we have 
one and all enjoyed doing it. Let us hope that the future has just 
the same amount of pleasure connected with our work in store 
for us. 

New Year is the time to make resolutions ! Let us make one 
and keep it. We resolve that we will try our best to improve each 
month's edition of The Academy, and as has been said before 
we cannot do this alone. You, girls, collectively and individually, 
must help us, or we can do nothing. Will you not make the reso- 
lution that you'll help us ? Each girl take an interest in the paper 
and do all in her power to make it good. 

And now, we hope, that this year of 1904 will prove the happi- 
est and most successful year in every way that you have ever known. 
A very happy New Year to one and all ! 



5000 The Hesperian. 

Tennyson, the Poet. 



F. M., 05 



It was merely the accident of his hour, the call of his age 
which made Tennyson a philosophic poet. He was naturally not 
only a pure lover of beauty, but a pure lover of beauty in a pecu- 
liar sense. He exhibited his abstract love of the beautiful in one 
most personal and characteristic fact. He was never so successful 
or so triumphant as when he was discussing not nature but art. He 
could describe a statue as Shelly could a cloud. In describing 
buildings he was at his very best. His description, for example, 
of the Palace of Art is a thing entirely victorious and unique. 

Tennyson loved beauty in completeness as we find it in art, not 
in its incompleteness as we find it in Nature. There is, perhaps, 
more loveliness in Nature than in Art, but there are not as many 
lovely things. 

In reading Tennyson's natural descriptions we never seem to 
be in physical contact with the earth. We see the whole scene ac- 
curately, but we see it through a glass. We see Nature, indeed, 
and hear it but we do not smell it. 

But this poet of beauty and a certain magnificent idleness, 
lived, it must be remembered, at a time when all men had to wrestle 
and decide. 

Tennyson's influence on poetry may for a time be modified. 
This is the fate of every man who throws himself into his own age, 
catches the echo of its temporary phrases, and is kept busy in bat- 
tling with its temporary delusions. There are many men whom his- 
tory has for a time forgotten to whom it owes much. But if Ten- 
nyson is extinguished it will be with the most glorious distinction. 
There are two ways in which a man may vanish — through being 
thoroughly conquered or through being thoroughly the conqueror. 
In the main, the great broad church philosophy which Tennyson 
uttered has been adopted by every one. This will make against 
his fame. For a man may vanish as Chaos vanished in the face of 
Creation or he may vanish as God vanished in filling all things with 
that created life. 

" Howe'er it be it seems to me 
'Tis only noble to be good, 
Kind hearts are more than coronets, 
And simple faith than Norman blood." 

Tennysori s ' ' Lady Clara Vere de Vere. ' ' 



The Hesperian. 3001 

A Literary Scene. 



F. M. , '05. 



Most of the guests had already arrived at "The House with 
the Green Shutters" on " No. 5 John Street," in " Stringtown-on- 
the-Pike," where there was to be " The Houseparty. " 

The host and hostess, "Uncle Max" and "Aunt Diana," 
familiarly known as ' ' We Two, ' ' were an ideal couple. They were 
giving a kind of New Year's party to their many friends and it is 
when almost all of the guests have arrived that we take up our 
scene. 

"Beautiful Joe," the pet dog of the host, barks furiously as 
" David Harum," " A Gentleman from Indiana," appears around 
"The Twin of the Road" and passes "Uncle Tom's Cabin" with 
his horse " Black Beauty," at full speed. 

Within the house the assembled guests, seated in the parlor, 
chat gaily. A glowing fire burns brightly on the hearth, and the 
host is in the act of lighting the lamp with the ' ' Lamplighter, ' ' 
which is rolled paper. Sweet music fills the air, rendered by ' ' The 
Choir Invisible," with the melodious chirping of "The Cricket on 
the Hearth," and, assisted by "Uncle Remus," playing on "The 
Fifth String " of " The First Violin. ' ' 

There are gathered people from different States, ' ' A Carolina 
Cavalier ' ' and ' ' An Arkansas Planter ' ' figuring prominently among 
the number. 

Seated together we see ' ' Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch ' ' 
and ' • Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall, ' ' eagerly discussing their 
" homes," while near them " The Man from Glengarry " relates, in 
a loud voice, incidents of ' ' Glengarry School Days " to " The 
Honorable Peter Stirling," " A Tennessee Judge." 

In one corner of the room, " Behind the Scenes," as it were, 
' ' Tommy and Grizel ' ' are seated ' ' Side by Side " on a sofa. He 
tells her that she is ' ' The One Woman " in " The Wide, Wide 
World ' ' and is promptly called ' ' Sentimental Tommy. ' ' 

"Janice Meredith," "Lazarre," "Eleanor" and "Doctor 
Dick" play a game of checkers on a table in the middle of the 
room. Two checkers being lost a ' ' Red Rock ' ' and a ' ' Black 
Rock ' ' are substituted. 



3002 The Hesperian 

Seated on the floor and grouped about the chair of dear ' ' Old 
Mother Goose" are the "Little Men" and "Little Women." 
Thev listen to the story of ' ' The Little Shepherd of Kingdom 
Come," told in the voice they love so well. We see among the 
group "Emmy Lou," "Helen's Babies," "Little Lord Fauntle- 
roy, " " Sara Crewe, " " Little Saint Elizabeth ' ' and ' ' Little 
Patsey. 

In one corner a group discusses the social events of the day. 
"John Maxwell's Marriage" to "Hetty Wesley," which took place 
at " Eastover Courthouse," and how " The Colonel's Money " was 
left to "Richard Carvel," the " Heir of Redclyffe. " And at this 
point "Sylvia," "The Congressman's Wife," remarks that if she 
had "Colonel Myttleton's Money" she would join the "Soldiers 
of Fortune" who could afford to walk with " Hearts Courageous." 

On the window ledge two girls sit, "Dorothy South" and 
"Mary St. John," talking in awed whispers about "Brewster's 
Millions," and at the same time casting such glances at the gentle- 
man in question that one would think he was ' ' The Main Chance. 

' ' Averil ' ' and ' ' Kate Bonnet ' ' stand by the cage of the pet 
of the hostess, " A Speckled Bird," who, being a parrot, is arguing 
with them as to whether she is ' ' Polly, an Old-fashioned Girl ' ' or 
"Polly, a New-fashioned Girl." 

"The Bishop," " The Vicar of Wakefield," "The New Rec- 
tor" and "The Little Minister" discuss "Sermons," "The Chris- 
tian" and " The Master Christian." 

"David Copperfield " and "Silas Marner" smoke and talk 
of " Lovey Mary," saying that she, although "Not Like Other 
Girls" is "A Genuine Ladv " and "A Girl in Ten Thousand." 

Then looking around further we see "A Sweet Girl Graduate" 
in earnest conversation with ' ' A Hoosier Schoolmaster ' ' discussing 
"The Lives of the Hunted." And by them, talking in her shrill 
treble is " Mistress Joy," who does her best to fulfil all " Wanteds" 
such as "Wanted — A Matchmaker," "Wanted — A Chaperone, " 
and so on. She listens to " A Friend of Caesar" tell of "The 
Reign of Terror" in "The Heart of Rome," longing all the while 
to do the talking herself. 

" Your Uncle Lew's " voice is heard, asking permission :o use 
"The Cardinal's Snuff-box" for the sake of the Davs of " Auld 



The Hesperian. 300o 

Lang Syne," while, in the mean time, he casts a reproachful look 
at his nephew, " Daniel Deronda," "The Jew of Malta," who sits 
with his hands in his pockets, whistling. "The Old Gentleman of 
the Blackstock ' ' mutters something about ' ' The Idle Thoughts of 
an Idle Fellow." 

"Gordon Keith," "The Virginian," tells "Margaret Mont- 
ford," "Lady Rose's Daughter," "What Katy Did" "In the 
Golden Days" "When Knighthood was in Flower." And to- 
gether they discuss the "Crisis" "In Connection with the De 
Willoughby Claim." 

Now, let us glance into a corner, where the room is darker, 
where sit a young man and woman, " Betsey Ross" and "Hugh 
Wynne, ' ' talking over the past and present, which began as ' ' Just 
a Summer Affair" " One Summer" several years ago, and which 
has ripened into something warmer than mere friendship. He says, 
"You are now 'My Guardian Angel,' but won't you be my wee 
wifie ?' '•' She blushes and droops her head and — but here we draw 
the curtain'. 



Soctetg j^otes anU Hocals. 



CAMMIE LINDLEY. 



— Among the many pleasant evenings we had last month was 
one given to us by the Star Course. 

— One evening we were entertained by Mrs. Fannye Rice 
Purdy, showing us the wonderful doll cabinet. The proceeds of 
this entertainment were for the Memorial Chapel. 

— We were happily surprised when we received an invitation 
to^attend the wedding of Miss Bertha Shelton, which was sol- 
emnized in a most beautiful manner. 

— We were sorry to have our president leave some days before 
Christmas, but we hope her health will be much improved when 
she returns. 



3004 The Hesperian. 

— Miss Leonora Johnston spent the Christmas holidays with 
Miss Ackerman in New York. 

— We hope Miss Bonney will soon be home from the hospital 
as the Science room seems vacant without her presence. 

— The Vesper Services have been very much enjoyed for the 
last three or four Sundays, as the girls and every one seem to take 
so much interest in them, and we appreciated the talk that Mr. 
Fries gave us on Dec. 13th, and also the reading by Miss Ack- 
erman. 

— With much pleasure we note Mr. Pfohl's return. For 
some weeks he has been traveling South. 



ISxcfjange Bepartmatt. 



Brietz Thom. 



— The space for our department is very limited this month, 
consequently we are not permitted to say anything about the maga- 
zines crowding the table. 

The Exchange Editor gives many hearty wishes for a Happy 
New Year to all our readers. 



1 ' Time has laid his hand 
Upon my heart gently, not smiting it, 
But as a harper lays his open palm 
Upon his harp to deaden its vibrations." 

— Longfellow, 



The Academy. 3005 



HISTORY OF WACHOVIA 

IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

By Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph. D. 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Cloth bound, 400 pages, 32 maps and illustrations, gilt back and side title- 
Printed by Doubleday, Page & Co., New York. Price, delivered, $2.00. 

A Word to Patrons and Former Pupils. 

A copy of the new history should be in the home of every patron, to bring him into close 
sympathy with the history of the town and section, as well as the school. The former pupils 
will find satisfaction in renewing the memory of school days by reading the pages of this 
carefully written and neatly bound book. The many illustrations too will give you pleasure. 

The Charlotte Observer publishes an extended review of the above 
work, concluding with the following lines : 

" A very instructive chapter comes near the close of the volume, giv- 
ing a history of the Moravian Church, or "Unitas Fratrum," as they styled 
themselves. The last chapter gives a sketch of the lives of the eleven 
Principals of Salem Academy and Col ege, from Samuel Kransch, in 1802, 
down to the present incumbant. This chapter is written by Miss Lehman, 

" We are still indebted to Dr. Clewell for giving us the history of this 
unique and interesting people. Whoever has visited o d Salem, and seen 
its unique houses, its shaded groves, its venerable graveyard with recum- 
bent tombstones, its church with its beautiful and impressive ceremony, its 
venerable graveyard with recumbent tombstones, its church with its beau- 
tiful and impressive ceremony, its far famed schools, its evidences of thrift 
and sobriety, whoever has seen all these things has wished that he might 
learn more of the simple, earnest, Christian people that have builded here 
so well. 

" Dr. Clewell has made judicious use of his sources in writing this his- 
tory, and has told his story in a straightforward, scholarly manner. He has 
evidently gone th ough with much pa'ient and laborious research in the 
prosecution of his task. The result, a handsomely bound volume in cloth 
and gold, stands very much to his credit, and is a cause for just pride both 
to himself and the people he represents." 

Address, Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



3006 The Academy. 

James S. Dunn, 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C„ 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

LIFE INSURANCE 



Ten Years' Successful 
Experience. 



Parties wishing to buy. sell or 

rent property will find it to 

their interest to see me. 



Correspondence solicited 



HE MHM1 BAELn 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



CreanrTuffs, ~) 20 cts. VaniUa Wafers, ~) 10 cts. 

Crescents, > per Kissts, > per 

Cup Cakes, J dozen. Macaroons, 1 dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 

Wwmw WmMm Wmm MM®* 



The Academy. 



3007 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment of rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs. Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others tnat h«ve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a st . ck that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others that will 
please the most exclusive and exac ing taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOKOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




_£ 



Schouler's Department Store 



3008 The Academy. 

102d YEA.R 



$ALGm ACADGIBY 

ADD (JOLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, IV, O. 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos tComenius, and, throngh the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parents who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ing of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared, 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each o 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care o' 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which will 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 



The Academy. 



3009 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM, N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type-Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogua. 

JAS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 

YOU 

WANT 

THE 

SHOE 

THAT'S 

ALL 

THE 

GO ? 



IP 
SO 

SEE 

US 



■WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOISTES. 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supp. ied 
■with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. l 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 
At Depot ask/or Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



3010 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHO TOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 



"When you send your daughter to SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE would 
it not be a good plan to place your son in 

BINGHAM SCHOOL, 

Established in 1793. 

NEAR MEBANE, N. C. 

An institution for boys offering a beautiful and healthful country home in 
Orange County, Piedmont section, on Southern Railway. No bar rooms. Fac- 
ulty of specialists, all graduates. Bible, physical culture and penmanship em- 
phasized. Scholarships, prizes and medals. Gymnasium. Healthful outdoor 
sports. Fare, wholesome and abundant. No hazing tolerated. Discipline kind 
but firm. Terms reasonable. For handsomelv illustrated catalogue, sent free, 

Address, PRESTON LEWIS GRAY, BL, Principal. 

Mebane, N. C. 



NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January ioih, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



1793-The Bingham School-1902-03 

Located on the Asheville Plateau since 1891. Military. U. S. Army Officer de- 
tailed. Twenty States represented this year, from Massachusetts aud Dakota 
on the North to Texas and Florida on the South 
$125 per half-term. Address Col. R. Bingham, Supt., Post Office. Asheville, N. C. 



The Academy. 3011 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 



ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



5012 The Academy. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE, 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, JV. C. 



Ml. O. BI 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBER, 

TIKNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 



THE ACADEMY. 



Vol. 27. Winston-Salem, N. C, Febuary, 1904. No. 235. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



lEfcitottal. 



— The Academy extends its sympathy to Dr. Mclver and to 
all connected with the State Normal College in their great loss by 
fire. While we deplore the loss of the buildings and the loss of 
personal property sustained by the students it will always be a 
cause of ereat thankfulness that there was no loss of life. 



— The school record of the winter will be considered a memor- 
able one, because of the loss of property by fire sustained by two 
well known institutions. We feel great sympathy for our neighbors 
at Oxford, N. C. , in their recent calamity, and we can only hope 
that out of the temporary loss may arise a permanent gain for Dr. 
Hobgood and his associates in the new and improved buildings 
which we trust will arise in the future. At Oxford as at Greensboro 
there is cause for thankfulness because there was no loss of life. 



— The splendid snow which covered the ground end of Janu- 
uary was thoroughly enjoyed by the School. Manv of the girls 



3014 The Academy. 

from the far south had their first romp in the " beautiful snow," and 
we are glad to note that no bad results followed the three or four 
days' frolic. 



— The visit of Mr. Wolle was a notable event in the musical I 
world of town and school. A full account of the visit is given else- 
where, and we will only say in this connection that the Professor 
made a delightful impression as a musician, and he and his amiable 
wife made many friends by their cordiality and by their hearty res- j 
ponse to all that was done for them while our guests. 

— We regret that several members of our school family became ! 
ill at their homes during the Christmas recess. The freedom from 
serious illness within the school during the past year is a cause for 
very great thankfulness. Of course, we have our share of colds 
and now and then a pupil will spend a week in the Infirmary. But : 
a kind providence has held a protecting hand over us, and to Him 
we return thanks for the blessing of health within our large school ; 
family. 

— We call attention to the changes in the department in charge j 
of the Literary Societies. It is the desire of those connected with 
the paper to make it just as good as possible, and what is being 
done has this object in view. We may add that a call has come 
from various sources to give more space to letters from former pupils. 
This we will try to do, and hence we request the alumnae to favor , j 
us with friendly letters, telling us what you are now doing and thus j 
coming into touch with your friends who are readers of The 
Academy. 



— Our deepest sympathy goes out to Mrs. Ellen Starbuck, 
our former Alumnae President, and to her children, Judge and Mrs. 
Henry R. Starbuck, in the sad death of the little son of the latter. 
The terrible death of the dear little fellow while he was engaged in 
the sport of coasting was a shock to our community such as we 
have seldom experienced. We trust that a kind Heavenly Father 
will bring comfort to them in this time of sorrow. 



: 



The Academy. 3015 

Water. 

It is a fact which fs apparent to all who have studied the sub- 
ject that good, pure water is one of the first essentials to health. 
This is true in the case of the individual, and it is, therefore, espe- 
cially true in the case of responsibility for a large number centering 
in a single administration. It is, therefore, a matter of special sat- 
isfaction to us to present to our readers the result of an analysis 
made some weeks ago of the water drawn from the drinking foun- 
tain in the school, where water is used, for drinking purposes by 
about 400 persons daily. 

The sample was drawn and sent to the State chemist, as is 
done by the water company each 3 months. The State official has 
no interest whatever in the report, save to make it correct. Hence 
the report is absolutely reliable. It will be noticed that there is no 
injurious element and no undesirable feature in the test. The only 
bacteria are of the common saprophytic type, such as are found in 
all water, but even these are few compared with the numbers which 
often exist in the best drinking water. Finally the unsolicited tes- 
timony of the State chemist that the sample is "excellent water" 
makes us feel that in this important respect our school is greatly 
blessed. The following is the official report : — 

North Carolina Board of Health. 
Biological Laboratory. 
Agricultural Building, Raleigh, N. C. 
Analytical Number, 225. 
Sender's Mark, Number III. 
Date of Report, 8-29-' 03. 

Sample of water from a tap located in Salem Academy and 
College, Salem, N. C. 

Sent by Superintendent of Water Works. 
Received at Laboratory, 8-22' -03. 
Result of Physical Examination : 

Temperature, 26° C. 

Turbidity, 0. 

Sediment, 0. 

Color, 0. 



3016 The Academy, 

Odor, 0. 

Reaction, Neutral. 
Gas production, — 
Nitrates, 0. 
Results of Biological Examination : 
Contains no algae. 
Contains no infusoria. 
Contains no Organic Detritus. 

Contains Bacteria of common saprophytic groups, 
total per cubic centimeter, 300. 
Remarks by analyst, " excellent water !" 

Gerald McCarthy, 

Biologist. 

This report is one which is very valuable to us as a school, 
and is undoubtedly one which will be a great comfort to patrons 
whose children are in the school. 

When to this we add the absolutely regular habits of those 
within the school, the care given to the proper heating of rooms, 
halls and dormitories, and the personal supervision of the ladies in 
charge of the various room companies we find that the cause of our 
good health in the past has not been due to chance, but next to the 
Lord's blessing it is due to the circumstances to which we have 
alluded in this sketch. 

In this connection it is well worth our interest to quote from 
the memorabilia written by Bishop Rondthaler, and read in the 
Salem Home church New Year's Eve last. He says, in speaking 
of the freedom from numerous cases of illness of any kind in our 
community : ' ' Government reports show that the section of the 40 
or 50 miles of our State in which Forsyth 'County lies has the high- 
est health record of any section of the Uniied States." This record, 
together with the analysis of the drinking water, and the great per- 
sonal care over the individual exercised by room teacher and pro- 
fessional nurse show to us some of the reasons for the remarkable 
kealth record of the present and past history of our college. 






The Academy. 3017 

from alumna and other friends. 

All communications for this Department should be addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
from former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



— From Hearne, Texas, we receive the following' kind words : 

" I have just received the January No. of The Academy in its 
new cover. The little items of the ' ' Happy Christmas Tide ' ' at the 
Academy brings back many pleasant memories of the " long ago," 
and I regret more than ever that I could not spend the holidays 
with my little grandaughter there rather than have her come home. 

"With sincere regards, I am, truly, 

"Mrs. T. C. Westbrook." 

— A private letter from Prof. Skilton will be of interest to his 
many friends and former pupils. The letter was not intended for 
publication, but as Prof. Skilton is always thought of as a part of 
our circle we feel sure he will pardon the liberty we take in printing 
the same. The Academy extends its best wishes for a long and 
happy married life, with much sunshine and few shadows : 

' ' You have probably learned by this time that I shall soon 
leave the estate of "single blessedness," and will join the ranks of 
the "great majority." I am to marry Miss Maud Grignard, of 
New York city. . Her paternal grandfather was President of the 
Imperial Railway of France, and her maternal grandfather was 
Clerk of the Canadian government after 1876, and prior to that 
time he was Inspector of Education of all Bohemia ; very likely 
some of your Moravian connections in Prague will know of him. 
His name is Masac. 

' ' I am very happy in the prospect of my new life, and when I 
am happy I think at once of the Salem friends, who did so much to 
make me so, and therefore I am writing to you. 

' ' My work here in Kansas is very interesting, and of the ad- 
ministrative order, such as I have always wished to undertake. 

' ' Remember me most cordially to all of my friends. 
' ' Sincerely yours, 

Charles S. Skilton." 

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 

— The following friendly greeting brings back to the mind a 
familiar and greatly esteemed pupil : 

" For some time I have intended writing to you and subscrib- 



3018 The Academy. 

ing to The Academy. I get so homesick for dear old S. F. A., 
and often think of the year spent there, and how happy we all were 
in Park Hall. I hear you have many improvements. I am so 
glad you have such a large school this year. I am keeping house 
in my own home, and have a dear little home. Give my love to 
Mrs. Clewell, Miss Lehman and to the other teachers. 

" With best wishes, I am, 

"Annie Purnell Drewry." 

Norfolk, Va. 

— " Doodles" is a pet in Room 10. Some time since when 
little Ruth Greider was on board a vessel from South America 
which stopped at her West India home, a sailor gave ' ' Doodles ' ' 
to Ruth. " Doodles " is a small turtle, or rather a terrapin, beauti- 
fully shaped and perfectly marked and colored, and quite harm- 
less. He has had a number of adventures since he left his home in 
distant South America. When Ruth brought him to Pennsylvania 
' ' Doodles ' ' went on an investigating tour in an orchard hard by 
the home, and was given up as lost, but he knew his friends too 
well to leave them in that unceremonious manner. So he appeared 
in good time, was put in a proper place of safety and was brought 
to North Carolina. He seems to enjoy the superabundance of at- 
tention which the numerous girls in Room 10 bestow upon him, 
and gazes lazily about him in the day time, and sleeps comfortably 
in his soft bed at night. On one night, however, something dread- 
ful happened. " Doodles" was taken out on the campus, and by 
an oversight was left there. The next morning he was missed and 
with a cry of dismay search was instituted. Now the cold winter 
night of North Carolina was too much for the terrapin reared under 
the tropical sun of Brazil. Therefore as he was brought in stiff and 
cold, with frost covering his shell, the cry arose " Doodles is dead !" 
Plans were at once set on foot for a very grand funeral, but 
"Doodles" was not yet ready to be buried. As he was placed 
near a stove the frost soon disappeared, life returned to his head 
and legs, and putting forth his head he surveyed the preparations 
with an interested air as if to say, " yes, but I am not yet ready to 
be buried." So he was not buried and if you visit Room 10 the 
proud owner of "Master Doodles" will be pleased to introduce 
vou to his lordship. 



The Academy. 3019 

MUSIC NOTES. 



Mr. Wolle's organ recital was a musical event of real import- 
ance, not only in the Academy, but also to the people of Salem, who 
were most glad to welcome this Moravian organist on his first visit 
to Salem. Mr. J. Fred Wolle was born in Bethlehem, Pa., and, 
after studying in New "York and abroad, settled in his native place, 
and by his work as founder and director of the Bach Festivals, 
given in Bethlehem, has made a most enviable reputation for him- 
self and attracted attention from all over the country to this Mora- 
vian town and its most interesting musical life. It was here that 
Haydn's " Creation " was given its first complete rendition in this 
country early in the last century, and now, nearly one hundred 
years later, Mr. Wolle has given several of Bach's most important 
works for the first time in this country, and has come to be consid- 
ered one of the best interpreters of Bach's works in America. 

Preparations are now going on, under Mr. Wolle's leadership, 
for a " Bach Cycle." The first session of three days in length will 
be given in December, 1904, and will give the compositions relat- 
ing to Christ's birth. The second session, just before Holv Week, 
in the Spring of 1905, will have for its theme the Crucifixion of 
Christ, while the third period in May, 1905, will bring the Ascen- 
sion period to a fitting close with the great B Minor Mass. 

The following program was given at the recital, which was 
played on the " Home" church organ, Jan. 14th : 

Fantaisie and Fugue. The Great G Minor. . . . Bach. 

Fugue. The Little G Minor Bach. 

Chorale. " Herzlteh that mich verlangen " . . .Bach. 

Chorale. Alle Menchen muessen sterben Bach. 

Pastorale in C Bach. 

Allegretto in G Bach. 

Toccata in F Bach. 

Melody in B flat Jonas. 

Scherzo (from the Second Organ Symphony ). Widor. 
Litany. Every soul at rest is sleeping. . . .Schubert. 

Siegfried's Death March Wagner. 

Theme and Finale Thiele. 

Mr. Wolle has great technic and it was wonderful to the initiated' 
to see how he managed the hundred year old organ. The themes- 
were always given prominence and constant interest was maintained 
by his skilful registration. 

The Bach numbers displayed many sides of the master's mind. 
The Widor Scherzo was played with such apparent case that the 
amazing technic exhibited was scarcelv thought of. The beauties- 
of the Schubert Litany will long be remembered by many hearc s. 



3020 The Academy. 

Mr. Wolle's own arrangement of " Siegfried's Death March" from 
' ' Die Gotterdammerung ' ' brought out unexpected powers of the 
organ, and was a fine example of arranging from an orchestral 
score. The inspiration from hearing a real artist has far-reaching 
effects, and the influence of Mr. Wolle's visit cannot be estimated 
in words. 

Mr. Wolle's visit, from a musical standpoint, has been spoken 
of on another page. The social side of it was no less a success. He 
and his charming wife were the guests of Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, 
though really the whole school felt an interest in this Moravian or- 
ganist who was among us for the first time. On their arrival they 
found an invitation to luncheon awaiting them from the members of 
Thursday's Cooking Class, and quite won the hearts of the girls by 
their hearty appreciation of the dainty dishes. This spirit of cor- 
diality and enthusiasm marked all the days of their visit, and it is 
probably due to this, as much as to anything else, that they have 
left such a happy impression with us. 

On the evening of the same day a reception was given them by 
the Principal, at which the Faculty and several outside friends had 
an opportunity to meet this gifted man. He was the genial, good 
fellow now, and next evening when we were listening to his divine 
music we wondered at our temerity in having such a thoroughly 
good time with him. In the midst of the merriment, the trombone 
band was outside, playing that grand old hymn, ' ' Thy majesty how 
vast it is." Mr. Wolle's love for the trombones had evidently been 
found out, and they had come down to do him honor. Next morn- 
ing was taken up with a visit to Mr. Reynold's tobacco factory, 
where the singing of the negroes very much impressed our musi- 
cian, and later to a tobacco sale in one of the warehouses. 

The recital in the evening has received the attention due such 
an able performance. Next day, the weather still being pleasant, 
Mrs. Clewell took the guests to Bethabara, that pface so full of 
historic interest to all Moravians. 

One of the most enjoyable features of this school-year has been 
the chapel receptions, where pleasure is both given to some talented, 
interested friend by the school in its singing and other exercises, 
and it in turn receives a contribution of eloquence or music, as the 
case may be, from the guest. The inspiration gained by the pupils 
in thus coming in close touch with men who have set high ideals 
before them and have been content with nothing less than the best, 
cannot but have its influence in the school work, besides being no 
mean factor in their character building. The" Chapel service, which 
Mr. Wolle beautified with his lovely music, will always remain a 
pleasant memory to all of us who were fortunate enough to be 
present. It was his farewell, for he left in the afternoon, notwith- 
standing our pleas for a longer stay. 



The Academy. 3021 

The work in the Organ Department has been quietly going on, 
and very few people know how much is really being done. The 
motor has tantrums sometimes, but usually it is very well behaved, 
and the practice begins at seven o'clock in the morning and con- 
tinues until nine in the evening. All the church positions in town, 
with a single exxeption, are filled by Academy students, Misses 
Jeter and Pfaff having recently begun playing, — the former at 
Calvary Church and the latter at the First Presbyterian. The songs 
in our own Vesper Services are made much more impressive by the 
piano and organ accompaniment, the organ students, of whom there 
are a large number, taking turns in playing. Besides adding to the 
beauty and solemnity of the service, it is splendid practice for the 
budding organist in getting her accustomed to an audience. 

The special teachers' faculty meeting, called once a month by 
Prof. Shirley, is proving of immense value, especially to the 
Music Department. The need of each individual pupil is discussed 
and remedies suggested, weak points in teaching are pointed out, 
and there is a general untangling of knotty problems. The leading 
musical periodicals have been subscribed for by the teachers, and by 
means of this circulating library, for each paper goes all the way 
around, they are kept informed of all that is going on in the musical 
world. 

The January Pupils' Recital was unusually good as was attested 
by the hearty appreciation of the large audience of interested friends. 

Some of the old girls will be interested to hear that Gertrude 
Brown is again studying with Mr. Parsons, in New York, and is 
as enthusiastic as ever about her work. Carrie Lineback is 
teaching in the Blind Institute in Nashville and is meeting with the 
success she deserves. Miss Jeter. 

. In Memoriam. 



The death of Mrs. Blanche Robbins Holcomb, daughter of 
Hon. and Mrs. William Robbins, of Statesville, N. C , on January 
21st, is one of the sad dispensations of Providence, that calls forth 
the sympathies of all who knew her here in the Academy, and in 
her wide circle of relatives and friends in Statesville. 

She was a graduate of the Class of 1896, and in 1902 was 
married to the Evangelist, Rev. Walter Holcomb. Her health had 
been poor for some time, and the distressing accident which so 
quickly closed her bright young life was caused by her clothing 
taking fire while the physician was cupping her. The burns were 
not sufficiently severe to cause her death, but the nervous shock was 
too great in her enfeebled condition, and she passed away in the 
bloom of her young womanhood, just when life has so much to offer 
in its golden promise. She is the first member of her class to pass 
over to the great majority, deeply mourned and lamented by all. 



3022 The Academy. 

Under the Snow. 



The publication of the work entitled "Boner's Lyrics," has 
aroused renewed interest in the writings of our Salem poet, and as 
the following earlier poem is not found in the printed collection we 
give it below in full. It was first published March, 1864. 

The brown old earth lies quiet and still 

Under the snow, 
The furrows are hid on the broken hill 

Under the snow, 
Every twig is fringed with mossy pearl, 
The drooping cedars bend to the ground, 
The rose bush is drifted into a mound, 
And still from the silent sky to the ground, 
The white flakes noiselessly whirl. 

The roads and fields are buried deep 

Under the snow, 
The hedges lie in a tangled heap 

Under the snow, 
And the little grey rabbi's under them creep, 
While the twittering sparrows cunningly peep 
From the sheltering brier and cozily sleep 

Under the snow. 

The rough old barn and the sheds near by ; 
The mounded straws of the wheat and rye 

Are covered with snow ; 
The straggling fences are softened with down — 
Every post is white with a beautiful crown 

Of drifted snow. 

And I think, as I sit in the gloaming here 
Watching the objects disappear, 
How many things are folded low 
Under the drifts of the falling snow. 

There are hearts that once were full of love 

Under the snow 
There are eyes that once did beam with love. 

Under the snow. 
There are lips that once were like the rose, 
There are bosoms that were stung with woes, 



The Academy 3023 

There are forms that once were praised in song, 
There are breasts that once were true and strong, 
O, there's a strange and a mighty throng 
Under the snow. 

Another mound will once lie deep 

Under the snow, 
And I will with the Pale Ones sleep 

Under the snow ! 
O, God ! stream on my heart Thy grace, 
That in the love-light of Thy face 
I may rejoice when Death shall pass 
And place my mouldering body low 

Under the snow. 



$11 ILigljter Ymx. 



Our friend and former patron, Mr. Wm. S. Sieger, never 
wearies of sending to us clippings from the papers, giving the 
humorous side of life. The following account of the remarkable 
sagacity of a Texas dog is respectfully refered to our Texas readers 
for verification. 

' ' It was down in Texas several years ago that I came across the 
greatest dog I ever saw or heard of," said a calvary officer, as 
quoted in the Washington Star. ' ' The animal belonged to a friend 
of mine and was the greatest quail dog you ever saw. We have 
taken that dog out day after day and he would never go wrong, and 
would point quail in the most unlooked for places. One day, as we 
were walking into a town from the army post where I was stationed, 
a well-dressed stranger passed us. Immediately the dogs stuck his 
tail in the air and assumed the attitute recognized as ' pointing. ' 

" It was some time before we were able to determine what he 
was pointing, but finally we decided that it was the stranger, which 
proved to be correct. We called to the man and asked him if he had 
eaten any quail, explaining why we asked. He said he had nothing 
of the kind and did not remember having eaten any for some months. 
Turning to my friend, I said : 

' ' ' Your old dog has gone wrong. ' 



3024 The Academy. 

" ' Not a bit of it,' he replied. ' That dog is right and I'll bet 
you ten dollars he is. ' 

' ' I did not see how the bet was going to be settled, but took 
it up, anyway, and we continued on to town. We went to the big- 
gest hotel in the place to get some refreshments, and there saw the 
stranger we had met on the road. My friend asked the clerk who 
the stranger was, and the clerk pointed to the register. As soon as 
my friend saw the name he gave a yell and called me over there. 

" ' Give me your money, my boy,' he exclaimed. ' That dog 
knew what he was doing when he pointed that man. ' 

' ' ' To satisfy myself I glanced at the register and saw the 
stranger's name. It was ' Robert F. Partridge ! ' " 



i&artteti. 



Tinnin — Whitsett — On February 3d, 1904, in Greensboro, N. C, Mr. 
Thomas Decatur Tinnin, Jr., to Miss Minnie Suella Whitsett. 

Smith — Gibson. — In Concord, N. C, in December, 1903. Mr. C. L. 
Smith to Miss Katherine Gibson. 

Harrington — Fleming.— On January 6th, 1904. in the Baptist church, 
of Pactolus, N. C, Mr. Robert Daniel Harrington to Miss Blanche 
Elizabeth Fleming. 

Ellis — Webster. — On December 30th, 1903, Mr. Robert Lee Ellis, 
of Baltimore, Md., to Miss Nannie Webster, of Winston. 

Bkickey— Johnson. — On January 6th. 1904, at Marianna, Ark., Mr. 
Garland Smith Brickey to Miss Sarah Agnes Johns: on. 

Watson — Vaughn. — In Greensboro, N. C, December 29th, 1903, Mr. 
F. Watson to Miss Carrie Vaughn, both of Winston, N. C. 

Fenet — Thompson. — On Jan. 23d, 1904, in Benton, La., Mr. Courtney 
Fenet to Miss Mamie Thompson. 



Mitib, 



Holcomr. — On January 21st, 1904, in Statesville, N". C, Mrs. Blanche 
Roubins Holcomb, 111. li Robbins. Class of '96. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 

AND 

THE HESPERIAN. 



This department is devoted to the combined interests of the 
Enterpean and Hesperian Literary Societies. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Agnes Belle Goldsby, E. L. S. 1 17,1:, ^.^ ;„ ru;^c 

t-. ». fI • c- > fc.uitors-in-Lniet. 

Florence Moorman, H. L. S. J 

Mary B. Gudger, E. L. S. ) 

Frances Powers, E. L. S. j- Assistant Editors. 

Cammie Lindlev, H. L S. J 

Helen M. Blandford, E. L. S. \ u Edi 

Ora Hunter, H L. S. i ' 

ShTIhS H . tl. } ***> ■*"«* 

Emma B Greider, E. L. S. ) A ■ 

Ora Hunter. H. L S , j' ArUblb 



?£Tntorial. 



The February sunshine steeps your boughs, 
And tints the buds and swells the leaves within. 

— Bryant. 



— The Academy did not appear upon the scene as early as 
usual last month because her " new gowns" left Philadelphia a day 
or two later than we expected. Chic as the " frocks " are we trust 
that you will not rind them more attractive than the ' ' literary maid 
herself. 



•3026 The Euterpean and The Hesperian 

— Boastful Virginians will be glad to know that the Mero-vir- 
ginians and the Carlo-Virginians ruled Gaul long before the Virgin 
Queen of England was " dreamt of." This statement must be true 
because it was made upon a solemn occasion ( history hour) by a 
learned Senior of '0-1. Those who desire further dates and refer- 
ences concerning this and other equally important historical facts 

will please apply to M , or any other wise maid of the cap and 

:gown. 



Origin of Old Sayings. 

— The Honeymoon.— For thirty days after a wedding the an- 
cient Teutons had a custom of drinking a mead made of honey. 

The Bridegroom — In primitive times the newly wedded man 
had to wait upon his bride and the guests upon his wedding day. 
He was called the groom. 



Sirloin of Beef. — King Charles I., being greatly pleased with 
-a roast loin of beef set before him, declared it '' good enough to be 
knighted." It has ever since been called Sir Loin. 

A Spinster — Women were prohibited from marrying in olden 
times until they had spun a full set of linen furnishings on the spin- 
ning wheel ; hence, till married, they were spinsters. 



Cabal — This word was coined in Charfes II. 's reign, and ap- 
plied to his cabinet council. It was made from the initials of their 
names, which were : Clifford, Arlington, Buckingham, Ashley and 
Lauderdale. 

— Selected. 



The Euterpean and The -Hesperian. 



302: 



The Impression of Collins. 



F M, H L S 




William Collins, a rising young barrister, 
is rather a bright young fellow, — as he 
himself says, ' ' he knows a thing or two, ' ' 
— but. there was a time, so his friends are 
telling, when he didn't even know his own 
name. 

This sad state of affairs was brought 
about in this way. Collins received an in- 
vitation to a reception given by his old 
friend, Mrs. Lloyd-Jones, in honor of her 
guests, Mrs. and Miss Van Doren, of New 
York. Now, Collins distinctly remem- 
bered Miss Van Doren as a pretty blonde, 
whom he had met at the Springs the summer before. At the time 
he had congratulated himself that he had made something of an 
impression. Naturally, therefore, he was glad of this opportunity 
of renewing and perhaps deepening the impression which he fancied 
he had already made. 

Accordingly, on the day of the reception he was one of the 
crowd gathered at Mrs. Lloyd-Jones' elegant home. First, he was 
introduced to Mrs. Van Doren, a portly matron, and then to her 
daughter. Miss Van Doren smiled and bowed graciously, and * 
Collins thought he detected a slight sign of recognition in her 
manner. His vanity rose at this, but he 
determined not to show that he remembered 
her. 

"This, I believe, is your first visit here, is 
it not?" he asked, by way of opening the 
conversation. 

1 ' Yes, ' ' Miss Van Doren replied, ' ' I am 
an entire stranger here. Only this morning 
I was telling mama how queer it seemed to 
visit in a place where one did not know a 
single soul." 

Collins" vanity was fast falling. 




3026 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

" Why," he said, " are you such a stranger as that?"' 

"Yes," she replied," I know no one. Oh, yes," she added, 
' ' I do, too. I met a man from here at the Springs last year. 
Maybe you know him, too. Let me see, what was his name?" 
She puckered up her brow, thoughtfully. 

Collins' vanity began to rise. "Ah," he thoughtt "I see 
I am not entirely forgotten then. ' ' ■ 

"Mama," said Miss Van Doren, addressing that lady, "what 
was the name of that man from here whom we met at the Springs 
last year? I've forgotten it. I haven't forgotten him though. I 
think I never-shall forget him." 

Collins' vanity was decidedly on the increase. " Oh, yes," he 
thought, "I did make something of an impression after all," and 
he mentally patted himself on the shoulder. 

"Why, my dear, I'm sure I don't remember," said Mrs. Van 
Doren, in answer to her daughter's question. "Describe him to 
me and I may recall him. 

Collins was becoming more and more interested. Now, he 
thought, he would hear Miss Van Doren' s opinion of him and learn 
how great an impression he had made. 

" Oh, you know," Miss Van Doren said to her mother, "you 
surely remember that stupid bore of a man who took us to Mrs. 
Willson's dance. I'll never forget how he stepped all over my 
feet. Oh, what was his name? You must remember him." 

Collins was convinced now that an impression had been made, 
but one of a different nature from what he had imagined. His 
vanity fell ano! broke into a million pieces. 

"Yes, I remember him now,'" Miss Van Doren replied, "his 
name was — let me see — Collins, that was it." 

" Yes, it was Collins," Miss Van Doren said. " Do you know 
him?" she asked, turning to Collins. 

" I have never known him very well," Collins managed to say. 
It was the most honest remark he had made in years. Remember 
that Collins was a lawyer. 

' ' I suppose he isn' t here, ' ' continued Miss Van Doren, look- 
ing around the room. " By the by, you'll pardon me, wont you, 
but I did not catch your name when you were introduced. What 
is it?" 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



502'; 



She waited for an answer, but none came. Collins felt his face 
getting red. For the life of him he could not think of anything to 
say . 

" Er— ah — ahem, really," he stammered, "I — er — ah — ahem, 
really, I don't know, excuse me — but I think Browne is trying to 
get a chance to speak to you." 

He moved off hurriedly, and Miss Van Doren looked after him 
with a puzzled expression on her face. 

"What a silly man," she said to Browne, when that person 
joined her. " I asked him his name and he said he didn't know. 
Isn't that the very funniest thing you ever heard." 

Collins was standing with his back to Miss Van Doren, but he 
had heard the conversation, and it has been the one regret of his 
life that he couldn't see Miss Van Doren' s face when Browne said : 

" That chap over there? Why, his name is Collins !" 





302S The Euterpean and The Hesperian 

Some Queer Employments for Women, 



A B G 

Through the snows of Winter and the sunshine of Spring 
" Dame Margaret" bravely attended to her duties as sexton of the 
rude little church in one of the Virginian parishes. The vestry paid 
her a certain amount of tobacco for her service. This seems strange 
to us, vet, in the present era of the world's history, women compe- 
tently fill various positions formerly occupied solely by their ' ' breth- 
ren " or other(?) beasts of burden. 

The Dutch windmill whirls and twirls his giant arms back and 
forth as if he were endeavoring to catch the dazzling sunbeams. 
These mischievous children of the Sun-god merely laugh at his awk- 
ward movements, and dart far away just when their "would-be 
gaelor " thinks that he has surely caught them. A lone figure toils 
slowly up the canal-bank, — it is that of a woman. She draws the 
great boat over the lazy stream by means of strong ropes attached 
to her bent shoulders. Her worthless husband sits outside the 
cabin door, and the thin wreaths of smoke curl upward from his 
slender pipe. The two little ones scamper joyfully over the deck ; 
their shouts reach the weary mother, and she smiles. No complaint 
passes her lips, for is she not laboring for roly-poly Hanschen and 
blue-eyed Gretel? 

A fair daughter of the Netherlands walks down the street 
beside the spotless .milk-cart, with its shining tin cans. Between 
the clatter, clatter of her sabots and the snatches of joyous song, 
which rise like incense from her pure heart, we can hear the gentle 
admonitions with which she urges her shaggy steed to jog along a 
little faster over the cobble-stones. This intelligent animal occa- 
sionally blends his bass voice with her sweet treble in a deep sonor- 
ous ' ' bow-wow. 

The ' ' lady boot-blacks ' ' of France neatly dressed in an attire 
somewhat similar to that worn by the Sisters of Mercy, skillfully ply 
the brush with their gloved fingers until Monsieur' s trim boots 
rival in glossiness the shapely ' ' Oxford ' ' which has been duly 
" shined " by the smutty-faced little street gamin across the blue 
Atlantic. 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian . 3029 

The Chinese bride is forbidden to ride, walk or stand on her 
wedding-day, and is borne by persons of her own sex from her old 
home to the new. Professional bride-carriers are engaged for this 
purpose, and one who has gained a name for bringing good luck to 
the couple is certain to reap a rich harvest after her labor. 

Perhaps the strangest custom of all exists in Paraguay, where 
most of the butchers are clad in petticoats ! Many "loyal sons" 
were slain in the terrible struggle between that country and the 
combined armies of Paraguay, Uraguay an:l Argentina. Indeed, 
since that desperate war, which lasted five long years, the masculine 
population has been so small that women must necessarily perform 
many such distasteful services. 

Each day the truth is forcibly brought home to us that woman's 
hands are often busier than her tongue. 



Dramatizing the Novel. 

F M H L S 



Of course, it looks easy to dramatize the novel when we first 
think of it. There is the dialogue all ready for you and the char- 
acters all clearly drawn out by the novelists, and all you have to do 
is to put life into these paper dolls. But did you ever think how 
difficult that is. 

Now the greatest difficulty is to compress about three hundred 
pages of the novel into a performance of about two or three hours' 
duration. 

The man who adapts the play for the stage must, first of all, 
consult the author— not that the author knows anything at all of 
dramatic effects, but he always insists upon being consulted. 

The next people consulted are the scene-painters. They have 
the book read to them by the stage manager and make miniature 
settings of the play, which are sent to the stage manager for in- 
spection. 

Then comes the designer, the inventor of the costumes. Some 
people think that the individuals use their own judgment about their 
own dresses. Never ! At least not in a first-class production. 
Have you never seen in, we will say, a lower middle- class comic 



3030 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

opera company, a green cavalier in purple tights making love to a 
girl draped in yellow ? Yes, the color scheme must be preserved. 
The designer must be well versed in ancient and modern dressing, 
and must also be absolutely correct in historic detail. 

Now the stage curpenter is called. He is the builder. Just as 
the architect figures girders, posts, couplings, bolting and orders 
the same from Pittsburg to produce his sky-scraper, so does the 
stage carpenter set about his task, with the exception that he takes 
the raw material and makes his own girders, posts, couplings and 
so on. He is bricklayer, mason, joiner, plasterer and plumber, all 
in one. 

The property man is next. In him we find the most wonder- 
ful being connected with the stage. He is ready at all times to 
supply anything from a raspberry tart to an upright piano. 

Then the electrician is called. Perhaps you think he supplies 
only the footlights, the border lights and the calcium that is thrown 
from the front. These are the smallest parts of his work. The 
placing of his strip lights is of great importance in the lighting of 
the stage and the carrying out of the painter's idea properly. A 
strip light, to make it very plain, is a piece of wood of almost any 
length, on which several electric bulbs are placed to disperse 
shadows. 

Next on the programme is the musician who supplies the inci- 
dental music. The book has been read to him. His orchestra 
must wail wherever the play becomes ' ' waily. ' ' Where it becomes 
joyous he giggles with the piccolo. 

Now comes the dress rehearsal. Dress rehearsals are always 
depressing. The actors are nervons and miss their lines. The 
scenery works imperfectly and the mechanical effects work so badly 
that scenes appear ridiculou6. 

After the dress rehearsal a nervous day is spent, waiting for 
the next night when the play is to be given. 

The novelist is closely allied to the stage. Dumas has been 
seen in action. Potler's "Trilby" created as great an impression 
as Du Maimer's book. The "Little Minister" drew more money 
at the box office than that famous story did in the counting-room of 
the publishing house. 

' ' Quo Vadis ' ' has made such a favorable impression that peo- 
ple are actually learning how to pronounce the name Sienkiewicz. 
Whv can we not have a stage revival of Dickens ? 






The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3031 

To My Valentine. 



a. b g , 04 



On a winter's evening — oh, 't was years ago — 

I brought you a missive thro' the falling snow. 

A bit of scented paper, a fragment of lace, 

A tiny rosebud, a hand-painted face 

With a foolish verse. You promised to be mine ; 

My own, my true, my dearest, my only Valentine. 

'Tis another Winter's evening ; as of long ago 

I plod with a beating heart thro' the falling snow. 

The bit of scented paper, the fragment of lace 

Perished together with the hand-painted face ; 

Alas ! I stand empty-handed, pleading at your door — 

Grant me one boon, sweet maiden. I will ask no more ! 

Now, prithee, dear mistress, take, heal this aching heart- 

For 'tis sorely wounded by Cupid's cruel dart ! 

Say once again that you'll be mine, 

My own, my true, my dearest, my only Valentine. 



College Truths. 

A B G 



Lassies, lassies, -mo' lassies, 
Fun, frolic, quizzes, no passes ! 

A deacon's cloak, a senior's gown and charity — these three 

Are similar as similar as they can be ; 

They cover more than one sin, no doubt, 

And we know they keep others from popping out. 

Oh, wedding guest ! the Seniors have been 
On a trigometric sea : 
So lonely 'twas that flunking itself 
Seemed only there to be. 

Why is it that in Trig, exams the thermometer is affected so ? 
The characteristic is ever naught ; the mantissa falls — zei o ! 

— The Maids of the Cap and Gown need not fear the cold 
weather, nor need they mind when the fire goes out, because they 
have just received a fresh supply of ' ' logs. ' ' 



3032 



The Luterpean AisD The Hesperian. 



Why Frogs Have No Tails. 



E ARCHIBALD. '06 

Illustrated by Emma Greider. 




The fact that it was the Fourth of July stirred up 
no patriotic feeling in the heart of little Daffydown- 
dilly as he floated gaily over the warm fields on 
that sunny morning, for he was a dainty fairy and 
as happy and careless as fairies alone can be. The 
world was only a vast pleasure garden to him, and 
all that he cared to do was to enjoy it to the fullest 
extent, and to tease and laugh at any one that 
came his way. The morning was so bright and 
beautiful that he laughed aloud with pure delight 
as he pulled this grasshopper's leg or tickled that 

also a very michiev- 
h i s floating^ were 





little ant, for he was 
ous elf. Suddenly 
brought to a stop, as 
bunch of tiny fire- 
dry ditch by the 
ed up to them and 
them for a few minutes he picked 
two or three matches that were 
them, and, sticking them in his belt, 
gaily again as he floated out. 

"Look at that lazy frog!" he 
himself, as he spied the object of 
tion, sleeping peacefully on the bank of a tiny 
brook. 

Oh ! poor Mr. Frog, little did he know the 
trouble in store ! Daffydowndilly, after tying 
the fire-crackers to his long tail, wickedly light- 
ed them. 

"Bang! Bang!! Bang!!!" went the fire- 
crackers, and, with a hoarse cry, up jumped 
Mr. Frog, but, alas and al*ck ! his long tail was 
blown off ! That is why to this clay frogs have 
no tails ! 



he caught sight of a 
crackers lying in a 
roadside. He walk- 
after examining 
them up with 
close beside 
he laughed 

exclaimed t o 
h i s exclama- 




The Euterpf.an and The Hesperian 



3033 



Society fiotes anti Eorals. 



C.vMMIK LINDLEY 



— We are glad to let the public know what a success we, the 
members of the Hesperian Society, made of our Tea the afternoon 
and evening- of January the twenty-second. Everything was sold 
and the proceeds, which amounted to thirty-five dollars, will be- 
used for the benefit of the hall. 




2* >-_^^ '-t__ 



— Thursday's Cooking Class enjoyed very much having the- 
privilege of entertaining Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Wolle while Mr. 
Wolle was here to give us one of his famous organ recitals, with 
which we were all greatly pleased. 

— We are glad to add to our list of members six new names 
since Christmas. 

The good old winter time is what we had some days ago when 
the earth was clothed in her robes of white, but the way the girls 
wanted to stay out of doors one would think it was the good old 
summer time asain. 



3034 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

IHKljange department. 



C. L., '06 and B. T , '04. 



— We acknowledge receipt of the following : The Red and 
White, The Vale-Dean Budget, The Crimson, The Comenean, The 
Guilford Collegian, St. Edwards Echo, Mary Baldwin Miscellany, 
Davidson College Magazine , Linden Hall Echo, The Phonograph, 
The Hall Boy, The Decaturian, The Oraiige a?id Blue. 

— The Hall Boy is always a welcome visitor among our ex- 
changes. The illustrations in the January number are quite inter- 
esting notwithstanding the fact of the artist's toothache. We sym- 
pathize with him very much, and sincerely hope that ere now this 
most disagreeable of aches has left him alone with his drawing. 

— The December number of The Crimson is especially inter- 
esting. 

— We congratulate the Literary Societies of Guilford College 
in publishing such a splendid paper, The Guilford Collegian. 

— "Larina," in The Comenian is a very interesting and well 
written story of the time when Christians were so mercilessly purse- 
cuted by the Roman Church. 

— We are glad to know that our former Presidents, Miss Bes- 
sie Sloan, of the Euterpean, and Miss Amy R. Sloan, of the 
Hesperian, have not forgotten us, for they have sent us new ma- 
hogany gavels, of which we are very proud, and are glad to know- 
that they have a deep feeling of affection for their respective socie- 
ties. We wish to express our sincere appreciation of their gifts. 



— " Speaking of bathing in famous springs," said the tramp to 
a group of tourists, " I bathed in the Spring of '86.' : — Ex. 



In the Winter, when it's chilly, 
We imagine heat's sublime. 
But don't we change our notion, 
In the good old summer time. 

— Exchange. 



The Academy. 3035 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 

NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



A 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream Puffs, ~) 20 cts. Vanilla Wafers. ~) 10 cts. 

Crescents, > per Kisses, > per 

Cup Cakes, j dozen. Macaroons, J dozen 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 

Wwmww Cake Timm Mfea® 



3036 



The Academy. 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment oi rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs. Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds. Doskins. Broadcloths, and 
many others t.'at hnve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a st .ck that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others tnat will 
please the most exclusive and exac ing taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

• SOBOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy 3037 

1 O 2 d Y E A. "R 



$ALCm ACADGmY 

ADD COLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, IV, O. 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos k Comenius, and, through the four 
centuries of the Church's history, i s found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day. and parems who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ing of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The paiticularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
househpld arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared, 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which will 
bo sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



3038 The Academy. 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when you 
are in our store remember to look at our linelof 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair of them. 

ROSENBACHER'S 
DEPARTMENT STORES. 



The Academy. 



3039 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1794. 

SALEM, N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- VY riting. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogu3. 

JAS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 
YOU 
WANT 
THE 



THAT'S 
ALL 
THE 
GO ? 



IF 

SO 

SEE 

US 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOItTIEIS. 

J. L. JO^ES. lat<* of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best ibai the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



3040 The Academy. 

OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, W. C. 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBEE, 

TINNER, 
-CORNICE WORKER. 






THE ACADEMY. 



Vol. 27. Winston-Salem, N. C, March, 1904. No. 236. 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postofrice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



l£Tutortal. 

— The present number of The Academy will be received 
just before Easter. We feel sure that many friends in various sec- 
tianc will think of Salem at that time, and will be with us in spirit 
as we engage in the solemn services of Passion Week, or unite i'n 
the joyous festival of Easter Day. 



— The department in charge of the Literary Societies is again 
enlivened with a number of illustrations which do credit to the artis- 
tic skill of the members. The young ladies take great interest in 
their department, and we feel sure that our readers do the same. 



— The fire fiend has again accomplished its work of destruction 
in the midst of our North Carolina schools. Since our last number 
was printed the well known Greensboro Female College has been 
destroyed. This school is well known throughout the State, and 
the sympathy for those in charge is very deeply felt. 



3042 The Academy. 

— Because there hab been sorrow and loss in the case of several 
schools does not imply that the same sorrow will come to other 
schools in our State. Still special precautions have been taken by 
our authorities, and the safety which surrounds our pupils is greater 
than that of the protection even within the homes of the pupils. 



— When it was discovered that a few of the pupils within the 
school were experiencing some uneasiness because of the widespread 
discussion in regard to the recent losses to our neighboring schools, 
a conference was held with representatives from the various room 
companies, and the question vfas asked : "What can be done to 
dissipate your uneasiness, if uneasiness exists.'" The conference 
replied that if two watchmen are placed on duty instead of the one 
who is always on duty all will be well. Therefore, for the present, 
two watchmen patrol the premises, inside and out, each thirty min- 
utes during the night, and all are happy and satisfied. 

— in view of the widespread interest in the provisions for the 
safety of school property we think it right and proper to call atten- 
tion to the special care which Salem has always taken in the matter 
of fire protection. The provisions are such that in the entire town 
there have been only a few fires in the nearly one hundred and fifty 
years of its existence, and the school has been protected for more 
than a hundred years from any loss. Next to the Lord's blessing 
this is due to the almost perfect system of care and protection which 
exists. 



— After a very severe winter, in which the cold was continuous 
from November to March, the first approach of Spring is apparent 
in the songs of the birds, the fresh green upon the lawns", and the 
bursting buds upon the trees. Spring time is a happy season, sur- 
rounded as we are by the beauties of campus and park. 



— Preparations for resuming building operations on Alumnae 
Memorial Hall are being made, and, with the advent of Spring, the 
work will be energetically pushed forward. 



The Academy. 8043 

— Mr. C. B. Pfohl, the Academy representative, is at present 
in Texas, visiting the homes of present and former pupils. We feel 
sure he will receive a cordial welcome by our friends in the Lone 
Star State. 



— The special Instruction Class, which meets in the school 
parlors each Monday evening- in Lent, is very largely attended this 
year. The lectures are delivered by Bishop Rondthaler. 



— The Music Department has shown unusual activity this 
Spring. The special supervision of*the practice hours, and the zeal 
of the teachers together promise to produce marked results. , 

The Vesper Services. 



Earnest and profitable worship has always been a part of our 
school life. The former pupils frequently write and speak of the 
impressive services in the Home church, especially at Christmas and 
Easter. The special Wednesday hour, usually termed "young 
people's meetings," is a very profitable as well as enjoyable hour, 
while the morning chapel service of 15 minutes gives us a good start 
for the day. In addition to this the morning and evening devotion 
in the room company has its place in the deepening of the religious 
nature of the pupils. 

One of the services which has called for special interest this 
year is the Sunday Vesper service. This is held at five o'clock 
Sunday afternoon, just as the shadows of evening are beginning to 
gather. A brief account of the one held Sunday, March 6th, will 
serve as a type of all these happy occasions. 

The special programme was in charge of the members of Room 
Nine. They arranged the chapel platform, placed the splendid 
cluster of carnations beside the speaker's desk, and welcomed the 
guests as they arrived. 

The regular printed service was for Lent and Easter. Dr. 
Clewell conducted the exercises. A series of responsive readings 
setting forth the sufferings of the Messiah composed the first part of 
the service. Then followed a hymn for Pain Sunday, the tune being 



3044 The Academy. 

the well known and beautiful " Palms." Then the responsive read- 
ings depicted the sorrows of the Passion Week and the hymn was 
the solemn choral : 

" O sacred head, now wounded." 

This part of the printed service was closed by chanting the 
Lord's prayer, the music used being the arrangement by Warner. 

Then followed the special programme, consisting of a solo by 
Miss Morrison, a brief but earnest address by Bishop Rond- 
thaler, and a hymn sung by the members of Room Nine. 

Then the company united in the closing part of the liturgical 
service, which brought out the joys of Easter day. The hymn was 
" Welcome happy morning." 

The beauty of these Vesper services is enhanced by the plans 
of the special room companies selected to assist the Principal in the 
preparations. Each room company has in turn assisted. 

Among the speakers who have been with us during the past 
weeks are : Bishop Rondthaler, Revs. Mallinkrodt, Crosland', 
Turner, Pfohl and Col Fries. The music has been enriched by the 
assistance of Prof. Shirley and his organ and piano pupils, by Miss 
Morrison and a number of her pupils, and by members of the 
Sunday School orchestra and other friends. 

Altogether the Sunday Vesper services have been an enjoyable 
part of the year's devotional life, and we feel that w r hen the spirit of 
reverence is strong in the heart of a young woman she will not only 
be a blessing to herselt but also to those about her. 



— The members of the Cooking School are having "quizes" 
in the form of a 3 or 4 course luncheon, which must be prepared 
without the assistance, or even the presence of Miss Wolle, and 
the luncheon is then served to several friends, pupils or members of 
the Faculty. We were privileged to attend one of these occasions, 
and we can say from observation that the ' ' quiz ' ' was a marvelous 
success, and the pupils deserve a " 100 " mark. 



— We were glad to welcome Mr. Farrish, of Columbus, Ga. , 
who spent a day with Mary, on his return from a visit to his son at 
the University cf Virginia. 



The Academy 3045 

COMMENCEMENT, 1904. 



As the close of the school-year approaches the mind naturally 
turns towards the plans and preparations for the Commencement 
Exercises. These are so far settled as to enable us to give an out- 
line of the days, though, of course, many details still remain to be 
arranged. The Seniors have held a number of meetings to discuss 
this occasion, and the school officials have had the Commencement 
interests before them for some time past. 

The date decided upon is Sunday, May 22d, to Wednesday, 
May 25th. 

The Baccalaureate Sermon will be delivered on Commence- 
ment Sunday, May 22d, in the Salem Home Church, by the Rev. 
H. F. Chreitzberg, D. D. , of Centenary M. E. Church, Winston. 
Dr. Chreitzberg is an orator of acknowledged eminence, and has 
always felt a warm interest in our work. . We feel happy in having 
secured his consent to preach the sermon on Commencement 
Sunday. 

Monday will be Seniors' Day, when their special Class Exer- 
cises will take place. These plans are not yet complete, and will 
be announced in our April number. 

Tuesday will be given over to the Alumnae, for their social 
and business meetings. 

Monday night and Tuesday night will be in charge of the 
Music and Elocution Departments. 

Wednesday, May 25th, will be Commencement Day. The 
exercises will be held in the morning, and it gives us special pleas- 
ure to announce that the orator of the occasion will be the Rev. 
William J. Holland, LL. D. , of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, 
Penna. There are three reasons why Dr. Holland's presence will 
be particularly welcome on this happy occasion : first. Because he is 
aiuorator of acknowledged ability, and hence will supply what is 
specially needed to make the day a pleasing success ; in the second 
place, Dr. Holland has attained to national and even international 
eminence as a scholar, not only in his special line as a scientist, but 
as a successful worker in various fields ; and, finally, we are glad to 
welcome Dr. Holland to Winston-Salem because 40 years ago he 
resided in our community as a youth, and his many friends of ear- 



3046 The Academy. 

lier years will be glad to greet their former associate who has earned 
so many laurels in the intellectual world. 

The Senior Class this year numbers thirty-two, the following 
being the list : 

Emma Aird, Julia Barnard, Corinne Baskin, Nellie 
Buford, Louise Crist, Ruth Crist, Mary Culpepper, Emma 
Foust, Lily Farish, Ruby Follin, Agnes Belle Goldsby\ 
Emma Greider, Mary Gudger, Frank Hanes, Eva Harris, 
Nataline Hanes, Connie Hege, Alma King, Eliza Knox, 
Grace Leslie, Elsie Louhoff, Ruby McCorkle, Glenn 
McDonald, Ruth Matthews, Margaret Mickle, Frances 
Powers, Lula Stipe, Florence Stockton, Brietz Thom, 
Bessie Warren, Mary Watlington, Julia Wilson. 

Thus it will be seen that very careful work has been done to 
make the 102d Annual Commencement of Salem Academy and 
College a pleasant and at the same time a successful occasion. 



Death of Dr. E. A. de Schweinitz. 

Dr. E. A. de Schweinitz, head of the U. S. Bio-Chemic De- 
partment, Washington, D. C, died after a brief illness, and his 
body was laid to rest beneath the cedars in the beautiful Moravian 
graveyard in Salem. 

In the death of Dr. de Schweinitz not only do we lose a dis- 
tinguished townsman, but the country and the world loses a scien- 
tist of the first rank. Already Dr. de Schweinitz was recognized as 
an authority on those topics which he made his special study, and 
the world will be blessed in many ways by the relief which his dis- 
coveries will bring to suffering humanity. As it is we can well be 
proud of the achievements of our townsman, even though he passed 
away at the comparatively early age of 88 years, but the mind nat- 
urally asks, if riiis much was done at the age of 38 how much more 
might have been accomplished if an All-wise Providence had seen 
fit to allow him to work in his chosen field of scientific research for 
another score of years. 



The Academy. 3047 

FROM ALUMNjE AND OTHER FRIENDS. 

All communications for this Department should he addressed ti Thk Acadkmy, Wi'iston- 
Salem, N, C Teachers, as well as friemls residing in the towns are invited t-> send us letters 
fr"m former pupils, or from othtr friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



— Our first letter is from a friend who has made her home in a 
distant State on the Pacific Coast, but who seems to cherish fond 
feelings of affection for her school-home : 

"The uninterrupted coming- of The Academy has been a 
great pleasure to me ; I think I have every copy on file, and I have 
the picture of the buildings and grounds framed and hanging in our 
living-room down stairs ; I often tell our two and a half year old 
baby girl of Salem. 

" We came almost as far west in this country as we could ; we 
like it here, have mild winters and delightful summers. If you ever 
decide to come out into this part of the west we will be delighted to 
see you in Spokane. I will certainly come by Salem if I ever see 
that I can. It is a great pleasure to think of my three years at 
S. F. A. , and so does my sister Agnes delight to speak of her 
seven years spent in Salem. 

' ' I am sorry to have neglected to have sent my subscription to 
The Academy. I think it is $2.00 I owe, and I also send 50 cents 
for the next year ; I would like to have you send me a copy of the 
History of Wachovia in North Carolina, and for all this I enclose the 
sum of $4.50. 

"Remember me to Mrs. Clewell, Dr. Rondthaler, Miss 
Lehman, Mr. Pfohl, and all the teachers who remember me. 
With best wishes. 

" Mamie Johnston Trunkey ( 1892-95)." 

2109 Fourth St. , Spokane, Washington. 

— Our next letter is from a friend of earlier days; but the spirit 
of affection is just as warm and strong, as appears in the com- 
munication : 

" If you will refer to the catalogues of 1853 to 1858 you will 
find the name of Mary E. Wilkes, among the Ws from Holmes 
Co., Mississippi. I was placed there at 11 and left at 16 ; was placed 
in 10th Room, with Misses H. D. Schnall and Carrie Siewers. 



3048 The Academy. 

"In all these years my love and loyalty for my dear Alma 
Mater have never grown less. I have raised two sons and one 
daughter ; and they each believe that Salem Academy and Col- 
lege is the acme of all things desirable ; and though I have never 
gone back to the shrine of my early love, my prayer is for her 
prosperity. 

' ' I have spent my life in teaching ; will be 60 years of age on 
May 7th, and as I write these lines, my only daughter, Miss Ewing 
Drake, is giving a music lesson in an adjoining room. 

" I was a pupil of Misses Warner, Amy Vleck, Emma L. 
Lineback and Prof. E. W. Lineback. Other faithful teachers 
whom I can never forget were Misses H. D. Schnall, Carrie 
Siewers, Stauber and Denke, as well as others whom I might 
mention. 

" Rev. Robert deSchweinitz was Principal. How we loved 
him ! And the Misses Hermann I must not omit. Dear Miss 
Addie ! how patiently she taught me my French and German ! 

" I received The Academy for several years, and Miss Maria 
Vogler used occasionally to write to me ; but in the lapse of these 
drifting years, one loses the touch of the loving hands. Publish 
this letter in your Salem paper, dear Dr. Clewell ; this leaf from 
the garland of buried years, so that this love-greeting may perchance 
reach all those for whom my heart yearns. If Georgia Sanders 
Graham, of Kershaw, S. C. , should see this, (or any of the others) 
she will understand. May God bless and crown my Alma Mater, 
and all interested in her welfare is my fervent prayer. 

' ' A tender greeting to all officers, teachers and students, past 
and present. 

" Respectfully, 

"Mrs. Drake Howard, 
(nee Mary E. Wilkes)." 

Durant, Miss. 



— Bishop Rondthaler visited Charleston, S. C. , and preached 
in the historic old Second Presbyterian Church, and addressed a 
great gathering assembled under the auspices of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. He speaks of the warm hospitality of the 
Charleston people. 



The Academy. 3049 

(ttijnmicle attti i&oissip. 



— Mary Watlington returned, March 7th, from a sad visit 
home, having been called thither by the death of her father. Flor- 
ence and Corinna Moorman returned a few days earlier, having 
suffered the loss of their grandfather. Our sympathy was called 
forth for Mary Gaither, whose beloved grandmother passed away 
during the last weeks, and Miss Bessent also has had the shadows 
of sorrow thrown across her pathway. To the above list others 
might be added who because of sickness or death within the home 
circle have had aching hearts. 

— During the past month there have been several changes in 
the room company life. Miss Ackerman resigned room duty in 
the "Eighth Room in order to devote all her time to Elocution, and 
Miss Carrie Vest succeeds her as Eighth Room teacher. Miss 
Ida Wharton takes room duty in the Junior Room, and Miss 
Kate Kilbuck, returned from Kansas to Salem, assumes duties in 
the Tenth Room. 

— We noted with regret the death of Miss Caroline E. Ser- 
vice, at St. Phillips' Home, Charleston, S. C. , on February 24, 
1904. She was born on the Island of Barbadoes, West Indies, in 
1826. She was educated at Bethlehem, Pa., and Salem and taught 
in the Academy at two different times, from 1859 to 1860, and later 
in the beginning of 1870. She was a lady of genuine refinement 
and culture, and greatly esteemed here and in Charleston where 
she spent her declining years. 



HISTORICAL ITEMS. 
1895. 



Euterpean Society Play, " A Dress Rehearsal," January, 1895. 

Dr. Griggs, an eminent singer of New York, visited Salem, 
and gave a Vocal Recital before the School, January, 1895. 

Vance Memorial Window placed in position, February, 14. 
Gift by Class of '94 and other friends, 1895. 

The street between the church and Principal's house greatly 
improved ; also the pavement in front of the house, February, 1895. 



3050 The Academy. 

Death of Miss Helen Bell in Philadelphia, February, 1895. 

Box of Curios received from Alaska, for our museum, from 
Mrs. Kilbuck, March, 1895. 

Hesperian Entertainment, "The Lost Will," March, 1895. 

The Wachovia Moravian enlarged to an eight page Journal, 
March, 1895. 

Dr. Bahnson delivered his lecture describing the last days of 
the war, before the Academy pupils and faculty, March, 1895. 

Rev. and Mrs. Ziock and Rev. and Mrs. Schubert, missionaries 
on their way to Central America, visited Salem, April, 1895. 

A Cooking Club, with a large membership from the town, has 
been organized by ladies from the town, Miss Grace Wolle as Di- 
rector, April, 1895. 

A Historical Society was organized in Salem, March, 1895. 

Reidsville Local Alumnae Society organized April 30, 1895, at 
the home of Mrs. F. R. Penn. 

An Operetta, "The Twin Sisters," under Miss Tracy's direc- 
tion, given for the benefit of the Alumnae Association, April, 1895. 

Brownie Concert, given for benefit of Elm Street Sunday School. 

Commencement, 1895. Sermon by Bishop J. J. Cheshire, D. 
D. Oration by Mr. James M. Beck, of Philadelphia. Hon. J. C. 
Buxton delivered the address before the Alumnae Association. Art 
Exhibit unusually large. Mrs. Z. B. Vance present at the presen- 
tation of the Vance Memorial Window. 

An edition of 50,000 copies of The Academy printed this 
year, June, 1895. 

Bishops Buchner and Romig and Rev. E. A. Oerter visited 
Salem in May, 1895. 

The Class of 1895 decided to erect a large pipe organ in the 
chapel as their Memorial, and have started a subscription with that 
end in view. The School supplied what additional funds were 
needed. 

Alumnae Scholarship Fund has now reached $2,700, June, 1895. 

At least 20,000 words were telegraphed to the various papers 
during Commencement in regard to the exercises, June, 1895. 

Annual Banquet of Literary Societies, May, 1895. 

Senior and Junior Reception, May, 1895. 



THE EUTERPEAN. 

AND 

THE HESPERIAN. 



This department is devoted to the combined interests of the 
Euterpean and Hesperian Literary Societies 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Agnes Belle Goldsby, E. L. S. ) o,,..^ • r . ■ r 

Florence Moorman, H. L. S. } Editors-in-Chief. 

Mary B. Gudger, E. L. S. | 

Frances Poweks, E L. S. \ Assistant Editors. 

Cammie Lindley, H. L. S. J 

Helen M. Blandford, E. L. S. It...... i?a^ 

Ora Hunter, H. L. S. } Llterar y Kd,tors - 

Carrie Levy, E. L. S. 1 t- , t?. . 

Brietz Thom, H. L. S. \ Excha1 ^ Edltors - 

CORINNE BASKIN, E. L. S. Id- i\/i 

d,t TI . ^,,r-, ^^ u t c } Business Managers. 

KUbHA bHERKOD, H. JL b. J to 

Emma B Greider, E. L. S. ) » - 

Ora Hunter, H. L. S. j Art,sts 



iSUitorial. 



' ' The stormy March is come at last, 
With wind, and cloud, and changing skies ; 
I hear the rushing of the blast, 
That through the snowy valley flies. 



— The fair sex will doubtless be interested to learn that Uncle 
Sam is cultivating a beauty plant in the experimental farm at Wash- 
ington. The women of Algeria eat the seeds of this plant to 
make themselves beautiful and the government experts are endeav- 



3052 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

oring to discover what grounds they have for their faith in this 
miraculous vegetable.. Its virtues are, perhaps, purely superstitious 
ones and girls had better take plenty of exercise, eat ' ' lots of bread 
and hash ' ' and cease considering other beauty foods. We know 
from experience that bright eyes and good complexions are to be 
found where these are indulged in with freedom. 



— We enjoyed the tiniest taste of Spring just before February 
bade us adieu, but then she departed, all wrapt in a snowy mantle 
and blustering March came in like a .roaring lion. If the old maxim 
tells the truth this first month of Spring will make his exit as meek 
as a lamb and we may expect a glorious Easter — all sunshine and 
flowers ! 



The First Note of Spring. 



A B G. 



The leafless boughs quiver and quake, 
While the bitter wind blows chill — 
The shrunken shrubs shiver and shake ; 
The icy stream scarce turns the mill. 
The rugged mountains bleak and drear, 
Downward gaze with scowling mien 
Upon the valley brown and sere, 
Stript of its wonted verdant sheen. 
The heav'ns are stained a leaden grey, 
As if the gloomy shades of night 
Pursued the fleeting god of day 
And o'er shadowed its golden light. 

List ! from the tattered hedge of thorn 

Surges a flood of joyous song ! 

A shiv'ring minstrel lone and lorn, 

His blithesome carol doth prolong. 

The warbler, swaying to and fro, 

Pours from his tiny, swelling throat 

A trill — a wondrous crescendo — 

How pure, how sweet, how clear each note ! 

Welcome, thrice welcome, shy singer, 

Gladsome the tidings thou dost bring : 

Fold thy wings and prithee linger ; 

Thou'st sounded the first note of Spring ! 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



305 3 



A Peep Within Our Alma Mater. 



A. B G , 04 



Illustrated by Emm\ Grkider. 

It is a beautiful afternoon in early 
Spring — the very day for visitors ! We 
will be delighted to let you peep at our 
school home. Suppose we stop just a 
minute in the Square opposite the Acad- 
emy. Behold our Alma Mater ! For 
more than a hundred years she has 
reared her head among the hills of the 
' ' Old North State, ' ' and may the next 
century find her protecting walls still 
shielding fair maidenhood from the 
rough storms of the outside world ! 

The clustering ivy that clings so 
tenderly to the huge stone pillars on the 
portico is a living memorial of those 
Maids of the Cap and Gown, who have 
placed Horace's well worn coat on the 
shelf beside battered old Virgil, and 
have already entered upon the duties of 
maturer life. 

The two stately plants, which stand 
like sentinels on either side of the front 
entrance, are much beloved by the girls, 
who like to gather after supper ' ' ' neath 
the sheltering palm " and talk and talk until the " horrid old bell '' 
rings for study hour. 

We have reached the South Junior Room. The many pictures, 
bric-a-brac and flowers add- greatly to its attractiveness and coziness,. 
do they not ? The Juniors gather here at night to struggle with 
Latin and bemoan the fact that there is indeed no royal road to 
Geometry. The apartment to the north is also occupied by mem- 
bers of this self-same class. 

The Fifth and Sixth Rooms are just across the hall. You. 
haven't time to visit the other room companies. 




•3054 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



We will hurry upstairs, merely glance 
at the Senior's " bower " and then journey 
toward the Library. If we should keep 
on climbing, flight after flight, past the 
dormitories, we would finally reach the 
Studio, where Art reigns supreme under 
the blue eye of heaven. 

We have a goodly store of books in 
our Reading Room, still we hear the in- 
cessant cry — " more, more !" 

The next point of interest is the Chapel. 
Here we unite each morning in a brief ser- 
vice before entering the class room. The 
exquisite oil painting near the organ — 
Hoffman's '"Christ in the Temple"' — was 
presented by the Class of 1901. 

You wish to see the dining-room ? Cer- 
tainly, you may. Be careful of that last 
step, — here we are ! 

You never saw so many tables in all 
your life ? Should the dinner bell ring, I 
daresay you would wonder from whence 
so many girls suddenly appeared to give 
life and animation to the scene. 
Now let us direct our steps toward Society Hall. Which room 
do you think is the prettier ; the Hesperian, with its nicely polished 
hardwood floor, new piano and purple draperies, or the Euterpean, 
with the handsome officers' chairs, painted ceiling, soft carpet and 
rich blue hangings? You can't decide? Well, let us tell you a 
little secret. When a Hesperian is your guide you had better speak 
highly of the former ; but, should vour companion be an Euterpean, 
sing the praises of the latter Hall, then you will always be on the 
safe side of the question. 

The play-grounds are damp from the rain last night, so we will 
not risk getting our feet wet just to taste the water from the pictur- 
esque old spring-house. You can imagine how prettv it is down 
there, with the tall trees, trailing vines and the merry, babbling 
brook, spanned by a rustic bridge. If you will come some day 




The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3055 

when the grass is quite dry and the hillsides all white with daisies 
we may enjoy its beauties together. 

The building across the Campus is Annex, where the little girls 
live. Back of that are the Laboratory and Infirmary. See the 
tender green shoots on the weeping willow ! Later on our fountain 
will rival in beauty the famous Pons Bandnsia. 

Must you leave already / You have caught the merest glimpse 
of our dear old College ! No, indeed, trains surely do not wait for 
any man. 

We are glad to have made your acquaintance, sir. Be sure to 
come back for Commencement. Good-bye ! 




Among the Hills. 

ANNIE PAGE JONES. 



The teacher hearing a cry from one of the girls, walked to the 
window. 

"Look down there, Miss Kenneth, by the creek," and the 
girl pointed in the direction of the conflict which she was reporting. 

" Is it a real fight? " asked the teacher wearily. 

" Yes 'm," replied the child with a rising inflection of the voice 
peculiar to the children of the hills, an accent which is unmistakable 
and which always betrays the origin of the speaker. 

The teacher moved slowly to the front of the room, and taking 
up her overshoes from under the table where she had placed them 
for safe-keeping, she leisurely put them on, threw a fascinator over 
her head, and started in the direction of "the fight." 

The ground was covered with snow and the creek was half 



3056 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

frozen over. Even as she went to quell the riot, Miss Kenneth 
could not help admiring the wonderfully beautiful scene, and she 
turned to look back. She was an East- Virginian and this was one 
of the most picturesque of all the mountainous counties of the State. 
Behind her sat the little log schoolhouse on the slope of a pine-clad 
mountain. In front the hill sloped toward the creek. Across on 
the other side arose a steep and rugged cliff covered with spruce, 
ivy and laurel, and underneath the snow, pure and glistening, shone 
through the rich green of their foliage. 

She took this all in as she walked, and yet she saw and realized 
that two of her boys were fighting. Like the old woman who was 
watching the fight between her husband and the bear, she did not 
care much which whipped for she knew that it was nothing serious, 
but she also knew that it was her duty to stop them. She appre- 
hended no imminent danger of a commission of murder. 

"Timber Ridge" (his real name was Wood Ridgely ) was 
down on the snow with his coat off and Stanley Colton was kneeling 
on him with a hand on each arm. He was powerless to move and 
lay there seemingly engrossed in what Stanley was saying to him. 

Miss Kenneth stopped on a ledge of rock which marked the 
limit of the school yard and called to the boys but they seemed not 
to hear her. She stood and looked at them a moment and smiled. 
It had all been new and strange to her a few months ago and 
while she still to some extent enjoyed the curious, rough life of the 
mountains, some days she felt weary of it all, and the only interest 
even her school now afforded her from day to day was speculation 
as to what new experience was in store for her. 

Nothing could surprise or shock her now. Her brain no longer 
received impressions of wonder and astonishment, and everything 
that happened was taken as a matter of course. The sun was warm 
but the air was so crisp that, like the atmosphere of the Alps, it 
did not thaw the snow but was delightfully dry and bracing. 

' ' How much longer will he keep him there ? ' ' she wondered. 

Stanley was talking — extorting a promise it seemed. 

" An' the fish trap? : ' said Stanley. 

" Yes," said Timber. 

" ' N the eagle's claws ? ' ' 

"Yes." 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3057 

" ' N ' the pole-cat skin ? " • 

" The one I caught las' Sadday ? " 

' ' Yes. ' ' 

" I dun no. " 

' ' But ye got ter. ' ' 

" Well mebby so." 

' ' No mebby about it ! Say ' yes sir, Marster. ' 

" Yesser — marster," reluctantly. 

" ' N ' the picter ? ' ' 

" Stan, do' ax me fer that." 

"Yes, Tim, ye know all's fair in love an' war,' an' ye know 
this is war. Gimme the picter." 

" I ain't had it but two days." 

" That ain't nuthin'. Gimme the pictur. " 

" Won't ye take the coonskin cap instid er the photy graph? " 

1 ' I want the photy graph. ' ' 

' ' Well — I guess ye kin have it. ' ' 

' ' Let me up, Stan. My back is nigh froze. " 

The boys arose and they both laughed and repaired to the 
creek where they performed their ablutions and after drying their 
hands on their handkerchiefs, they turned and walked past the 
teacher in the direction of the school-house, laughing and chatting 
like the best of friends. 

'• Boys, were you fighting? " she asked. 

"No ma'am," was the reply. 

Turning about, the teacher faced a crowd of little girls and a 
few boys standing on another ledge of rock and who had, like her- 
self, been silent spectators of the scene. 

' ' They was fightin, ' ' ventured a little girl timidly. 

' ' What was the cause of it ? " the teacher asked. 

"Stanley cussed Polly Ridgely and Timber took it up, and 
then Stanley and Timber fit," replied the child glibly. 

"But Polly cussed Stanley first" said Stanley's little sister 
timidly. 

' ' O Polly ! ' ' exclaimed the teacher, too much shocked to say 
more, but mentally congratulating herself that this was the next to 
her last day at that school. 

With a few words of reproof she passed on. When she reached 



3058 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

the school house she sat down on the step in the sunshine and put 
her face in her hands. But her reverie was soon interrupted by 
another interesting scene. Timber ran down out of the school- 
house past her and joined Stanley who was partially hidden from 
view by a laurel bush close by. 

" Here's the photy graph, Stanley," he said as he thrust into 
his hand a well-known tin type which had at some time during the 
session been the coveted possession of every boy in school the orig- 
inal of which was the acknowledged belle of the school. 

" I'll bring ye the hides' n things termorrer," he said and his 
voice shook a little as he bravely added -:-- 

' ' I hated like the very wild to give ye the picter at first, Stan, 
but when I went in the schoolhouse just now and seed her castin' 
sheep's eyes at Bill Blake I didn't mind s'much. I do' keer no- 
how ! Gearls is fools if they think us boys keer, ain't they Stanley ?" 

And yet some people contend that there is no sentiment to be 
found among the hills. 

New Store, Va. 



in the land of hearts. 

Hearts surely were trumps that night ! Hanging from the 
familiar walls of the Gym, twined around the posts, fluttering from 
the great curtain which screened off the platforms ! Hearts of every 
size welcomed the Seniors in the name of their master Cupid and 
his faithful followers, the sophs. Bewitched by so many symbols 
of love these same Seniors found little if any difficulty in pouring 
forth their devotion in impromptu valentines, in which true feeling 
triumphed over the cut and dried rules of poetic composition. 

Even the dainty cakes which accompanied the ices paid tribute 
to St. Valentine, and added the finishing touch to this delightful 
festival of hearts. 

— On February 19th, in the Euterpean Hall, the question: 
" Is Co-education Beneficial or Not?" was hotly discussed by Misses 
Leslie and Goldsby on the affirmative and Misses Parker and 
Levy on the negative side. The contest was a close one. We 
congratulate the two latter young ladies on having convinced the 
majority of their auditors to regard the question as they do. 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



3059 



Shadows, 
w. o. h., '05. 



Great big' shadows nod and beckon 

When I goes to bed, — 

'Taint no harm in 'em, I reckon, 

That's what nurse has said. 

But when she has turned the gas down 

And the fire is low, 

Then these shadows come and walk 'round 

Jest as soft and slow. 




There I stand and watch and listen, 

'Cause I do not mind, 

Yet their eyes do shine and glisten, 

But they're not unkind, 

Soon they come and stand beside me, 

Sort of funny-like ; 

(Makes my heart jest thump inside me) 

And they look so white. 



3060 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



Then these things they tells me stories, 

Of all they have seen, 

Of old knights and kings and glories, 

And of many a queen. 

There they stand and talk and wiggle, 

Till I'm most asleep : 

Back without a single giggle 

To their place they creep. 




All these tales they tell are fables, 

And they all are mixed, 

More than multiplication tables, 

Simply won't get fixed. 

Oft I call each knight some letter 

But that ain't much fun, 

'Cause this don't make it much better, 

Guess I'm sle-ep-y s-o-m-e. 




ZZZT _ -^ZT. _&'!&■ 



Ob 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3061 

gocietg ijlotes anti Eocate. 



M. B. G. AND F P. 



Hip ! hip ! hurray ! for the girls of the good old Sixth Room 
and their unparalleled Tacky Party ? Pleasant surprises showered 
upon us that evening from the first moments when, on following 
the directions, we made our way to the old Gym, only to find that 
it had vanished, and that in its stead a genuinely unquestionably 
barn had sprung up. 

Need I tell you the warmth of our reception by the Salem 
lamb, and its cordial blink at us as, one by one, we filed by in 
speechless admiration ? Need I take up in detail those rustic cos- 
tumes which sent thrills of delight up our backs, — those gorgeous 
mixtures of purple and yellow ; those imposing head gears a la hay- 
seed, those robust, slightly corpulent figures? Surely these images, 
like the colors in our friend Ezekial Obediah's garments, can never 
fade ! Never before, in private nor in public life, had we been con- 
fronted with such victuals. What though pickles and lemonaade 
do not ordinarily agree ? Were we to be at a mixed party, in mixed 
garments and not to eat mixed food ? We smiled indulgently at 
those who protested as we went calmly on with our alternate bits of 
baked beans and peppermint. 

When all was over, when we had danced until even our clod- 
hoppers were giving way, when the capacious lemonade tubs were 
empty, the first unpleasant feature of the evening happened, — it 
struck ten, and we suddenly realized that we really weren't tacky 
at all ! 

— We all rejoice in Bessie Bowden's rapid improvement. 
Though we hate to bid her au > evoir, we trust that she will soon be 
strong enough to return to her home in dear old Alabama. 

— The Juniors were glad to welcome Helen Blandford back 
last month, but we also regret to say that she was only able to stay 
with us a week. Her injury has indeed proven a serious one. Her 
friends sincerely hope that the fractured knee-cap will soon be 
mended and be "as good as new ' ' once again. 



3062 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

— The members of the Euterpean Society, her classmates and 
friends, extend their heartfelt sympathies to Mary Watlington in 
her recent bereavement. 



CAMMIE LINDLEY. 

— We are sorry to note that on account of the death of their 
grandfather, Florence and Corrinna Moorman had to go home, 
but we are glad they have returned. 

— The members of the Hesperian Society are glad to have 
Miss Kilbuck, a former member, back in our midst as a member 
of the Faculty, and we hope that she will feel at home in the 
Society. 

— Miss Johnston was called home on account of sickness last 
month. 

— We are glad to say that Miss Thomas is able to be with us 
again after her long absence, caused by sickness. 



The Undivine Comedy. 

PARADISE. 

A shaded room, 

An open fire, 

A cozy nook 

And your heart's desire. 

purgatory. 

The self- same room, 
With lights afew, 
The self-same nook, 
With Ma there too. 

inferno. 

The room, the shade, 
The nook, the fire : 
The blessed chance, 
And enter sire ! 

— Selected. 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian 



3063 



SSrcljange Department. 

C L , '06 .Hid B. T , '04 




The following are the Exchanges received : 
Vail-Deane Budget, Guilford Collegian, William ]\ r oods Col- 
lege Record, The Criterion, St. Edzvards College, Echo, The Weekly 
Columbian, Doane Owl, Red and White, The Comenian, Linden Hall 
Echo, Hall Boy, Crimson, Getty sburgian, The Phonograph, The 
Decaturian, The Raysonian, Red, White and Blue, Davidson Col- 
lege Magazine. 

— The Hall Boy made the remark that The Academy has no 
exchange column, but if he would look carefully in turning the pages 
he certainly would find one, perhaps not quite so large as his own. 
He will please consider that a paper as other things requires time 
in which to grow. 

— " A Visit Abroad," in Linden Hall Echo is quite entertaining. 

— The February number of the Red and White is very good. 

— The Comenian is always a welcome visitor among our exchanges. 



3064 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

— The Doane Owl contains an interesting sketch on the char- 
acter of Desdemon. 

— The Vail-Dean Budget is a bright and attractive little paper. 
— The Criterion is a very neatly gotten-up magazine. 

Concerning the Struggle Between Russia and Japan. 



H. M B. 



In most vigorous fashion the war between Russia and Japan 
was opened by a topedo attack on the Russian fleet off Port Arthur. 
After the millions Russia spent in fortifying this port we can only 
think that she showed a degree of carelessness in allowing the Jap- 
anese to crawl in and destroy her three most useful vessels. From 
the audacity with which Japan has struck her initial blow, we can 
see how thoroughly she has been preparing for this great war, yet 
no one could detect the slightest evidence of the pomp and circum- 
stance of war. The Japs have always been a quiet, thrifty people, 
never making any public demonstration, and what people could 
have emerged into modern life so quickly and effectuallv as they ? 

Japan is a sailor as well as a soldier nation, and her power on 
the sea has been proved. The picturesque inland sea of Japan has 
already become famous to Western peoples, but as an ideal naval 
base no one has yet estimated its value. 

Korea itself amounts to little, but the importance of the ports 
belonging to it can not be over-estimated, and the result of the war 
will affect many nations. Japan cared little about Manchuria, but 
as regards Korea she was firm, and although an agreeable settle- 
ment was trying to be made, she was not idle in her preparations 
to strike .the giant foe. Japan could not allow Russia to hold ports 
so near her own land. 

Japan, a democratic and progressive nation has been calm in 
her bearing of such exasperating treatment from despotic Russia, 
but since the war has begun every Japanese looks forward with 
dauntless courage to laying down his life for his beloved native land. 
No doubt Japan has asserted her supremacy on the seas, and we are 
positive she will stand the test when the forces meet on land. 

Russia was not discouraged by what she termed the outrageous 
attack made by Japan without a declaration of war, but only seemed 
more enthusiastic in her patriotism. The War Minister is sure of 
success with the land forces, but on land, as on water, Japan is 
ready, and all on-looking nations favor the Japs. 



The Academy. 



3065 



POSITIVE 



GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 



COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 

NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 






mmm 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream Puffs, ~) 20 cts. 
Crescents, > per 
Cup Cakes, j dozen. 



Vanilla Wafers. ~) 10 cts. 
Kisses, >= per 

Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 



m 



3066 



The Academy. 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment of rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of ours- Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Dcskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others tnat have a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a stock that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all w ho appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck. Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others tnat will 
please the most exclusive and exacting taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOEOSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy 306^ 



§ALGm ACADGIDY 

ADD (JOLLGGG 

WINSTON-SALEM, IV, C- 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos Comenius, and, throngh the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day. and parents who commit their children to the care of the School are always 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ng of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared, 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which wiTj 
be sent on applicatiqn. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



3068 



The Academy. 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED IT94 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogue;. 

JAS. F. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



WANT 
THE 
SHOE 
THAT'! 




IP 
SO 

SEE 
US 



B 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CTOZfcTZES. 

J. L. JOXES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best ihat the market affords. We aie anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Sa'em Female Academy. 



The Academy. 3069 

NEW FALL AND WINTER 

DRESS GOODS. 



We have one of the 



we have ever brought to the city. 
We have many of the 

NEW NOVELTIES AND WEAVES 



that will be worn this season, and will take great 
pleasure in showing them to you ; and when vou 
are in our store remember to look at our line of 



LADIES' FINE SHOES. 

UTZ & DUNN'S SHOES can't be beat and we 
guarantee every pair oi them 



ROSENBACHERS 
DEPARTMENT STORES.. 



3070 The Academy. 

OUR SPECIALTIES: 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLER & SON, 

WINSTON- SALEM, 2V". C. 



L. B. BF 



y JELB M I 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 



THE ACADEMY. 



Vol. 27. Winston-Salem, N. C, April, 1904. No. 237 



Entered as second-class matter in the Postoffice at Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents per year. Devoted 
to the interests of Salem Academy and College ; the Alumnae Society 
of Salem Academy and College; the Euterpean and Hesperian Socie- 
ties. All subscriptions and communications should be addressed to The 
Academy, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 



lETntortal. 



— The next number of The Academy will be printed imme- 
diately after Commencement, and will appear early in June. It will 
be what is usually termed the ' ' May-June ' ' number. Special efforts 
are being put forth to make this number unusually attractive. 



■^The Easter services brought a very large number of visi- 
tors to our towns, and there was the usual anxiety in regard to the 
weather, since a period of unfavorable weather does much to detract 
from the social as well as the religious enjoyment. As it was the 
weather was all that could have been desired, and hence the many 
visitors as well as our home people were happy in the pleasures 
which accompany this holy season. 



— The programme of the Commencement occasion seems to 
give great satisfaction as it has been arranged. The speakers could 
not have been selected with greater care. The time has been re- 
duced to the lowest possible limit, and every one looks forward with 
pleasant anticipations to the approaching closing exercises of the 
year. 



3072 The Academy. 

— For the benefit of any who may not have seen last month's 
programme of Commencement we repeat the same in this issue. 
The Baccalaureate Sermon will be delivered on Sunday, May 22, at 
11 o'clock, a. m. Monday will be Seniors' Day, with Tree Planting 
in the morning, Class Exercises in the afternoon, and Grand Con- 
cert in the evening. Tuesday will be Alumnae Day, with Business 
Meeting, and other gatherings as may be later announced, and also 
Class Reunions. The day will again close with a Grand Concert. 
The Commencement Exercises proper will take place on Wednes- 
day morning, when the Diplomas will be presented and the Liter- 
ary Address delivered. The sermon on Sunday will be by the 
Rev. Dr. Chrietzberg, of Winston, and the Literary Address by 
the Rev. Dr. William H. Holland, of Pittsburg, Penna. 



— We give elsewhere a review of the book of poems which 

has recently been published by Miss Emma Lehman, the head of 

our Senior department. It is a matter of great satisfaction that this 

collection has been put into print, for while Miss Lehman's abilitv 

,has been long recognized, and her poems have appeared in many 

papers and magazines, it is difficult to preserve them unless they 

are placed in book form. Hence school and community are to be 

congratulated on the appearance of this neatly-printed and valuable 

little volume. 

\ _ 

— The religious life within the school has been unusuallv warm 
and bright during the term. Bishop Rondthaler's loving work 
has been appreciated to a remarkable degree this year, and the 
earnestness of the large number of Christian young people appears 
in the interest in the ordinary channels of religious life, and also in 
the numbers who attend the Wednesday evening prayer-meeting, 
and the circle prayer-meetings, where the attendance is entirely op- 
tional. Perhaps one of the most pleasing gatherings of the year is 
the Sunday evening Vesper Service, when the programme is made 
largely by the pupils, and in which the very best talent of school 
and town has been enlisted to make the services notable gatherings. 
In addition to well known speakers and individual singers, we have 
had with us quartettes from the various churches in Winston-Salem, 



The Academy. 3G73 

also members of the Salem Orchestra, and the subjects have been 
at times illustrated with great effect by stereopticon views. Over 
and above all this special preparation is a strong and clear religious 
spirit, which has been a cause of great thankfulness, for with an 
earnest religious spirit abroad among the pupils the intellectual and 
social life is also much more satisfactory and happy. 



Alumnae Hall. 



On the first page of. our April number we give a picture of the 
new hall, which is now in course of erection. A portion of the 
foundation has been laid, and it is hoped that circumstances will 
make it possible to push the work forward rapidly this summer. 
There are a number of important questions involved, but the affairs 
of the building are in the hands of some of our most able and con- 
servative men, and we have no doubt but that the various questions 
involved will be satisfactorily taken up and solved. The size of 
of the building can hardly be estimated from the cut which is given 
in this issue. The reader who is familiar with the other buildings 
will be able to estimate the size of Alumna? Hall when we say that 
the structure, even after certain modifications have been introduced, 
will still be considerably larger than Main Hall. The large hall in 
this building, even when the modified plans have been completed, 
will be a little larger than the Bethlehem, Pa., Moravian church, 
and those who are acquainted with the Bethlehem church will recall 
the grand proportions of that stately edifice. But one of the most 
valuable features of the new building, when it is completed, will be 
that above the great hall the entire space will be devoted to music, 
and the entire Music Department will be transferred to this building, 
making it a splendid music conservatory, with a total capacity of 
not less than fifty rooms for teaching and practice, and with every- 
thing new and modern, and with the large auditorium in the same 
building in which Concerts (and shall we say great music festivals ) 
will be held in the future, and in which we feel sure the great organ 
will be eventually placed. The picture will show to the reader the 
classical beauty of the structure, which, though plain and modest, 
is still purely classical and monumental in its appearance. When 



3074 The Academy. 

completed the building will be a great addition to the Music De- 
partment, with its three hundred pupils, as well as to the town and 
to the State, for we feel sure that with the completion of this struct- 
ure there will be notable gatherings in the future which will give to 
the Music Department a prestige even greater than it has ever had 
in the past. 



EASTER. 



The sacred Easter season has visited us once more, and with 
it all the memories of the passion and death of our blessed Lord 
and Saviour have been revived. Very few of the pupils went to 
their homes, and many visitors were present. All participated rev- 
erently and interestedly in the services, which began with Palm 
Sunday, and passing from one event to the other, through Maundy 
Thursday, Good Friday, and Great Sabbath, finally culminated in 
the gladsome Easter Sunday. The weather was fine, the services 
largely attended, and the season throughout was a delightful and 
happy one. Some of the many visitors whose names we succeeded 
in securing we give below : 

Misses Sadie Rollins, Mattiella Cocke, Annie Barnard, Ashe- 
ville, N. C. ; Misses Annie Walker, Henrietta Reid, Reidsville, N. 
C. ; Miss Adelia Purnell, Raleigh, N. C. ; Miss Hannah Dewey, 
Goldsboro, N. C. ; Misses Page and Dicks, Randleman, N. C. ; 
Mrs. A. E. Lentz, Concord, N. C. ; Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Myers, 
Jacksonville, Fla. ; Miss Ada Carpenter, Cedar Hill, N. C. ; Miss 
Lizzie Spencer, Ashboro, N. C. ; Mrs. W. L. Sherrod, Hamilton, 
N. C. ; Mrs. W. L. Moorman, Lynchburg, Va. ; Mrs. H. G. Aird, 
Jacksonville, Fla. ; Mrs. J. Carter, Aberdeen, N. C. ; Mr. Dave 
Parks, Hillsboro, N. C. ; Mr. J. T. Branch, Rocky Mount, N. C. ; 
Mrs. Mary Miller Southerland, Goldsboro, N. C. ; Miss Annie May 
Van Lindlev, Pomona, N. C. 



— Rev. Edward S. Wolle made a visit to Salem early in April. 
His visits are always a source of pleasure to his hosts of friends. 

— Mr. C. B. Pfohl is in Texas, and has been there more than 
a month. He has met many former friends in the Lone Star State. 



The Academy 3075 

Poems by E. A. Lehman. 
The Grafton Press. Nezv York. 



A neat, attractive little booklet of fifty pages, with the above 
title page was handed us by the author some days ago. Miss Leh- 
man, the head of our Senior Class Department and Instructor of 
Literature in the Academy, has been recognized for a number of 
years as a poet of ability, and the poems which she has written from 
time to time have been eagerly sought by newspapers and maga- 
zines, but the booklet referred to above is the first time that her 
poems have appeared in book form, and all North Carolinians will 
welcome this addition to the State literature, but none more than 
our own school family. 

The little book does not, by any means, present the entire col- 
lection of poems which have come from the pen of this gifted writer, 
but may be said to be a representative group of her poems. Those 
who know the writer best can easily read " between the lines " and 
see that they come from the heart. Miss Lehman's well known 
love of nature is shown in "The March Wind," "A Marriage in 
High Life," "Queen Flora's Opening Day." Her strong affec- 
tion for her native State, its history, its men, its splendid natural 
scenery appears in in "Sunset on Pilot Mountain," "North Caro- 
lina Heroes ' ' and ' ' The Hills of Carolina. ' ' The Moravian Church 
has no more devoted member than Miss Lehman, and this deep 
and tender love appears in such selections as " The Silent Village," 
"Our Graveyard Cedars," and " Sesqui-Centennial Ode." There 
are possibly still deeper and more tender personal allusions in this 
collection to feelings which are locked within the inmost recesses of 
the mind, andh ence the booklet comes to us as a collection of sweet 
songs from the heart, which will in turn speak long and often to 
other hear,ts. 

The Academy is proud of this addition to its literature, and 
we hope, from time to time, with the consent of the author to repro- 
duce one and another of the poems. 

Although Miss Lehman had only a limited edition printed to 
distribute to her friends, and not primarily to place upon sale, we 
learn that she is willing to dispose of a few copies, and the Academy 
will be glad to send the booklet to any address, upon receipt of the 
price, 50 cents. 



— A letter received a day or two since from Dr. Holland, tells 
us that he is sure to be with us at Commencement time, and that he 
hopes to remain in North Carolina long enough to renew his ac- 
quaintance with the scenes of earlier days. 



3076 The Academy. 

from alumna and other friends. 

All communications for this Department should be addressed to The Academy, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. Teachers, as well as friends residing in the towns are invited to send us letters 
from former pupils, or from other friends, when the letters relate to matters of interest to our 
readers. 



— A pupil of many years ago sends us the following lines : 

"A friend sent me a clipping from a paper, claiming Mrs. 
William Henry as the oldest, or, at least, one of the oldest 
students living of Salem Academy and College, she having been 
there in 1851— '53. I am older, having been there in 1841—42. 

"It is a pleasant memory of the past that Miss Stauber 
visited me after my marriage and not long before her death. You 
see I am thinking of Salem and my school days. May the Acad- 
emy be a blessing in the future as it has been in the past is the 
sincere wish of an old pupil. 

" Mrs. E. B. Allison." 

Turnersburg, N. C. 

— A well-known and highly-esteemed friend in Pennsylvania 
writes as follows : 

' ' Enclosed you will find one dollar to renew my subscription 
to The Academy. I am sorry that I neglected it at all, but hope 
hereafter to enjoy the school news with a clear conscience. Some 
of our Linden Hall friends, who have visited Salem, always show a 
deep interest in the development of affairs in your school. My 
thoughts are often with you, and I wish that I might live over the 
happy days I spent there, although I find it very pleasant to be 
engaged in active and responsible duties. With love for Mrs. 
Clewell and yourself, I am, your old' pupil, 

"Elizabeth Bahnson." 

Lititz, Penna. 

— From Alabama we receive the following letter, which takes 
us into the distant past : 

" Many, many thanks for your kind reply to my note of in- 
quiry and the enclosed articles. The historical sketch of Salem 
Female Academy and College I have read with much pleasure, and 



The Academy. 3077 

will try and send for the history soon. The family I wanted to 
hear from was the Kramsh family. A Miss Kramsh was teaching 
or connected with the school just before the Civil War as a cousin 
of mine. Miss Sallie Walker saw her while at school in Salem, 
and told me that Miss Kramsh mentioned the family connection. 

' ' My father and uncle ( John and Josiah Walker ) were placed 
at Nazareth Hall when they were children, and my grandparents 
visited relatives at Bethlehem, who were the founders of these insti- 
tutions. The Kramsh family wrote to them, and there are some 
water color sketches in my possession by some of that family. There 
was a lady, too, whose name I cannot recall, who went from Penn- 
sylvania to Salem. I had some of her papers and a sketch of her 
life, but have lost it. She was highly accomplished and devotedly 
pious. She was related, too. My great-grandfather's name was 
Cooper, or Kyper, and my understanding is that all these relations 
came over in the first half of 1700. The Coopers were in Philadel- 
phia or New York. The gentleman who brought his family to 
New York had married a lady named Mary Somers or Summers, I 
am not certain which, but she was a person of great piety and cul- 
ture, and descended from the Stadholders of Holland. I wanted 
to find from the Moravian side all I could of their family history, 
because mv side has been culpably negligent in the matter of 
records. I have some information on the subject, and get letters 
from time to time regarding some fact or other, and would like to 
be better informed. 

" Thanking you again, I am, most truly, 

"M. E. Reese." 

Berlin, Ala. 

— A Tennessee friend has the following pleasant and friendly 
word for former friends and acquaintances : 

' ' I cannot tell how much pleasure I have derived from reading 
The Academy. I eagerly read every word of it, and enjoy all of 
it. The only way I keep up with my former schoolmates is through 
its pages, for, unfortunately for me, none of them write to me now, 
which I regret very much, for I am always glad to hear anything 
about them I can. 

' ' As you see I have once more changed my address. I re- 



3078 The Academy. 

ceived the two numbers of The Academy for September and Oc- 
tober, forwarded from Bethlehem. I thought it better to remain at 
home this winter, as I have spent so many years away, so I did not 
return to the dear old Seminary at Bethlehem. I spent two happy 
years teaching there, and sometimes get real homesick to go back. 
But the first opportunity that presents itself I am coming to visit 
my friends at Salem. I cannot tell you how much I long to return 
to dear old Salem, and see the dear teachers and friends. 

' ' I was so glad to see Dr. and Mrs. Clewell and Bishop 
Rondthaler in Bethlehem some time since, and you may be sur- 
prised when I tell you that they did not know me at first. Wonder 
if you would recognize me if I should return to Salem now ? 

" I am glad to notice so many improvements described in The 
Academy, and I do not know whether I could find the Fourth and 
the North Senior Rooms or not. I see very few familiar names in 
looking over the list of pupils. 

' ' Am so sorry that I did not know Misses Lou and Sallie 
Shaffner were in Knoxville last summer. I would have made a 
special effort to see them, for I passed through Knoxville while the 
summer school was in progress. 

1 ' You see I am not so fortunate as some of my schoolmates. 
I change my address often, but not my name. That still remains 
Doak. and I think will for some time. 

' ' Mama and I often speak of you and wish you could visit us 
again. Please give my love to Dr. and Mrs. Clewell, Bishop 
Rondthaler, Misses Lehman, Shaffner, Wolle, Jeter, Prof. 
Shirley and Mr. Pfohl. 

" I am, very sincerely, yours, 

•' Flora Doak." 

Bryson, Tennessee. 

— A few lines of bright and hearty greeting from an Asheville 
friend are as follows : 

' ' I suppose you think I have ceased to exist, but such is not 
the case, I can assure you. You have no idea how glad I am that 
you have such a full school this year. In fact, I watch it with the 
greatest of care possible. Asheville certainly has her share down 
there. 



The Academy. 3079 

"Sister Emma and their family have moved into their own 
home, so our family is quite small now. Enclosed you will find my 
subscription to The Academy. Please remember me to all, espe- 
cially to Mrs. Ci.ewell. 

' ' Sincerely, 

" Sadie Rollins." 
Asheville, N. C. 

— A line from an esteemed Atlanta alumna will be read with 
pleasure by many friends, who will recall the face of the writer as 
they read the lines : 

' ' Please find enclosed one doliar, which you will please place 
to my credit for The Academy. We noticed that our subscription 
has expired, and we do enjoy getting The Academy so much. 

' ' Yours, cordially, 

Harriet S. Ollinger." 
Atlanta, Go. 

ifrlustc department. 



— One of the evidences of the approach of the end of the 
school-year is the number of Graduating Recitals being given in 
our College Chapel. Under the masterly guidance of Professor 
Shirley and Miss Morrison the Department of Music has at- 
tained to a degree of excellence not equalled by that of any past 
year in the history of the department. Since Mr. Shirley's com- 
ing to Salem eight years ago his aim has been to establish and 
maintain a high standard of musicianship and culture among his 
pupils, and his best endeavor has been given to obtain this result. 
His sincere and deep sympathy for his young players in their hopes 
and his desire to equip them properly for the carrying out of their 
plans has been the secret of his success. He does not shirk trouble 
or responsibility, and in his work is always seeking out the difficult 
and valuable. 

Miss Morrison is comparatively new in the ranks of voice 
teachers, having been with us in that capacity only a little more 
than two years, but her success entitles her name to be placed 
alongside with the best. 



3080 * The Academy. 

Below we give a representative program of the graduating 
series, with a few press notices : 

Bach Fantaisia in C Minor 

Dussek La Consolation. Op. 26. 

Tschaikozvsky Recitative and Aria. 

Farewell, ye hills," from Jeanne d'Arc. 

Mac Dowel I By a Meadow Brook. 

McDowell To a Water Lily. 

E. B. Perry Lorelei. 

Nevin Oh ! that we two were Maying. 

MacDowell The Robin sings in the Apple-Tree. 

Liza Lehman You and I. 

\jiszt Liebestraume, No. 2. 

Nicode Tarantelle. Op. 13. 

Mozart Recitative and Aria. 

" Dovo Sono " from Le Nozze di Figaro. 

Scharwenka Scherzo from Concerto. Op. 32. 

"Miss Bulluck is gifted with a soprano voice of beautiful 
timbre, and is, no doubt, one of the coming singers of the State. 
Her voice has wonderful power and though she is so young it 
already shows great dramatic possibilities, as was clearly shown in 
the Tschaikovvsky recitative and aria. ' ' 

" Miss Harris has exceptional technical equipment, combined 
with true musical instinct. The impassioned beauty of her tones in 
the playing of MacDowell' s beautiful " To a Water Lily" will not 
soon be forgotten by those who were fortunate enough to hear her. ' ' 

The first Recital of the series was given by Miss Ruby Mc- 
Corkle, '04, of Atlanta, Ga. "Her playing of a very difficult 
program was masterly in the extreme, and the ease with which she 
would pass from a brilliant Sapillienkoff composition to a dainty, 
Templeton Strong number showed her wonderful technique to ad- 
vantage. Her playing indicates a thoroughly musical temperament, 
and her teacher and friends are expecting much from her. ' ' 

Miss Ivy Nicewonger was the third young graduate to win 
honors for herself. The interest that has been manifested in these 
Recitals is particularly pleasing, alike to pupil and teacher. Below 
we give another press notice : 

" Miss Nicewonger seemed equally at home in McDowell's 






• 
The Academy. - 3081 



" Death Nothing is but Cooling Night," and in the dainty conceits 
of Poldini's " Poupee Valsante. " In fact, the mood of each com- 
position was successfully presented, and another pupil has, by ease 
and brilliancy of execution, well earned the coveted diploma from 
Salem's Music Department." 



— Sunday afternoon, March 20, the King's Daughters met for 
the last time this session, and the following officers were chosen for 
next year: Miss Wolle — President; Miss Cammie Lindley — 
Vice President ; Miss Fannie Brooke — Secretary ; Miss Rusha 
Sherrod — Treasurer. 



IFn Jflemoriam. 



Again we are called upon to mourn the departure of one of 
our younger band of Alumnae, Mrs. Bernard A. Brooks, better 
known to us as Nellie Cramer, of Thomasville, N. C, who de- 
parted on March 19th, — from an attack of appendicitis. 

It has not been very long since she was here among us, happy 
in the training of a fresh, sweet voice, developing it, as we then 
thought, for usefulness and service here on earth, and now, even in 
life's fair morning hours, before the heat and burden of the day 
came upon her she has joined the choirs above. 

But a few months ago, last November, she stood at the mar- 
riage altar, a happy bride, with all of hope and joy and love before 
her and now she is gone, — gone from those who loved her so dearly 
down into the silence of the grave. We bow in humble submission 
to the will of Him who never makes mistakes, even when His dis- 
pensations seem hard and inscrutable to us with our short-sighted 
vision. Some day, when the earth-mists of our lower plane have 
faded before the eternal glory of heaven, we shall know why such 
crushing sorrows are sent upon us : until then we can only trust 
and say, through blinding tears, " Thy will be done." 

fftartteti. 



Keen — Schoolfield — At Mt. Vernon Church, Danvil'e, Va,, on 
March 30, 1904, Mr Archibald Dickinson Keen to Miss Daisy, d uighter 
of Mr. and Mrs- John Harrell Schoolfield, of Danville. Ya 

Reynolds — Morgan — On April 5th, 1904, in Richmond, Va., Mr. 
William Ayres Reynolds to Miss Alyce Blanche, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel Tate Morgan, of Richmond, Va 



5©ieTi. 



Brooks — In Thomasvil'.e, N. C , on Mir. 19, 1904, Mrs. A. B. Brooks 
(Nellie Cramer). 



THE EUTERPEAN. 

AND 

THE HESPERIAN. 

This department is devoted to the combined interests of the 
Euterpean a?id Hesperian Literary Societies. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Agnes Belle Goldsby, E. L. S. 
Florence Moorman, H. L. S. 

Mary B. Gudger, E. L. S. 
Frances Powers, E. L. S. 
Cammie Lindley, H. L. S. 

Helen M. Blandford, E. L. S. 
Ora Hunter, H. L. S. 

Carrie Levy, E. L. S. 
Brietz Thom, H. L. S. 

CORINNE BASKIN, E. L. S. 

Rusha Sherrod, H. L. S. 

Emma B Greider, E. L. S. 
Ora Hunter, H. L. S. 



\ Editors-in-Chief. 



f Assistant Editors. 

J- Literary Editors. 

> Exchange Editors. 

> Business Managers. 
| Artists. 



iHtiitortal. 



A gush of bird-song, a patter of dew, 
A cloud, and a rainbow's warning, 
Suddenly sunshine and perfect blue — 
An April day in the morning. 

— Harriet Spofford. 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



3083 



— We, the editorial staff of The Euterpean and The Hes- 
peeian department of The Academy, hope that this Easter of 
1904 has benefitted every one of our readers. Who could witness 
the solemn ' ' sunrise ' ' Easter service and fail to be impressed 
with it. 



/' .//' / 



/ , 






— Easter eggs are symbolical of the re-creation of Spring. The 
practice of presenting eggs to our friends at Easter is Persian, and 
bears an allusion to the mundane egg, for which Ormuzd and Ahri- 
man were to contend till the consummation of all things. Chris- 
tians adopted the custom to symbolize the resurrection, and the red 
are colored in allusion to the blood of the redemption. There is a 
tradition, also, that the world was "hatched," or created, at Eas- 
ter-tide. 



April Fool 



A. B G 



'0 4 



Illustrated by Emma Greider. 

The genuine April shower, which announced the beginning of 
a new month, also heralded his first appearanre in this world of 
ours. 

His anniversaries since that eventful day had been just like 
every one else's, on some the heavens were stained a dull leaden 
gray, the only bright spot between earth and sky being his cheerful 
carrotty hair. On others the sun beamed benignly upon his curls, 
showing their ruddy glow and each individual freckle to the best 
advantage. 



3084 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



The boys nicknamed him ' ' April Fool ' ' when he was a tiny 
little fellow, and the name clung to him long after the strawberry 
kinks had been supplanted by the luxuriant auburn locks that now 
crowned his finely-shaped head. It was not until he "he did him- 
self proud " at college and then won his first case, that his com- 
rades dubbed him ' ' The Hon Eugene Norwood Baxton. ' ' 

He was not thinking of these things as he sat at his desk, idly 
drawing queer figures on the great sheet of paper that lay before 
him. It was his twenty-fifth birthday ! His mother's sunny smile, 





the "kid's" twenty-five vigorous, brotherly whacks and a deli- 
cately-perfumed note, brimful of good wishes, had reminded him of 
that fact early in the morning. 

Now, as he sat day-dreaming in the cozy law-office upstairs, 
he thought of his first party. He remembered just how he had 
kicked and screamed while the patient nurse had scrubbed his 
chubby little face and chubbier little paws and smoothed the tangled 
curls ; and how timidly he had entered the parlor holding fast to 
his mother's hand. He remembered a slip of a girlie in a dainty 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3085 

muslin frock, adorned with fresh, blue ribbons. He vaguely won- 
dered if she liked to make mud pies, and if her fragile fingers were 
ever all streaked with samples of that palatable dish as his usually 
were. He also remembered that he had tried to kiss her when they 
played "Hide the Slipper." Without one moment's hesitation 
she had slapped his rosy cheek, and cruelly and contemptuously 
bade him : " Go 'way, you horwid, ugly, red-headed boy !" 

A smile flitted across his face at these reminiscences of his happy 
childhood. He had not forgotten the blow — nor the lassie ! 

Then his thoughts turned toward the fete given in his honor 
when he came home from college. Again he had made a similar 
request of that self-same maiden and once more she refused his plea, 
and had actually called him a ' 'foolish school-boy. ' ' Drawing him- 
self to his fullest height indignantly he informed her that he had 
finished with lessons long ago and that now he was a man and she 
must treat him as such ! Her merry laugh rang in his ears and he 
seemed to look into those heavenly blue eyes and fancied that he 
saw something beside mirth hiding in their clear, azure depths. 

He stopped scribbling and stared fixedly at the wall for five 
whole minutes. Suddenly without a word of warning he almost 
shouted : 

'■ By jingo ! I'll try again !" 

if if if if if. if if if 

" Do you remember that day, Margery !" 

" I think I do," she replied, carelessly, then added : "Eugene,, 
please lend me your knife. This stem is so much longer than the 
rest that I just can't put it in the bowl with the other roses." 

' ' May I finish now ?' ' he questioned abruptly. 

' ' That depends on what you are going to say, ' ' she answered.. 
"Which blade is the sharpest? There, thank you, Eugene." 

" Margery, I have something to tell you, and — " 

"Oh, how nice!" she interrupted, mischievously, "is it any 
thing very exciting?" 

"Please, don't. You are really cruel. Margery, you know 
what I mean !" 

He spoke so earnestly, so beseechingly, that the merry lightL 
died away from her eyes, and she said firmly : 

" Now, Eugene, don 7 begin that kind - of thing — that — " 



3086 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

" I must — won't you — er — er?" 

No, I won't err," she answered, distinctly and emphatically." 

He rose and came toward her. The blue eyes returned the 
steady gaze of the brown, unflinchingly. 

' ' Listen to me, Margery. ' ' 

She shook her head. 

" You don't care for me — and never will?" 

His voice trembled as he spoke. 

" No," she replied. 

He observed the smile lurking in the corners of her mouth. 

"You shall not laugh at me !" he exclaimed, passionately, and 
then added, hastily ' ' Margery, good-bye !' ' 

Just as he reached the door and turned the knob she called 
softly, 

" Eugene !" 

He looked at her for an instant as she stood before him. Her 
dress of soft white material formed a strong contrast to the rich, 
crimson roses fastened in her belt. Her eyes sparkled, her cheeks 
were flushed and the silken tendrils which clustered lovingly round 
her fair brow shone like burnished gold. 

" Eugene !" she repeated. 

He took both her hands in his — as they always do, you know 
— and glanced at her questionly — " Eugene, April Fool !" 



A Matchmaker in Disguise. 



F M., H L S. 



Illustrated by Ora Hunter. 

At length, after a very warm day, the village school was out. 
All around the little white school-house on the hill, eager feet were 
hurrying homeward, while the shouts of merry voices proclaimed 
that their owners were free for the rest of the day. But, mirabile 
dictu, a slender youth, of apparently seventeen years of age, did not 
hurry with his companions. In fact, it was a doubtful question 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3087 

as to whether Laurie Wynne was really moving or not, so slowly 
did he walk down the hill in the direction of his home which stood 
alone on the outskirts of the village. No wonder he walked so 
slowly, for had not the lad ample food for thought ? Had not his 
joke of yesterday, although prompted only by the boy's love of 
fun, been severely judged by Mr. Moore, the schoolmaster, and 
must not the penalty prove equally severe? It was, indeed, hard, 
too hard as our hero decided. 

It was the custom of the village schoolmaster to entertain his 
pupils and patrons each spring with an informal reception. For 
this purpose recitations were suspended two hours earlier on the 
day of the ' ' Spring Festival. ' ' The pupils eagerly looked forward 
to this occasion — in fact, it was such a treat for them that almost 
before one reception was over the pupil's eye scanned the calandar 
for the ' ' red letter ' ' day of next year. 

Our story opens on the day preceding the schoolmaster's 
annual reunion. For days, and even months, the pupils had 
planned for this coming event, — the girls deciding in which dresses 
they were most bewitching, and the boys wondering what on earth 
there would be to eat. At last the days had rolled by — slowly 
enough, too, — bringing the great day nearer and nearer until now 
it stood just in front of the expectant pupils. But perfect happiness 
is impossible. The doom fell, caused by Laurie's joke. Gravely, 
but no less positively, had the unnatural schoolmaster pronounced 
the fatal words which caused cold shivers to run down the victim's 
spine : " You may join us after the usual school hours to-morrow." 
He had said after very emphatically, and that little word of five 
letters simply meant that Laurie must remain in the school-master's 
study for hvo mortal hours. A modern Tantalus, he would be 
hearing the shouts of his companions outside, and probably seeing 
his girl go off to the spring with another boy. It was almost un- 
bearable. Was there no way out ? 

Now, Laurie had a sister, and he, although three years her 
junior, had reached her in height. There was a marked resem- 
blance between brother and sister, the same mischievous bright 
eyes and brown, curly hair adorned the face and head of both 
Laurie Wynne and his sister, Mary. In fact, as the boys said, they 
were enough alike to "be each other. ' ' But then there was a 



3088 The Euterpean and The Hesperian 

decided difference, too, as all the village knew, Mr. Moore was 
deeply in love with Mary Wynne. And every one knew equally 
well that the schoolmaster was evidently not in love with Laurie 
Wynne. 

At first, the lad had thought to make a confident of his sister, 
but upon further thought he decided that Mary, who evidently ad- 
mired the grave, brilliant schoolmaster very much, might approve 
of the schoolmaster's punishment, and thinking it a pretty hard 
thing, the boy decided, to have his own ' ' flesh and blood ' ' 
against him. 

On down the hill the boy moved no less slowly than at first, 
until he had reached the bottom, when he suddenly stopped, gave a 
wild jump, and exclaimed, "I'll do it," and began to run in his 
homeward direction. A new thought had evidently entered the 
cranium of Master Lawrence Wynne. 



It was dusk, on the same day. All alone the schoolmaster sat 
in his darkened study. His thoughts were with Mary Wynne, and 
he wondered how she would take her brother's enforced absence 
from the party. Would she herself come, or on his account, stay 
away ? 

Suddenly the study door opened and a servant appeared upon 
the threshold, followed by a lady. 

"A lady to see you, sir," the servant announced, and then 
withdrew. 

The object of the schoolmaster's thoughts advanced into the 
room eagerly, the schoolmaster arose from his chair and advanced 
with outstretched hand to welcome his visitor. But Miss Wynne, 
appearing not to notice the outstretched hand, stopped and bowed 
formally. Mr. Moore, although somewhat surprised at the extreme 
formality of his "lady love's" manner, guessed at once that her 
visit was on account of ' ' that scapegrace brother of hers, ' ' as 
Laurie was mentally termed by his instructor. In his grave way 
the schoolmaster drew up an easy chair for his visitor, but she 
declined it with a slight inclination of her head, and, murmuring 
something in a low voice, took a chair some distance from Mr. 
Moore. 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian 30X1) 

More surprised than ever now the schoolmaster seated himself 
in the chair which the lady had refused, and began : 

' ' Miss Wynne, I think I know to what I owe the honor of 
your visit. You come on your brother's account? Am I correct?" 

The lady nodded an assent, but it was too dark for the school- 
master to see her face. 

" Do you desire his release?" the schoolmaster asked. 

The lady nodded again, more decidedly than before. 

" But, Miss Wynne, you do not understand the circumstances," 
continued the schoolmaster, earnestly. ' ' Do you not see that order 
must be maintained? If, after stating your brother's punishment 
before the entire school, I should let this offense pass by, the pupils 
will think that I am deficient in firmness, and I will lose control of 
them utterly. Will nothing that I can do make this satisfactory 
to you ?' ' 

' ' Nothing but his release, ' ' answered the lady somewhat un- 
graciously, playing nervously with her hands. 

' ' And that he cannot have, ' ' answered the schoolmaster very 
decidedly, and then changing his decided voice of a minute ago to 
one of tender entreaty, he continued, "Oh, Mary, give me the 
right to control Laurie as a brother. You know that I love you 
devotedly, that the days and nights are full of you. ' ' 

He arose and, advancing toward Miss Wynne, reached for her 
hand, but that lady jumped from her chair, and hastily retreated 
backward, upsetting chairs on the way until she came in contact 
with the door which stopped her retreat, and where she stood as an 
animal at bay. Mr. Moore, perceiving the lady's startling attitude, 
exclaimed : 

' ' My darling, do not answer me now. Think it over and to- 
morrow evening after the reception give me my answer. ' ' 

The lady nodded, and opening the door bowed herself out. 

When the door had closed after his visitor, the schoolmaster 
murmured softly to himself : 

" Poor little thing ! How I startled her ! I wonder if that's 
the way all girls do when a fellow offers ' ' his heart and hand. ' ' 

In the meantime the schoolmaster's proposal was having a 
very peculiar effect upon Miss Wynne. Leaving the schoolmaster's 
house, she walked rapidly toward her own home beyond the village. 



3090 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



When she had gone about half-a-mile she suddenly turned aside 
from the main road and, vaulting a fence, stood in a field. She 
seemed convulsed with mirth, and soon the fields rang with loud, 
boyish laughter, and removing the hat the head of Master Lawrence 
Wynne appeared. His make-up was very simple but a perfect 
disguise. Only his sister's skirt and waist put on over his own 
clothes and her street hat on his head ! 

Proceeding to disrobe the boy caught sight of his hands, 
whereupon he laughed heartily, and exclaimed : 

" I imagine, old Moore's holding these things in tender clasp. 
I'm in a pickle though, now, sure enough. Wont I be more than 
paid for my confinement to-morrow, when old Moore finds it out. 
I must keep Mary away from that reception to-morrow. ' ' 

After disrobing, Master Lawrence Wynne rolled his sister's 
clothes up and, placing them under his arm sped rapidly over the 
fields to his home. 

( To be contimied. ) 




The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 3091 

Soctctg jfiotes antr ILocate. 



M. B G AND F P. 



— On March 18th a very interesting debate was held in the 
Society, the query being : Resolved, That Bachelors 
are happier than Old Maids." The discussion was discussed from 
every imaginable point, and many good arguments given : however 
the judges decided in favor of the negatives, namely : Carrie 
Price and Frances Powers. 

— An important business meeting was held the first of March. 
Several articles in our Constitution were discussed. At the end of 
the meeting we had decided to live more closely to our Constitution. 

— The usual Society piays have been abandoned for this year. 
The two Societies have ban led together and decided to resort to 
other ways for making money. A few weeks past they sold ices, 
cakes and other things, and from them obtained quite a neat sum. 

— Two new fire-escape, have been built,- — the one leading from 
the Junior classroom to the church, and the other extending from 
the Studio around to the upper back porch. 

— The Seniors had intended planting their Class Ivy on March 
29th, but, owing to the sudden change of the weather they were 
prevented from carrying out their plans. 

— Among the girls who went home for the Easter holidays, 
were Misses Carrington, Taylor, Farthing, Spease, Gaither 
and Kime. 



cammie lindley. 



— We had several members of last year's Senior Class with us 
during Easter, and we were all glad to see them here again. They 
were Misses Sadie Rollins, Hannah Dewey, Matiella Cocke 
Ada Clark, Henrietta Reid and Annie Walker. 

— The members of the Book-keeping Class are now employed 
as book-keepers by the publishers of The New Era in Education, 
a monthly magazine, and we heartily wish them success in their 
new occupation. 



3092 The Euterpean and The Hesperian 

— Rusha and Mary Sherrod were glad to have Mrs. Sher- 
rod with them during Easter. 

— Miss Bulluck, a member of the Hesperian Society, gave 
her Graduating Recital in Vocal Music last month, and we always 
know what to expect when she is asked to help in our society pro- 
grams, and look forward to it with pleasure. 

— Among the various Graduating Recitals given last month 
were those given by Misses Nicewonger, Eva Harris and Ruby 
McCorkle. 

— Several of our girls spent Easter at home, and all came back 
with fresh minds to finish their work. 

— Mrs. Moorman visited Florence and Corinna during 
Easter. 

— The pictures shown by Dr. Clewell in the Vesper Service 
of March 27th added greatly to the pleasure of every one, and the 
music was very good. 

— The Juniors are very proud of their new carpets, and they 
thank Dr. Clewell very heartily for them. 



' ' How far is it around the world ?' ' 

In girlish innocence, asked she. 

" Oh, I will measure it," he said, 

" If you'll permit me to, and see." 

Then when his strong right arm he placed, 

Around her waist, so small, so trim. 

He found it wasn't very far, 

For she was all the world to him. 

— Exchange. 



Dear Father : 

Roses are red, violets are blue, 
Send me fifty, I love you. 



Dear Son 



Some roses are read, 
Others are pink ; 
Enclosed find fifty — 
I don't think. 

— Exchange. 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 



30& 




iSxcijange department. 



C. L., '06 and B. T., '04. 



-We acknowledge the receipt of the following exchanges : 
The St. Edward' s College Echo, The Criterion, The Guilford 
Collegian, State Normal Magazine, The Comenian, William Woods 
College Record, The Red and White, Helios, Linden Hall Echo, 
Doajie Owl, Davidson College Magazine, Hall Boy, Blue and 
W'hite, The Mercury, Orange and Blue. 



— The Davidson College Magazine is a splendid college paper. 
It contains much that is interesting and at the same time instructive.. 



3094 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

— We congratulate the William Woods College Echo on its 
new cover. As The Academy received her new robes since the 
beginning of 1904, she can feel how proud another paper must be 
-on first appearing in its new gown. 

— We would advise the writer of the article, ' ' Does Education 
Make People Better ?' ' to study comparison of adjectives. For we 
at least have not heard that the comparative degree of "bad" has 
has changed from ' ' worse " to " badder. ' ' 

— The Helios is one of our latest visitors and a very welcome 
one. 

— The Guilford Collegian contains an interesting series of 
sketches on the life of Washington. 

— The excellent advice given by the Red and White should go 
to the printer who was the cause of ' ' the mass of streaks supposed 
to be a pretty girl." 

— The following is the latest popular toast in regular army 
circles : 

To the Ladies — 

Our arms your defence, 
Your arms our recompence. 
Fall in ! 

" A Beastly Mistake" in The Mercury is a clever article. 

The Doane Owl comes to us full of good reading. "Hadji 
Ahmed Laughs ' ' deserves mention. 

They sealed their lover's compact with a kiss, 
A blissful moment followed. 

Soft and clear 
He heard her ask : ' ' Do you suppose — that it- 
Is safe with with only one seal on it, dear ?' ' 

— Tribune. 

— The Hall Boy contains an interesting story : ' ' An Adven- 
ture with Desperadoes. ' ' The Hall Boy is all on time. 

If there was a crime to be committed, 
And to me the choice fell, 
I'd choose to (w)ring the neck 
Of that horrid rising bell. 

— The Mercury. 



The Academy. 



3095 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 1*9-1 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments ; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter State University without examination, 
Situations easily secured by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and Type- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogua. 

JAS. P. BROWER, A. M., Head Master. 



DO 

YOU 

WANT 

THE 

SHOE 

THAT'S 

ALL 

THE 

GO? 



IF 

SO 

SEE 

US 



WINSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL J-OZDsTES. 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



3096 



The Academy. 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment ol rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs- Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many others tnat h rt ve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the other hand we have a stock that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties — Fabrics that hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others tnat will 
please the most exclusive and exac.ing taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOROSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of 'this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 3097 

102d YE^Ft 



SALGm ACADGmY 

ADD (fOLLGGG 

WLNSTON-SALEM, IN, C 



Salem Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually added to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carefully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos Comenius. and, through the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parenis who commit their children to the care of the School are alwajs 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far an<J near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed. 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ng of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School has been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is n£>w arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where book-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared 
Nor should we overlook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send^to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which wil 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the work of the School is described in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 



3098 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 

NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, 1893. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



ILK US "H'/^ki'TI^ 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream Puffs, ~) 20 cts. Vanilla Wafers. ~) 10 cts. 

Crescents, > per Kisses, [- per 

Cup Cakes, J dozen. Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 

Wwmw Unites Yea Mltoe 



The Academy. 3099- 

ROSENBACHER & BRO.'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE. 

has just received a handsome line of 

ZttTO^IEILjTT.IES 

in Spring materials for 

COAT SUITS, 

SHIRT WAIST SUITS, 
EYENING COSTUMES. 

Fine Patterns for Coat Suits and Dresses only one of a kind 




Pretty Shoes 



of all kinds consisting of SHOP' 



SANDAL , NEWPORT 



IKS and OXFORDS, in both 



BLACK and TAN now in. 



Ask to see the " St. Cecilia" Shoes 
ROSENBACHER & BRG. 



4000 The Academy. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLBR & SON, 1 

WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 






WINSTON-SALEM, N C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER, 



THE ACADEMY. 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 



MAY— JUNE, 1904. 



SALEM ACADEMY AND COLLEGE 

WINSTON=SALEM, N. C. 

FOUNDED 1802 
Rev. JOHN H. CLEWELL, Ph.D., Principal 



The following information will be of service to prospective 
patrons, or those who may desire to know more of our methods. 
The work of the School can only be given in outline in this brief 
space, but a Catalogue and other printed matter will be sent to 
those who apply to the Principal. 

BUILDINGS AND LOCATION. 

The location is in Western North Carolina, 1000 feet above sea 
level, on the foot hills of the Blue Ridge. The School grounds 
embrace more than 40 acres of land, and include a beautiful park 
with magnificent natural scenery. There are nearly a dozen build- 
ings, forming a small village. The School has a capacity of 400 
pupils, with the ability of caring for half that number of boarding 
pupils. The total enrollment of teachers and pupils last year 
was 415. 

METHODS. 

The Preparatory and Collegiate Departments are well equipped 
for thorough work, and the most modern methods are employed. 
With the personal interest in each pupil, with the happy home-life, 
and with the thorough, up-to-date methods of instruction a Salem 
girl will always improve in health, character and intellect. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Music. — During the century of its history Salem has been 
in the lead in its musical advantages. More than 300 names were 
registered in this Department last year. 

Art. — The Studio offers advantages in Drawing and Painting, 
in Water Colors, Oil, China, Glass and Tapestry. Here the advan- 
tages are very fine. 

Commercial. — The study of Book-keeping, Shorthand, Teleg- 
raphy, etc. , are so universal that they need no introduction. In 
Salem all these and more can be studied. 

Industrial. — Instruction in Cooking and Sewing are not 
universally found, and yet we offer the best advantages in both. 
The Catalogue will tell you more about these studies. 

Languages. — The Class Rooms supply good opportunities in 
the Languages, but those who wish to gain lost ground, or make 
special progress, can find all the facilities for private study in Latin 
or Greek, German, or French. 

CARE OF THE SICK. 

A Professional Trained Nurse will give instruction in the care 
of the sick, just that information which every girl should have in 
order to be able to do her duty in the home in later years. 

YOUNG PUPILS. 

The peculiarly careful home regulations enable us to take very 
little girls. Hence boarding pupils even as young as from 8 to 10 ' 
years can be sent to us. 

HIGH IDEALS. 

The ideal of the school is more than intellectual attainments- 
only. Improvement of mind, body and character forms the ideal 
of the School. 

TERMS. 

While not a cheap School, Salem is an economical institution,, 
where every thing is of the best, with a moderate but fair charge 
for what is furnished. 

Full particulars are given in the Catalogue whic'.i will be sent 
on application. 



4002 The Academy. 

— " Touch wood " is an expression often heard when a boast- 
ful utterance is made, but in a spirit of great thankfulness to the 
Almighty do we recall the fact that no serious case of illness asso- 
ciates itself with the past school-year. It is true that there were 
several serious surgical operations, but these were under the direct 
care of the parents, and not really connected with the school. Henec 
when the good health of the year is recalled, it is done with a deep 
sense of gratitude to the Divine Master. 



— Never in the past has the music of the Commencement been 
-of a higher order, and never has the united work of Professors and 
pupils been of such a nature as to reflect greater credit upon the 
■ efforts of the year. Great praise is due Prof. Shirley and his 
. able associates for their faithful and successful efforts. We hope to 
publish a number of the programmes in the Catalogue in order 
that the real work of the year may be fully understood and gauged 
by the proper standard. 



— Last year we received a score or more pupils beyond the 
previous registration. This necessitated the opening of Vogler 
Hall after the new term had begun. All pupils were comfortably 
provided for, but it is easier to do this if registration is in advance 
of the opening week. The number of registrations to date is 25 
per cent, above the number this same date a year ago. Send us 
your names as soon as the decision is made. 



— It will be a source of satisfaction to the many friends of the 
School to know that Mrs. Clewell has returned home fully res- 
tored to health after her two months' sojourn in Pennsylvania. 



— There will be a number of changes in the Faculty next year. 
These changes inevitably carry with them the regrets connected 
with the farewells which must be said ; but, at the same time, there 

;is always great interest in the new names which will appear on the 
list. A brief introduction to some of our new teachers will be found 

cin this number of The Academy. 



The Academy 4003 

— Never has the lawn on the campus appeared more beautiful 
than this year. The grass sown late last summer has given us a 
fine sod, and the winter storms did little damage. Extensive im- 
provements on park and lands around the school are being planned 
for the new year. 



— The meeting of the North Carolina Grand Lodge of the 
Knights of Pythias was held in Winston-Salem in June, and one 
session was held on the Academy campus. The five hundred or 
more persons present were greatly pleased with the fine music, the 
elegant refreshments, the brilliant illumination, the beauty of the 
campus and the cordiality of the reception which appeared in the 
formal addresses as well as in the friendly words spoken in social 
intercourse. 



— We take the liberty of printing again the picture of the new 
Alumnae Memorial Hall as this number of The Academy will be 
sent to many new names. Work will be begun on the Hall as soon 
as some minor details can be settled by the architect, and we hope 
before winter to have it under roof. 



— A parting tribute is due our outgoing Senior Class. They 
played their part well during the year, and the good wishes of their 
teachers and fellow-pupils wfll go with them as they enter upon the 
new duties which they will now be called upon to assume. 



— Those who were present when the promotion cards were 
given to the incoming Senior Class could not but be impressed with 
the fact that the standard of the class is a worthy one. The number 
of the new class is large, and it is the general impression that the 
leadership of the school for the new year will fall into worthy hands. 



— We desire to thank the many friends for the payment of sub- 
scriptions which have been sent to us during the past weeks. May 
we not ask you, kind friend, to examine the address label, and then 
forward us enough money to bring the subscription up to the pres- 
ent date. 



4004 The Academy. 

COMMENCEMENT. 



Commencement is no longer confined to the few days at the 
close of the school session, but has its beginning many days before. 
The Graduating Recitals in the Music Department are a part of 
Commencement ; the Class Exercises and Class Receptions are a 
part of Commencement ; even the picnics and excursions are a part 
of Commencement, because they form a portion of the formal close 
of the year's work. But these preliminary features of Commence- 
ment have been described under the head of School News,, and we 
will begin our sketch of Commencement with Sunday, May 22. 

COMMENCEMENT SUNDAY. 

As we have already intimated everything conspired to make 
the occasion a memorable one ; the weather was fine, the guests 
numerous, the exercises without flaw. 

A platform had been erected in the Home Moravian church, 
and on this was placed the graduating class, in front of the ministers 
who took part in the exercises of the hour. A beautiful pyramid of 
white water lilies graced the center of the platform, a generous gift 
from Dr. Bahnson. The music was fine ; in addition to the hearty 
congregational singing, and the beautiful solo by Miss Morrison, 
the choir of the Home church and the Salem Orchestra, under Prof. 
Peterson's direction, rendered a grand and inspiring selection. 

The speaker, Dr. H. F. Chreitzberg, of Winston Centenary 
Church, chose as his text the words found in II. Cor., 3:3 : " For- 
asmuch as ye are manifestly declared to be the epistle of Christ 
ministered by us, written not with ink, but with the spirit of the 
living God ; not in tables of stone, but in fleshly tables of the 
heart." An earnest listener declared that seldom has a more im- 
presive and powerful sermon been heard even in that church where 
so many impressive and powerful messages for Christ have been 
delivered. The same writer gives us the following able synopsis of 
the striking discourse : 

"The preacher's line of thought was striking. He said writ- 
ing stood for thought and thought represents character. We can 
judge what manner of men Tom Paine, John Human and Richard 



The Academy. 4035 

Baxter were by reading The Age of Reason, Pilgrim's Progress and 
Saint's Rest, and yet He whose thought has most shaped and 
moulded the world never wrote a line that is preserved to us. His 
life enforced his teachings, and so we, in our daily walk, are to ' be 
the epistles of Christ, written not with ink, but with the spirit of 
the living God ; not in tables of living stone, but in fleshly tables of 
the heart.' 

1 ' He said that there have been four revelations from God to 
the world. The first is Nature in all its beauty, harmony and sym- 
metry. The second, the Bible, in which He reveals Himself in ut- 
terances by His chosen prophets. The third is the incarnation. 
The fourth is the revelation of Himself to each human soul to make 
us living epistles. 

' ' The leading thought of this noble sermon was that each is to 
be a messenger for Christ by his life and conduct. It is by living 
epistles in the lives of true disciples that Christ's kingdom must 
come. He urged upon all, especially upon the young graduates, 
to live for Christ in very deed and truth ; that a thousand half 
Christians would not make a single whole one ; that a low standard 
of Christianity to-day is doing more harm than all the attacks of 
inffdelity. 

' ' Dr. Chreitzberg brought his discourse to a close by an apt 
and effective illustration. Still carrying out the thought that we 
are to be the epistles of Christ, he produced three sheets of paper. 
One, stained and blotted, would be unsuitable on which to write a 
letter of friendship and love. This stood for the unregenerate 
heart and evil life which could not in any sense be an epistle of 
Christ. The second was a sheet fair on the outside but all foul and 
blotted within. This typified the hypocrite who, with a fair exterior 
but corrupt and sinful within, could not be Christ's messenger to 
others. The third was a spotless sheet, pure and white, on which 
any letter might be written, and this is the heart purified by the 
atoning blood of Christ which cleanseth from all sin the heart which 
will make the life a living epistle, testifying for Christ and winning 
a wicked world to his kingdom." 

During the afternoon and evening of Commencement Sunday 
the regular Whitsuntide festival service and communion were held, 
and many of the visiting friends joined the congregation on these 
occasions. 



4006 The Academy. 

senior class day. 

Monday was given over to Class Day exercises. The plans 
had been carefully laid and the programmes were carried out in a 
very worthy and satisfactory manner, with credit to the Class and 
with pleasure to the gathered friends. Miss Lehman, their special 
teacher, had given much thought and care to these exercises, and 
still the free and rollicking spirit of the young people was in no 
way hampered. 

Monday morning was selected as the time for planting the 
Class Tree. Gathered as a class, with marshals selected from the 
lower classes, the class banner flying to the breeze, with white cap 
and gown appearing to advantage on that lovely spring morning, 
the seniors marched across the beautiful green campus, while the 
sound of stirring music inspired all with enthusiasm. The gentle- 
men who kindly contributed the splendid music were seated on the 
portico of Society Hall, and immediately in front were gathered the 
Seniors with their marshals. The members of the Salem Boys' 
School were present in a body, and many friends from Winston- 
Salem and from a distance Were on the campus, surrounding the 
excavation made for the tree. After a song by the Class Dr. Clewell 
was requested to make a few remarks, which he did, and was fol- 
lowed by Bishop Rondthaler, who spoke in his usual happy man- 
ner. More music followed, and then came the ceremony of the 
planting. The tree was a sugar maple, kindly presented by the 
Men's League of Salem, and when placed in position was soon 
made firm and fixed by the three shovels of earth which each pupil 
put about it. There was some amusement connected with the man- 
ner in which the shovel was handled by the fair young hands, but 
the place was at last filled, and the Class Tree stood erect and firm. 
There was more music, more remarks, and then the class quickly 
gathered in close, compact body around the tree, and each one 
stooping forward gave with right good will the Class Yell, which is 
as follows : 

Kritchem, kratchem, scritchem, scratchem, 

None are like 'em, none to match 'em, 

Crickety, rickety, roar, roar, roar, 

Noughty-four. 

When the girls moved gracefully away from the scene every 



The Academy. 4007 

one declared that the planting of the Class Tree for 1904 had been 
a great success. 

Mrs. Clewell had previously invited the Seniors to a private 
luncheon in her home, when once more as a class they could gather 
together, and with no one save the members of the class present to 
spend a social hour together. Mrs. Clewell was not present at 
Commencement, but Miss Wolle welcomed the girls to daintily 
arranged tables, and this hour proved to be one of the very enjoy- 
able parts of a delightful Commencement. 

In the afternoon of Monday the exercises of Senior Class Day 
were continued. The programme was the reading of Class Essays, 
musical selections largely by the members of the Class, and unveil- 
ing of the Class Banner. 

The chapel was well filled and handsomely decorated. The 
music was particularly bright and attractive. The programme was 
under the direction of Miss Lehman, Dr. Clewell presiding and in- 
troducing the essayists. The programme was as follows : 

Class Ivy, by Miss Corinne Baskin. 

Class History, by Miss Frances Powers. 

Class Prophecy, by Misses Ruth Matthews, Ruby McCork'le 
and Eva Harris. 

Class Will, by Miss Agnes Belle Goldsby. 

Class Banner, by Miss Mary B. Gudger. 

All of these essays were read with credit to the individuals and 
to the Class. The audience, made up of friends and relatives, were 
in sympathy with the efforts of the young ladies, and the hour may 
well be considered one of the successes of Commencement week. 

In the evening the first of the two grand concerts were given. 
Without venturing to comment on the excellence of the work done 
in the Piano and Vocal departments and in Elocution we will say 
that the efforts were received with great enthusiasm, and many 
good judges declared that the excellence of the work on both Mon- 
day and Tuesday evenings gave us the best programme ever ren- 
dered in the history of the School. The enjoyment was still further 
enhanced by the fact that a small fee was charged on each evening. 
This made the numbers smaller than would have otherwise been the 
case, and hence all were comfortable, not overcrowded, and better 
able to enjoy the exercises. The direction of these two splendid 



4008 The Academy. 

concerts was in the hands of Prof. Shirley, and pupils of Misses 
Morrison, Vest and Ackerman assisted. The following is the pro- 
program for Tuesday evening : 

Bridal Chorus from ' ' The Rose Maiden " Cowen 

Piano Duo. Ride of the Valkyrs Wagner 

Misses Lucile Robinson and Ruth Crist. 

Readings. — a. Mrs. Winkle's Grandson Dallas 

b. Nothin' 'at all Anon 

Miss Nell Rhea. 

Organ Solo. March in E flat Lefebure-Wely 

Miss Ivy Nicewonger. 

Song. Lovely Spring Coenen 

Miss Lucie Vance. 

Overture to Tannhauser Wagner 

Misses Speas, Lichenthaeler, Carter, Greider, Pianists. 
Mr. Shirley, Organ. 

Chorus of Revellers, from " Philemon et Baucis " Gounod 

Piano Duo. Scherzo from Concerto. Op. 32 Scharwenka 

Misses Evlyne Harris and Ruby McCorkle. 

Song. The Nymph of the Rhine Wekerlin 

Miss Corinne Easkin. 

Reading. Aux Italiens Meredith 

Miss Lita Young. 

Male Chorus. The Sword of Ferrara Bullard 

Piano Duo. Hungarian Fantasia Liszt 

Miss Jeter and Mr. Shirley. 

Waltz Song from ' ' Romeo and Juliet " Gounod 

Miss Maude Bulluck. 

Reading. The High Tide Ingelow 

Miss Ackerman. 

Chorus. Daughter of Error Bishop 

Miss Morrison. 

Chorus assisted by Mesdames H. E. Fries and B. Vogler, 
Misses Corbin, B. Leinbach, C. Leinbach, L. Leinbach, Lichten- 
thaeler, Vance, Sopranos. 

Mesdames Boozer, Sumner, Misses Hege, Woollen, Altos. 



The Ac v demy 4009 

Messrs. C. E. Crist, Deane, Huls, Lichtenthaeler, Vogler, 
Watson, Tenors. 

Messrs. Brickenstein, H. S. Crist, Ebert, Hege, F. Nissen, 
Thaeler, Basses. 

Miss Amy Van Vleck, Accompanist. 

Miss Lewis, Second Piano. 

Miss Rosa Deane, Organ. 

Orchestra — Messrs. S. E. Peterson, W. P. Ormsby, 1st Vio- 
lins ; James Kapp, Thomas Kapp, 2d Violins ; Bernard Wurreschke, 
Viola ; B. J. Pfohl, Double Bass ; Rev. J. K. Pfohl, Flute ; Walter 
Tise, 1st Clariuet ; W. J. Peterson, 2d Clarinet ; J. E. Peterson, 
Robt. Walker, Cornets ; Harry Mickey, Trombone ; Edw. Mickey, 
French Horn ; Glenn Woollen, Tympani ; Miss Myrtle Deane, 
Triangle. 

ALUMNAE DAY. 

Tuesday was given over to the former pupils. The Class Re- 
unions were held in the morning, and the public meeting in the 
School chapel in the afternoon. It is now more than fifteen years 
since the Alumnae Association was organized, and there have been 
many gatherings when, at banquet hall or in business meeting, 
there have been noteworthy hours. At the same time we believe 
that never in all these fifteen or more years have there been wit- 
nessed developments which will leave as deep an impression as the 
Alumnae Society meeting of 1904. The affectionate spirit which 
was abroad ; the kindly words spoken, both in regard to those still 
present as well as in regard to those who have ' ■ gone before ;•' ' the 
presence of so many friends from town who are not members but 
who are with the Association in spirit ; the unusual spirit of liber- 
ality ; altogether it was an impressive meeting, really overwhelming 
in its effects. We cannot approach an adequate description of the 
hour, it was necessary to have been present to appreciate the spirit 
of the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by Mrs. E. A. Ebert, First 
Vice President ; she read a paper from Mrs. Lindsay Patterson, 
who was absent from town, and in which she resigned her position 
as President. Miss Adelaide L. Fries read the minutes of the past 
year and Miss L. C. Shaffner communicated the Treasurer's report. 
Mrs. H. Montague read a paper on the new hall, after which Mr. J. 
W. Fries was called upon to address the meeting in regard to the 



4010 The Academy. 

new Alumnae Memorial building. This he did in his happiest vein, 
closing with the assurance that, under God's providence, the Hall 
would soon be an accomplished fact. 

Then followed a number of papers and addresses, all having as 
their object the presentation of gifts to the new building, but each 
one being in addition to a liberal gift a token of loving friendship to 
perpetuate the memory of some relative or friend. These gifts were 
so liberal, so numerous, so unexpected, so tender and loving, that 
the impression made was deep and lasting. The ladies and gath- 
ered friends were happy because the building of the Hall was now 
an accomplished fact ; they were touched because these gifts would 
perpetuate the memory of loved ones, and altogether it was a time 
which it is far sweeter to consider and dwell upon in secret hours of 
meditation than to attempt to portray with pen and paper. Hence, 
without further effort we will give the general list of the gifts of the 
afternoon, the detailed statement of the cash receipts being given 
elsewhere. 

The Mrs. L. M. Fries Memorial Scholarship was given by her 
children to perpetuate the memory of a now sainted mother, $4,000. 

$250 was given by the children of the late Bishop and Mrs. E. 
A. de Schweinitz to pay for one of the four large pillars in front of 
of the portico, the pillar to be a memorial pillar to the memory of 
Bishop and Mrs. de Schweinitz. 

In like manner the pupils of the Rev. Robert de Schweinitz 
pledged $250 to pay for another memorial pillar for Rev. and Mrs. 
Robert de Schweinitz. 

$250 were subscribed by pupils and friends of Bishop and Mrs. 
Rondthaler for a third pillar. 

Col. F. H. Fries donated $250 to pay for the fourth pillar, the 
same to be a memorial to Dr. J. H. Clewell and Mrs. Alice Wolle 
Clewell. 

A communication was read from the men of Salem in which 
they assumed the expenses connected with the great granite steps in 
front of the hall. These steps will approximate a cost of $2000, 
and on each of the steps is to be inscribed the name of one of the 
eleven Principals who have served the School during its century's 
history. 

An unkr,; \vn friend pledged a large marble tablet to be erected 



The Academy. 4011 

in memory of the large number of teachers and pupils who have 
taught and been taught within the School. 

Finally, Dr. Holland pledged $500 for a tablet in memory of 
his father, the late Rev. F. R. Holland, and one for Mrs. Denke, 
an esteemed teacher of earlier days. 

These gifts, with other income during the Commencement 
week, aggregated $8000 ; this amount added to the $10,000 already 
in hand gives the ladies $18,000, a sum sufficient to place the build- 
ing under roof. Thus was reached a "milestone" in the history 
of the Association, or shall we rather call it a memorial stone, for 
now the rapid prosecution of the work becomes an assured fact. 

The officers elected for the ensuing year are as follows : Presi- 
dent, Mrs. F. A. Ebert ; Vice Presidents, Mrs. H. Montagee, Mrs. 
W. N. Reynolds, Mrs. W. H. Barnard, Mrs. Thomas Kernan and 
Mrs. Mary L. Read ; Secretary, Miss Adelaide L. Fries ; Treas- 
urer, Miss L. C. Shaffner. 

The musical programme of the afternoon was in the care of 
Misses Amy Van Vleck, Barber and Miller. 

The social feature which followed was pleasing and enjoyable, 
Miss Wolle being the hostess. Refreshments were served while the 
friends renewed old acquaintances or made new ones. 

ART EXHIBIT. 

The Art Exhibit was in South Hall, and was open to the public 
a number of times during Commencement Week. The exhibit was 
under the personal direction of Miss Siedenberg, the head of the 
department, and consisted of beautiful work on glass and china ; 
also on canvass, oil and water colors ; and in addition some fine 
specimens of tapestry. The work was of a very higfi order, and it 
is possible to enjoy advantages in art in Salem seldom found outside 
of the great cities. 

COMMENCEMENT DAY. 

The closing day dawned bright and clear, with the ideal charms 
of May day weather. The invited guests from Winston-Salem and 
other sections who were to participate in the academic procession 
gathered at Bishop Rondthaler's residence, while the Faculty, the 
Seniors and the remainder of the School assembled in Main Hal!. 



4012 The Academy. 

At 10 o'clock, Dr. Clewell escorted Dr. Holland at the head 
of the procession from the large portico of Main Hall to the front 
entrance of the Home Church. The gentlemen visitors were fol- 
lowed by the Seniors bearing the beautiful daisy chain, Miss Leh- 
man and Miss Wolle leading, and Miss Marguerite Fries and Miss 
Kathleen Tay bearing the precious diplomas on silver salvers. The 
formal procession entered the church as Prof. Shirley played the 
March from Tannhauser. Rev. James E. Hall read the Scripture 
lessons when all were seated and Dr. p. Clay Lill^y, of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Winston-Salem, led in prayer. 

The literary address was delivered by the Rev. William J. 
Holland, D. D,, L. L. D., head of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg, 
Penna. , who was introduced to the audience by Mr. John W. Fries. 
Dr. Holland was welcomed into our midst for his eminence as a 
scientist, for, among the great names of the present day, he ranks 
easily as one of the first. For this reason he was welcomed. But 
there was another reason why Dr. Holland was a most welcome 
guest, — because in years gone by he was a resident of our section, 
and as such seemed to be very happy to renew his remembrance of 
early days. To both of these is to be added the fact that Dr. Hol- 
land is a fluent and eloquent speaker. Hence it will appear that 
our selection of speaker was this year unusually felicitous. 

Dr. Holland's address was a particularly happy one because 
in the three divisions he wisely planned to capture his audience ; 
this he did most effectually. 

The first portion of the address touched upon the reminiscences 
of his early days, and the feeling tribute paid to men and events 
showed the warm and friendly spirit. This, of course, met with a 
responsive feeling on the part of his audience. The second part 
was a philosophical treatise on man's relation to man, and while the 
subject was deep and profoundly treated, yet it was so presented as 
as claim the earnest and interested attention of his large company of 
hearers. The third part was filled with wise and kind remarks to 
the graduating class. * With this trio of themes it is not to be won- 
dered at that Dr. Holland captured his hearers, and that his address 
will go down in the history of Commencements as a remarkable 
effort. 

The address was printed in full in The Sentinel. It will be 



The Academy 4013 

impossible in our limited space to give even a synopsis of the effort, 
but in order that our readers may receive an idea of the treat en- 
joyed by the hearers we quote a few paragraphs from the opening, 
portion of the address. Dr. Holland said : 

' ' Nearly forty-one years ago, one bright November day, when 
the air was still and the sun was shining, and the' glory of the 
autumn still lingered upon the woodlands, I started upon the jour- 
ney which took me from my home among you. The conveyance 
in which we went from Salem to High Point, the nearest railway 
station, was driven by Robert de Schweinitz, at that time, as he had 
been for many years, the head of this famous institution of learning. 
I recall the pleasant converse of those hours, and the adventures of 
the perilous journey across a land which was scarred and blighted, 
by war, to the ancestral home of my mother in Pennsylvania. Many 
things have happened in the world, and many things have happened 
to me since I bade farewell to old Salem. But wherever I have been, 
in hut of a peasant or palace of a king, in crowded mart or in lonely 
wilderness, in the land of my birth or on distant continents, my 
mind has continually gone back, with an ever growing pleasure, to 
the days of my boyhood in this beautiful old town, every street of 
which, every hillside of which I knew as a boy with a knowledge 
most intimate. 

"I have had many teachers, and among them some of the 
most distinguised in America, but none to whom I personally accord 
a greater meed of gratitude than to that venerable man who, in the 
quiet of his study, taught us how to use books and how to drink 
deeply at the fountain of knowledge ; a man whose name is perhaps 
almost forgotten in this community, but who was, without excep- 
tion, one of the best teachers of youth I ever knew ; I refer to the 
late William Meinung. I wish in passing to pay a tribute of honor 
and gratitude to his memory. 

' ' And I cannot forget the debt that I owe to the memory of 
one of the good women of Salem, who, in my boyhood, was the 
librarian of this institution, Mrs. Mary Denke, the widow of the 
learned and distinguished missionary to the Delaware Indians, her- 
self a master of several languages. Of this splendid woman, and of 
her colleague, Miss Shober, both members of the faculty of this 
institution, Mrs. Jackson, the widow of Stonewall Jackson, one of 
the honored Alumnae of the Institution, said to me some years ago, 
' ' I am more indebted to them for valued and lasting intellectual, 
impressions than to any other of my teachers. ' ' 

After a solo "With Verdure Clad," Haydn, by Miss Maud 
Bulluck, the diplomas were presented to 49 graduates by Bishop-" 
Rondthaler, distributed as follows : 



4014 The Academy. 

Degree A. B. : Emma Laura Aird, Julia Withers Barnard, 
Corinne Price Baskin, Nellie Zevely Buford, Caroline Louise Crist, 
Ruth Estelle Crist, Mary Norman Culpepper, Lily Mary Parish, 
Ruby Estelle Follin, Emma Elizabeth Foust, Agnes Belle Goldsby, 
Emma Beatrice Greider, Frank Higgins Hanes, Eva Harris, Nata- 
: .line Haynes, Elizabeth Washington Knox, Elsie Viola Louhoff, 
Alice Glenn MacDonald, Ruby McCorkle, Ruth Ransom Matthews, 
"Margaret Mickle, Lula May Stipe, Frances Eugenia Stockton, 
Brietz Louise Thorn, Elizabeth Thomas Warren, Mary Jane Wat- 
lington, Julia Lindsay Wilson. 

Degree B. L. : Mary B. Gudger, Connie Lauretto Hege, Alma 
' Vida King. 

Degree B. S. : Grace Leslie, Frances Powers. 

Instrumental Music : Mary Adelaide Bailey, Mary Irene Hall, 
Eva Harris, Ruby McCorkle, Ivy Alberta Nicewonger. 

Vocal Music : Margaret Maud Bulluck. 

Elocution : Lita Kathleen Young. 

"Book-keeping : Sallie Belle Anderson, Loula Belle Glenn, 
Fannie Gibson Manning, Minnie Edwards Rauhut, Margaret May 
Tomlinson. 

Phonography : Floye May Clodfelter, Lula Belle Glenn, Mar- 
garet Gertrude Greenwood, Fannie Gibson Mangum, Margaret 
May Tomlinson. 

The closing feature of Commencement was the transfer of the 
'Cap and Gown to Miss Annie Sue Le Grande, President'Jof the 
Junior Class by Miss Mary Culpepper and Miss Nellie Buford, Pres- 
ident and Vice President of the Senior Class. This touching scene 
' tenderly closed the happy Commencement exercises and they)_in 
turn closed a happy and successful school-year. 



Gifts Received for the Alumnae Memorial Hall. 

Since we last published the donations for the Memorial Hall the 
-following cash amounts have been received. It is understood, of 
course, that a portion of these sums has already been expended on 
work thus far done upon the hall : 

Miss Annie McKinney, $2.00i Miss Mamie Bizzell, $1.00; 
~Mrs. Agnes Winston Goldsby, So. 00 ; Miss A. Steiner, $5.00 ; Miss 
i.'Mary Heberhard, $5.00 ; Interest Savings Fund, $1.56 ; Miss Pa- 
mela Bynum, $1.00; Mr. Eugene Vogler, 81.00; Mrs. A. F. 
"Moses, $1.00; Mrs. J. Crouse, $1.00; Cooking School (members 
-residing in Winston-Salem), $17.65; Mrs. j/H. Clewell, S5.00 : 
Lawn Party, given by Cooking School girls, 848.57 ; Proceeds of 



The Academy. 4015 

Dr. Wm. Hamilton's lecture, $20.75 ; Mrs. W. J. Peterson, $1.00; 
Mrs. Wm. Clinard, $10.00; Mrs. George Norfleet, $12.00; Mrs. 
Geo. Boozer, $1.00; Miss Elizabeth Heisler, $5.00; Mr. Herbert 
Vogler, $1.00; Mr. Clarence Lineback, $1.00; Bethania Branch, 
$32.60; Mr. Ralph Clinard, $1.00; Grand Concert, $125.50; 
Cash Alumnae Meeting, $30.90 ; Mrs. E. Rondthaler, $5.00 ; Mrs. 
T. H. Pegram, $1.00 ; Mrs. Aird, 50 ; Miss Katie Kilbuck, 50 ; 
Mrs. F. W. Foster, $3.00 ; Mrs. J. H. Clewell, $10.00. 

For the Rev. and Mrs Robt. de Schweinitz Memorial Column : 

Mrs. Maggie McDowell Watson, $1.00 ; Mrs. J. A. Caldwell, 
$5.00 ; Mrs. B. R. Barksdale, $1.00 ; Miss R. A. Yogler, $5.00 ; 
Miss Lucy Barlow, $2.00 ; Miss A. Van Vleck, $1.00 ; Cash, $2.75; 
Miss Maria Vogler, $10.00 ; Mrs. J. W. Fries. $10.00 ; Mrs. F. H. 
Fries, $10.00; Total, $47.75. 

For Rt. Rev. Edw. and Mrs. Rondthaler Me)7iorial Column : 

Miss Julia Barnard, $5.00 ; Morehead and Lucy Lathrop Pat- 
terson, $25.00 ; Asheville girls, $35.00 ; Miss Etta Shaffner, $5.00; 
Postal Card Company, $40.00. Total, $110.00. 

For the Organ Fund : 

By the Music Department Faculty, $57.02. 

The above amounts added to the gifts already acknowledged 
give us the sum of $10,244.70. To this should be added pledges 
to the amount of $8000.00 pledged for special purposes, making 
the grand total to date, $18,000. 

Miss L. C. Shaefner, Treas. 



Among the Faculty. 



We can only briefly note some of the changes of the year. 
The following will not be with us next year : Misses Bonney, Thomas, 
Wharton, Jeter, Speas and Ackerman. Some of these esteemed 
friends will study next year, some will teach, and some will, — well, 
we will not enter further into the subject, or we might reveal some 
secrets. But to one and all of these esteemed friends we extend 
our most hearty good wishes for a prosperous and happy year. 

We desire to introduce to our readers some of the new friends 
who have engaged themselves to join their efforts with our own to 
make the new year a memorable one. 

Miss Nannie Bessent will enter upon duties connected with the 
reguiar scholastic department. She has done very successful work 
for a number of years at Clemmons School, and is a pupil of our 
College. 



4016 The Academy 

Miss Laura Reid will be associated with the Music Department. 
Miss Reid is a pupil of Miss Vest, and has taught in Winston for 
some time, and has made her impress as a painstaking and thorough 
instructor. 

Miss Gertrude Brown will also enter the Music Department. 
She is a pupil of Prof. Shirley, and has spent two years in New 
York as a pupil of some of the most eminent artists of that city, 
bringing with her the very latest and best in methods to unite 
with her faithful and efficient work as a musician devoted to her art. 

These three new members of the Faculty for the next year 
are all pupils of Salem, devoted to the interests of both town and 
school, and as such we welcome them, They have gone out into 
the world to gain breadth of mind both in study and in teaching, 
and now they return to their Alma Mater and we welcome them. 

Miss Laura S. Clark (M. S. of Columbia University) will take 
charge of the Science Department. She is a specialist in Physics 
and Chemistry, and has taken her Master's. Degree both in Colum- 
bia University and in the Teachers' College, New York. Miss 
Clark has had eight years' experience in teaching in New England, 
and comes to us most highly recommended by Dean Russell, of 
Columbia, and by other members of the Faculty of this great uni- 
versity. In her personality Miss Clark is modest and unassuming 
and in disposition as well as in intellect has the unqualified endorse- 
ment of those who know 7 her best. Miss Clark's home is in New- 
England. 

Miss Rilla Garrison will take charge of the Department of Elo- 
cution and Physical Culture. She is a young lady of prepossessing 
appearance, an enthusiast in her chosen profession, and uniting the 
three desirable features of excellence in stage readings, teaching 
elocution and in gymnasium work. Miss Garrison is a full graduate 
of the famous Curry School of Expression, of Boston, and was 
selected by Mrs. Curry as the very best candidate for this depart- 
ment. She will bring with her the approved methods of the Curry 
School, which is now one of the very hest schools of Elocution in 
the United States. Her pleasing personality on the platform will 
win for her the favor of the public, and the ability to give profes- 
sional gymnasium work will enable us to supply this important 
branch of physical culture in a better form than ever in the past. 
Miss Garrison's home is in New England. 

The above gives a brief introduction to the new friends ; we 
will add in concluding this sketch that th° other faithful and efficient 
workers will be with us to make next year a still more successful 
and glorious one than the past session. 



THE EUTERPEAN 



AND 



THE HESPERIAN 



This department is devoted to the combined interests of the 
Euterpean and Hesperian Literary Societies. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Agnes Belle Goldsby, E. L. S. \ c.,i; f _„ ;„ ru;^c 

Florence Moorman, H. L. S. } Editors-in-Ch.ef. 

Mary B. Gudger, E. L. S. ] 

Frances Powers, E. L. S. [■ Assistant Editors. 

Cammje Lindley, H. L. S. J 

Helen M. Blandford, E. L. S. ) t •*„„. t-j„ , 

Ora Hunter, H L. S. } Llterar y EdltorS 

Carrie Levy, E. L. S. I t? u c i , 

Brietz Thom, H. L. S. f Exch a"ge Editors. 

Corinne Baskin, E. L. S. 1 d ■ ., 

Rusha Sherrod, H. L S. } Bu s'ness Managers. 



Emma B Greider, E. L S. 
Oka Hunter, H. L. S. 



V Artists. 



IStittortal. 



— Every traveller has a home of his own, and he learns to 
appreciate it the more from his wanderings. 

— Dickens. 



4018 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

— " All the world's a stage and the men and women merely 
players." We, the editorial staff of The Euterpean and The 
Hesperian, trust that we have played our part well during the 
past season, and before the curtain falls we wish to thank you, our 
patrons, for helping us in our work. We feel confident that you 
have become so interested in our little paper that you will do all in 
your power to further its success and heartily echo the sentiment of 
the Latin poet who says : Vivat Accidentia ! 



— Miss Corinne Baskin has been appointed Editor-in-chief of 
The Euterpean and Miss Florence Moorman will again be 
" head-man " for The Hesperian. 



A Matchmaker in Disguise. 

Contimied from April issue. 

F. M , H L S. 



Swiftly, so swiftly as to seem to be on wings, the early part of 
the wonderful Reception Day had passed for all of the assembled 
company except our unfortunate hero. Every minute had seemed 
an hour to him caged in the study as he was. He had found plenty 
of time for repentance, too, so for two mortal hours he had suffered 
from ' ' pangs of remorse. ' ' 

Now, the long-looked for, much thought of, and extremely 
welcome reception lunch was ready. But the lunch was no more 
ready than the guests. Hungry almost to starvation, as the chil- 
dren extravagantly said, the guests were seated at three long tables 
in the spacious dining room. 

There was Laurie, no worse apparently for his sojourn in the 
study, and there was his sister, too. In spite of Laurie's desperate 
efforts to keep her at home — curiosity, woman's great failing, had 
triumphed over all else, and Mary Wynne was present to see and 
be seen, hear and be heard as the case might be, much to her young 
brother's discomfort, however. 

Ever since Laurie's freedom from his confinement he had en- 



The Euterpean and The Hesperian 4019* 1 

deavored to avoid his sister and her devoted admirer, Laurie's per- 
secutor. But there seemed no doing it; Those two ' ' stuck closer 
than a brother, ' ' and no matter where the youth turned they were 
sure to be at his heels. There seemed at least two dozen of each i 
of them for they were everywhere. On the campus they had 
insisted upon strolling around with him; when he had suddenly de- 
cided to go into the house,, they had decided likewise, and now, to • 
cap the climax, they had managed to drift to him at the table. 
Mary, the centre of attraction, with, on the one hand, the attentive 
schoolmaster and on the other the anything but attentive brother, 
longing for escape. 

Laurie had thought himself hungry but the company seemed 
to prevent his eating. Every mouthful seemed to choke him, and 
he made one effort after another to appear at ease and eat a hearty 
meal, only to be met with failure each time, until his sister observ- 
ing his lack of appetite asked : " Why aren't you eating something, 
Laurie? Any one to see you would think that you were in love !" 
but the boy threw up his hands in holy terror, upsetting his glass 
of water, and announced tragically, ' ' If any one ever finds me 
mixed up in love affairs he has my permission to shoot me," and 
that subject was dropped, while the unfortunate Laurie endeavored 
to wipe up the spilled water. 

But, later, the provoking conversation drifted back to a dan- 
gerous topic. This time it was ' ' acting. ' ' During the day the 
company had discussed having an ' ' amateur ' ' play during Com- 
mencement, and it was about this that Mary and Mr. Moore were 
now so extremely interested. 

" I think that there are few here," observed the girl, glancing 
around the large room, •' who would really care to take any active 
part in a play. It's all very well to be audience, but when it comes 
to taking a working part it's quite another thing." 

Then her glance around the room met Laurie's, and there 
stopped. In his confusion the lad's face flashed guiltily for it came 
back to him with double force that he himself was not a very poor 
actor, " Laurie might act very well," continued the girl, "though, 
he has never tried any, I believe.- Do you think you could, 
Laurie?" 

But the youth shook his head decidedly, and answered, ' ' No,, 
thanks. A Utile acting goes a long' way with me. I attempted 



4020 The Euterpean and The Hesperian 

.acting once and it was so successful that I decided to live on my 
laurels and not attempt it again. ' ' 

His sister looked surprised, and asked : " Why, when did you 
act ? I never heard anything about it ?' ' 

Whereupon the disturbed Laurie answered as calmly as he 
could: "Oh, very likely not. It was not much advertised, and 
the audience was limited, but I assure you the tableau was appre- 
ciated to the fullest extent by all who took part, ' ' and the wonder- 
ing girl, more mystified than ever, asked her non-committal brother 
no more questions about his acting. 

The lunch over, Mr. Moore, who, whenever politeness would 
allow absence from his other guests, had remained by Mary- 
Wynne's side all day, could wait no longer for the answer which 
was to make him the happiest or the most miserable of men. ' ' He 
seized this opportunity, and asked : 

" Miss Wynne, have you seen my library since it was refur- 
nished?" and the girl innocently answered, "No, indeed, Mr. 
Moore, I have never been in any of the rooms except the parlor 
and the dining-room. ' ' 

At this statement Mr. Moore looked somewhat surprised, and 
muttered something about " unseeing eyes," for he remembered a 
certain scene which took place in his study, and this certain young 
lady was there, too, and yet she'd never seen the room ! Funny, 
wasn't it? 

"Come this way, then," said the schoolmaster, and the girl 
"followed. 

When they had reached the room the unsuspecting girl gazed 
admiringly around, but the schoolmaster had not came to gaze. 
Changed from the grave schoolmaster into the passionate lover, he 
took the girl's two hands in his strong grasp and said, eagerly, 

' ' Your presence, to-day, my darling, can have but one happy 
meaning for me. But let me have it from your own lips. Is it 
yes ?' ' 

The startled girl sprang from him, and, retreating a few steps, 
stood looking wonderingly at him, and finally managed to stammer : 

"My presence? What question? I do not know of |any 
question which I could answer either by my presence or by my 
absence. ' ' 



The Eute.vPean and The Hesperian. 4021 

It was Mr. Moore's turn to look astonished, and he did the 
subject justice, too. 

'.' Did you not come to me on your brother's behalf yesterday 
evening," he asked. 

The girl looked at him, ha!f pityingly, as though she thought 
him demented, and answered in the negative. Then the mystified 
schoolteacher stepped up to the girl and, taking both of her hands 
into his own, burst out : 

' ' Mary, give me my answer now, in spite of my mistake of 
yesterday. What is it, sweetheart?" 

The answer must have been all he wished, for stooping over 
her he kissed her tenderly on the lips. 

"Golly, what a tableau!" said a voice close beside them, 
though inaudible to the happy lovers. ' ' Old Moore seems to have 
made things all right, so what's the use of a fellow's confessing?" 

Laurie was eavesdropping. There is no use denying it, for his 
eye was certainly uncomfortably close to the keyhole, so he had 
witnessed the whole scene. But he should be excused, should he 
not ? For the day, at least, Laurie had been ' ' more sinned against 
than sinning. ' ' 

'"And now," said Mr. Moore, looking into the girl's face, 
' ' you will help me to clear the mystery. Propose to some one in 
my study yesterday evening I certainly did. But who could it 
have been ?' ' 

"Please, sir, it was I," said a meek voice at his side, and 
Laurie, the humble confessor, stood there. 

"It was you, was it?" asked Mr. Moore, looking with an 
amused light in his eyes at the youth, then, turning to the boy's 
sister, said, "he is your only rival, my sweetheart, and you shall 
decide what we must do with him. What shall the penalty be?" 

The girl met her brother's imploring eyes. 

"Forgive him," she softly said, and with these two words a 
burden rolled from the soul of Master Lawrence Wynne. 

THE END. 



4022 The Euterpean and The Hesperian. 

jr>octet?) jBlotes anti Uorals. 



M B G AND F P 



— The last meeting of the Euterpean Society this term was 
held on May thirteenth. The following officers were chosen and 
will begin their various duties next session : 

President — Jennie F. Cardwell. 

Vice President — Lila Little. 
' Secretary — Esther Hampton. 

Critic — Carrie Levy. 

Chaplain — Corinne Baskin. 

Treasurer — Margery Wilson. 

Librarian — Emma B. Greider. 

— Every year the girls leave something to beautify their Hall, 
and we are glad to say that the handsome mahogany tables, of 
which the Euterpeans are justly proud, arrived before Commence- 
ment. They correspond beautifully with the heavy officers' chairs 
given last year. Then this self-same Scciety has recently received 
an exquisite picture, "The Child, St. John," presented by Miss 
Hannah Dewey, a former member. 

— April, and May as we 11, brought showers of good times to 
the girls, especially the Seniors. The ' ' naughty fours ' ' are grate- 
ful to Dr. and Mrs. Clewell for the delightful hay ride to and the 
moonlight trip back from Old Town ; to the Juniors for the enjoy- 
able day spent with them at Nissen Park ; to Mr. and Mrs. Henrv 
Fries for the charming trolley party, and last, but by no means 
least to Dr. and Mrs. Clewell and Miss Wolle for the Class 
Banquet on May the twenty-third when each ' ' sweet girl graduate ' ' 
openly declared that she was just having the time of her life. 



— The Seniors and Juniors, under the escort of Bishop Rond- 
thaler, made a number of delightful excursions into the neighbor- 
hood of the school grounds, just before the close of school. A favor- 
ite spot was Violet Hill, where not only did they find the beautiful 
woods violets, but happy were those who were successfuLenough^to 
secure specimens of the rare velvet leaf violets. 



The Academy. 4023 

10 2d YEA.Il 



§ALGm ACADG01Y 

ADD (JOLLGGG 

WINSTON-8ALEM, IV, C 



Salum Academy and College has, during the one hundred years of its history, con- 
tinually hdded to the comfort of its buildings, and the beauty of its grounds. Experience 
has enabled the School to carelully test its methods, and in this respect it offers special ad- 
vantages. The devotion to the cause of education which the Church has always shown 
from the times of its great educator, Bishop John Amos Comenius, and, through the four 
centnries of the Church's history, is found to exist in the Salem Academy and College at 
the present day, and parents \\ ho commit their children to the care of the Schocl are alwaj s 
well pleased with the resulis. 

The peculiar home-life of the School, the personal interest in each individual pupil, the 
fine moral and religious spirit which surrounds the pupils, the splendid climate — these are 
some ot the influences which bring pupils from far and near, and which have gained for the 
School the confidence and trust of every section and creed 

In addition to the general advantages enumerated above, there are certain special feat- 
ures seldom found in schools. The domestic arrangements are so nearly akin to those of a 
well-regulated home, that pupils who are deprived of parental care may find the great bless- 
ng of a true home within Salem Academy and College, even very young girls. 

The particularly fine climate is drawing many pupils from Northern States, and as the 
household arrangements have been improved and modernized, the table fare given special 
attention, and the curriculum strengthened, the School lias been drawing from a widening 
field of patronage. 

As the School is now arranged it is possible for a pupil not only to secure a good colle- 
giate education, but in addition to this the advantages in Music are unusually fine, including 
vocal as well as piano, organ and other instruments. It is impossible in a brief sketch to 
describe all the various special schools which have grown and developed around the main 
Collegiate Department. There is the Art Department, with its work in oil and water colors 
its China Painting' its Drawing, and the various lines of Fancy Work. There is the Domes- 
tic Science Department, where Cooking is taught in the most approved methods. We note 
also the Commercial Department, where buok-keepers and shorthand writers are prepared 
Nor should we oveilook the Elocution Department, and the Linguistic Department, each of 
which are separate Schools, with strongly developed lines, and the Lessons in the care of 
the Sick. 

Those who are interested in examining into the work of the School at the present time 
should send to the School-office for the official Catalogue, of last year "a copy of which wil 
be sent on application. In this Catalogue the woik of the School is desciibed in detail. 
Address 

Rev. J. H. CLEWELL, Ph. D., Principal. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



4024 The Academy. 

POSITIVE 

GOOD PHOTOGRAPHS 

COMPARATIVE 

BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS 

SUPERLATIVE 

LEARYS PHOTOGRAPHS 

NAZARETH HALL, 

NAZARETH, PA. 

Moravian Boarding School for Boys. 

FOUNDED 1785. 

Beautiful location and exceptionally healthful climate. Military organization combined 
with home-care for the individual scholar. Besides the regular Academic Course of Study 
and music, the preparation for College or for the technical Schools may be undertaken. 

Terms $330 per annum. The Easter Session begins January 10th, i8gj. 

Rev. S.J. BLUM, Principal. 



ANGEL, SPONGE and POUND CAKES. 



Cream PufLs, ~) 20 cts. Vanilla Wafers,") 10 cts. 

Crescents, <- per Kisses, ^ per 

Cup Cakes, J dozen. Macaroons, ) dozen. 



Chocolate, Caramels, and Cocoanut Layers. 

Wweww Crake W#n lile» ■ 



The Academy. 



4025 



ROSENBACHER & BRO.'S 
DEPARTMENT STOEE. 

has just received a handsome line of 



1TOVELTIES 

in Spring materials for 

COAT SUITS, 

SHIRT WAIST SUITS, 
EVENING COSTUMES. 

Fine Patterns for Coat Suits and Dresses only one of a kind 



Pretty Shoes 



of all kinds consisting of SHOP 
SANDAL-, NEWPORT 



TIES and OXFORDS, in both 

-J 

BLACK and TAN now in. 



Ask to see the " St. Cecilia " Shoes 
ROSENBACHER & BRO. 




4026 



The Academy. 



Schouler's Department Store 

Our Dress Goods Department 

Invites your inspection with a magnificent assortment of rich radiance. 
France, England, Germany and last but not least America. All contribute 
their quoto toward the make up of this rare aggregation of Dress Goods 
elegance comprising the swellest productions obtainab e in Dress Fabrics. 
Plain Weaves are prominent in this display of onrs Zebelines, Camel's 
Hair, Venetians, Melton's, Searges, Worsteds, Doskins, Broadcloths, and 
many otht-rs t at h^ve a great unobtrusive elegance hard to resist. While 
on the otl rr hand we havt- a stock that includes a full line of high class 
Novelties— Fabiio- thai hold the interest of all who appreciates exquisite 
textiles. Among them are Homespuns, Pincheck, Amures, Boncle, Pana- 
mas, Sharkskin, Noil Suiting, Fancy Vaile and scores of others that will 
please the most exclusive and exacting taste. Each of our other depart- 
ments have been equally as well cared for and invite inspection. 

SOROSIS SHOES. 

We are sole agents in North Carolina except Asheville for the 
sale of this celebrated Shoe: 




Schouler's Department Store 



The Academy. 



4027 



SALEM BOYS' SCHOOL, 

FOUNDED 17JM. 

SALEM N. C. 

FALL TERM will open in its commodious and splendid new school building 
constructed according to best ideas of lighting, heating and ventilation ; 
thoroughly equipped in all its departments; regular gymnasium practice. 
Graduates from Classical Course enter Siate University without examination, 
Situations easily se^uied by those completing course in Commercial Arithmetic. 
Book-keeping, Phonography, and T\ pe- Writing. Special courses in Music and 
Elocution. Home accommodations for boarders. Send for catalogu.3. 

J AS. F. BllOWBR, A. M., Head Master. 



YOU 

WANT 
THE 



THAT'S 
ALL 



SO 

us 



GO? 



V/INSTON, 
N. C. 



HOTEL CT03STES. 

J. L. JONES, late of Jones House, Proprietor 
WINSTON N. C. 

All modern conveniences provided. Electric lights andbells. Table abundantly supplied 
with the very best that the market affords. We are anxious to please. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 

At Depot ask for Hotel Jones 'Bus. 

Reference : Salem Female Academy. 



4028 The Academy. 



OUR SPECIALTIES : 

STERLING SILVERWARE 

FINE WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

We have everything- else kept in a first-class 
Jewelry Store. 

Special attention paid to mail orders. 
Fine Repairing and Engraving. 

Very Respectfully, 

W. T. VOGLEE & SON, 

WINSION-SAI.EM, X. ft 



I. JUU' 



a 

ILJ jm. -v \ x 



WINSTON-SALFM. N, C. 

PLUMBER, 

TINNER, 
CORNICE WORKER. 



THE ACADEMY. 

Vol.27. Winston-Salem, N. C, September, 1904. No. 239. 



Entered as second-class matter in the POsloffiou al Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Published each month of school-year, at 50 cents pep year. Devoted 
:to the interests of Salem Academy and College and Alumn te Society 
of Salem Academy and College. All subscriptions and communica- 
tions should be addressed to Phi Academy, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

iStiitortal. 

— The Academy this month again assumes its original form, 
the members of the Euterpean and Hesperian Societies having de- 
cided to begin the publication of a periodical under the joint man- 
agement of the two Societies. We were glad to have had them 
united with us during the two past years, and we wish them abund- 
ant success in their new venture. 



— The article which appears elsewhere entitled ' ' North Caro- 
lina Fungi," by Miss Lehman, will be found to be of great interest 
and value to all nature lovers. In years gone by we have had men 
and women of eminence who have sought out and classified the 
treasures in the plant life of this portion of our State, and it seems 
that the subject has not been exhausted. The rambles of Professor 
Shirley and John H. Clewell, Jr., during the Summer were 
often into fields seldom traversed by any one from our towns, and 
the interest displayed by Miss Lehman and Miss Elizabeth 
Chitty was equal to that of the gentlemen named above, the ladies 
having themselves made a number of excursions into the surround- 
ing woods, as well as having studied all the specimens with faithful 



4030 The Academy. 

and painstaking- care. A number of eminent specialists in the north 
have been interested in the work, and the results of the summer's 
work is a real contribution to the nature study of our section, from 
a scientific view, as will be seen by a study of Miss Lehman's arti- 
cle supplemented by the list which follows. The number of speci- 
mens which have been found and classified is, to say the least, 
remarkable, and will no doubt be a surprise to many who will for 
the first time become aware of the large variety of mushrooms in 
our vicinity. 



— It has become customary for some years past to print the 
first two numbers of The Academy very near to each other, since 
the accumulated news of the vacation is more than enough to fill 
one issue. The length of Miss Lehman's article needs no apology. 
It is a real contribution to science, and as such is of great value. 

Hence the October number of our paper which will appear in 
about two weeks after this one, will be considered as a part of the 
first number. In that we will give the news of the vacation and of 
the opening, the list of pupils and the acknowledgement of gifts 
received, an account of the progress made in the erection of- the 
Alumnae Hall, and the description of the improvements of the 
Summer. 



— Regarding the opening of School we will briefly note in this 
number that it was just as bright and happy as could be desired. 
The number of boarding pupils is now between 160 and 170, all 
available space in the main buildings as well as Vogler Hall having" 
been filled during the first days. A very comfortable suit of rooms 
is being prepared in the second story of South Hall, with all mod- 
ern conveniences, and very desirable in every way, and the late 
arrivals will be cared for with every possible comfort, as fully as if 
they had been with us from the beginning. 

— Mr. Pfohl has been very busy during the Summer visiting 
among the patrons and pupils, and calling upon prospective patrons. 
He speaks verv highly of the uniform courtesy and kindness shown 
him, and we find that a personal visit to intending patrons is often a 
matter of special satisfaction to them, as it enables them to secure 
the desired information with greater facility than is possible by letter. 



The Academy. 4031 

North Carolina Fungi. 



BY E. A. LEHMAN. 



Among the rieh?noral and vegetable treasures of the Old North 
State, none open up a more beautiful and interesting field, apart 
from their economic value, than the mushrooms or toadstools, as 
some people term them. They are popularly, but very incorrectly, 
adjudged to be divided ;into two classes: mushrooms — edible fungi 
— and toadstools — poisonous or hurtful. This is all wrong ; some 
■so-called toadstools are edible, and some are not ; the same being 
conversely true of mushrooms. This simple form of classification 
is somewhat like that of Miss Asphyxia Smith, a hard-headed, hard- 
handed, hard-hearted New England spinster of Mrs. Stowe's por- 
trayal, who placed all "blows" (as she termed flowers), into two 
•classes — those that were good for tea, and consequently desirable 
— and those that were not, decidedly undesirable, utterly to be con- 
temned and despised. Now, why mushrooms should be called 
toadstools is one of the mysteries of modern usage. They cer- 
tainly offer a surface on which a luxurious toad might sit, sleepily 
meditative about the mysterious jewel in his head that Shakespeare 
kindly gave him, but 1 never yet have seen a toad so inclined, even 
with his reflective habits :; the only creature I have ever seen on one 
was a snail, and as he carried his house with him there was no need 
■of an extra stool for his 'comfort. 

The display of mushrooms in our Salem woods during the past 
moist summer with which we were favored was very fine. Professor 
Shirley and J. H. Clewell, Jr., both nature lovers and botanists, 
first aroused interest in these unique formations by bringing in these 
woodland treasures from early spring days, beginning with the deli- 
cious Morel or Morchella, justly prized even in the country round 
about us for its edible value. Its conical top or Pileus, mottled with 
dark cavities, cause it to be readily recognized beyond possibility of 
mistake. Mary Rogers Miller, in her exquisite "Brook Book," 
pays a glowing tribute to this mushroom and its qualities, which 
appeal to head, heart and stomach. 

As we glanced through the woods beyond Nissen Park we 



4032 The Academy. 

noted the Amanita' s pure, fleecy,, snow-white cap or pfleus, gills, as 
the transverse, fluted folds underneath are termed,, the ring or an- 
nulus just below this cap encircling the stem ; the fleecy veil which 
at first covered the gills, breaking away into flocculent pieces; the 
swollen, bulbous base, growing out ©fi a white volva or enveloping- 
cup — the whole so pure-looking, so attractive, that almost any one 
would exclaim : " Why, it looks as if it would almost melt in one's 
mouth." Yet this beautiful, innocent-looking mushroom is the 
deadly Amanita phalloides, of which a piece as large as a nickel 
would cause death, and that without hope of antidote unless it could 
be given very soon after eating. It is the same poison that is found 
in the rattlesnake's fangs, and just as dangerous. Even handling it 
gave me very unpleasant sensations, constriction of throat and in- 
tense burning of mouth and chest. 

In close proximity we see the imperial mushroom, the Ama- 
nita C&sarea, and well does it sustain its regal name. Before fully 
opening it looks like a bright red thimble or cap on the finger. As 
it opens it becomes a deep orange disk, blood red in the center, 
while the striated edges give it the fringed appearance of a fine sun- 
flower ; the yellow stem, fleecy with fragmentary veil and annulus, 
altogether form a magnificent specimen of its kind, easily ranking 
first in royal beauty. As to its qualities ? well, even Caesar Augus- 
tus was slightly mixed. There is a sort of difference of opinion 
about its edible qualities, and whenever there is such a difference it 
is best to leave it alone — at least not to eat it. Amanita muscari, 
or Fly Amanita, is also very handsome, deep orange, covered with 
white floccose warts. The Russians eat it, but the Czar Alexis of 
Russia, and Count Vecchi, at Washington, were killed by eating it. 
Besides these two magnificent members of a royal family, there are 
others, the Amanita aspera, with red-brown centre ; the Amanita 
alba, pure white, but covered with warty scales on top. It is a 
large family, and while some few members are said to be edible; 
" Beware !" is written all over their baleful beauty. The Amani- 
topsis and the Lepiota are closely /related and are said to be edible. 

The Boleli form a great and stately group ; they are found in 
our woods in abundance, in every variety of color and size, but only a 
few species in over 500 are at all edible. Their deep red caps, with 
lemon-colored tubes, making a soft, velvety under-surface instead of 



The Academy 4033 

fluted gills — their distinguishing feature — are seen all about us; then 
we find the chestnut-colored, tawny, pale-pinkish, white, and even 
black, scurfy caps, every variety of color, the top feeling like soft- 
dressed buckskin. One, the Boletus satauus, is said to be very 
poisonous, — at least, the name condemns it. We found thirty-five 
species in our immediate vicinity, all of striking appearance. 

The Russulas are also very handsome, bright red or greenish 
caps, with white or red stems, but more or less dangerous. The 
Cortinari, with bright purple, or, rather, violet-colored members, are 
very beautiful. 

From these dangerous specimens we turn to the beautiful 
Clavarias, club-shaped or coral mushrooms, some shaped like elk 
horns, or clubs, or sea-weed, with great variety of coloring. We 
find large masses of pure white, or of tan color, pink-tinted, purple, 
salmon, pale yellow ; indeed, these Clavaria in themselves deserve a 
chapter for their beauty and edible qualities. They are certainly 
not toadstools, for the tiniest red toad that ever crept out of the 
ground after a rain could neither find a seat on them or under them. 
Taking a mass of Clavarias up carefully, we find the decaying leaves 
and mold completely permeated, bound together by numberless 
white threads, the Mycelium, or the source from which all mush- 
rooms grow. The spores or dust-like seeds of these plants, like 
those of ferns, are tiny specks, but when they fall into favorable 
places — damp mold — they germinate, send out these white mycelial 
threads, and gradually the baby mushroom bud springs up, devel- 
oping rapidly, but " not in a night," as some will say. There is a 
long process back of its appearance on the surface. The mushroom 
that we see is what the apple is to the tree — the fruit — but its 
beautiful, intricate belongings are hidden in the soil, where few 
ever see them. 

Then the giant Hydnum imbricatum appears, each species 
knowing its own time, like the spring^flowers, that pass away to 
give place to summer colors, and they, in turn, make way for 
the golden glow of the autumnal flowers. These hydnums, lying 
•almost prone on the dead leaves, look like great brown pansies, 
.from eight to ten inches across, depressed below the centre, and 
marked with black, imbricated scales. Instead of the fluted gills of 
•other mushrooms, they have pale lilac-colored, hairy teeth, about 



4034 The Academy,. 

half an inch Icng, forming a smooth, velvety under-surLce. The 
stem is shcrt and lateral or one-sided. There are many varieties of 
these hvd:ums, with shorter teeth. Sometimes you find a large 
patch el (mall, brownish, zonale cups, from one to two inches 
across— pretty Hydnum zonatum — while others grow against trees, 
like a bracket, resembling the Polyporus. This, also, is a large 
f